Lady Nicholas Windsor

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Lady Nicholas Windsor
Born Paola Louise Marica Doimi de Lupis[1][2]
(1969-08-07) 7 August 1969 (age 49)
London, England
Alma mater
Spouse(s)
Children 3
Parent(s)
Relatives Peter Frankopan (brother)

Lady Nicholas Windsor previously Princess Paola Doimi de Lupis de Frankopan Šubić Zrinski (born Paola Louise Marica Doimi de Lupis; 7 August 1969)[3] is the wife of Lord Nicholas Windsor, son of the Duke and Duchess of Kent.

Early life[edit]

Lady Nicholas Windsor was born as Paola Louise Marica Doimi de Lupis (she used this name until her time as an undergraduate at Cambridge).[1][2] By the time of her marriage she was known as Princess Paola Doimi de Lupis de Frankopan Šubic Zrinski[3] in London in 1969. Her father is Louis, Prince Frankopan, Count Doimi de Lupis, born in Split, Croatia, then in the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, in 1939.[4]

Lady Nicholas's father is a member of the old Croatian and Italian nobility, and came to England after the Second World War to attend a boarding school and then go to Oxford University. He is a barrister (a member of Middle Temple) and a businessman; her mother, Ingrid Detter, is a distinguished Professor Emeritus at Stockholm University.

Her father was born Louis Doimi de Lupis and later controversially added the names of Šubić, Zrinski and Frankopan under British civil law[5] and the title of Prince, having previously adopted the title of Count.[6] While the Doimi de Lupis family were granted a knighthood by Emperor Franz Joseph I in 1855 and 1865, their right to use the names of several Croatian medieval noble families and the title of prince (never held by any of the mentioned families, who were in Latin[7][8][9], Croatian[10][11][12], Hungarian[13][14][15] and Italian[16][17][18] historical documents styled as Counts of Bribir (Šubić), Counts of Zrin (Zrinski) and Counts of Krk (Frankopan)) has been highly disputed. The Croatian Nobility Association expelled the Doimi de Lupis family from their membership and called the name changes a falsification,[19] while John Kennedy, editor of Almanach de Gotha, the directory of Europe's royalty and nobility, stated that the use of the name Frankopan by the Doimi de Lupis family was "more aspirational than inherited".[20]

In the late 1990s, trying to save the reputation of his family name, Louis's cousin Mirko Jamnicki-Dojmi di Delupis wrote an open letter in which he denounced claims to Frankopan, Šubić and Zrinski names by his family and presented the family tree of Dojmi di Delupis containing 129 names from the year 1200 onwards. Miroslav Granic from the Zadar Faculty of Philosophy, considered to be Croatia's pre-eminent genealogy expert, similarly disparaged the Doimi de Lupis family's claims, considering them to be in line with past attempts at falsification to claim the Frankopan name.[21] Ivan Mirnik, of the Archaeological Museum of Zagreb, notes that this family has usurped the surnames with no genealogical justification. He also compares the act with other historical frauds.[22] The Croatian media and newspapers have also stated that there is no connection between the historical Frankopans and the modern family, calling them "False Frankopans".[23]

Lady Nicholas herself attended Cambridge under her birth name of 'Paola Louise Marica Doimi de Lupis' (in 1989)[1]; by 1993 her entry includes the added 'Frankopan Šubic', whilst parenthetically including her original name for clarification.[2] The announcement of Lady Nicholas's marriage refers to her parents as 'Don' and 'Donna'.[24]

She has one sister, Christina, and three brothers, Peter, Nicholas, and Lawrence.

Education and career[edit]

Paola Windsor speaks seven languages, and was educated at St Paul's Girls' School and at Wycombe Abbey, where she was a William Johnston Yapp Scholar. She read Classics at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge where she was a Choral Scholar and took a Diplôme d'Etudes Approfondies (M.Phil. equivalent) at Paris IV, La Sorbonne in Philosophy, submitting a thesis on L'autorité de l'État (English: "The authority of the state") in French.[25]

She has, as Paola Frankopan, written for The Tatler, where she is a contributing editor, and for Vogue USA.[26] She has published an introduction to the history of the Sanctuary of Trsat (Trsatska Sveta Kuća in Croatian).

Marriage and family[edit]

She met her future husband, Lord Nicholas Windsor, at a millennium party in New York in 1999,[26] and their engagement was announced on 26 September 2006.[27] They married on 4 November 2006 in the Church of Santo Stefano degli Abissini in the Vatican City, following a civil ceremony on 19 October 2006 in a London register office[28] and she became Lady Nicholas Windsor. The bride wore a Valentino wedding gown.[29] This was the first time a member of the British Royal Family married at the Vatican.[30]

Lord and Lady Nicholas Windsor's first child, a son, Albert Louis Philip Edward, was born on 22 September 2007, at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London.[31][32] At birth Albert was 26th in the line of succession. Albert was baptised in the Queen's Chapel at St James's Palace in London.

Lady Nicholas gave birth to their second child, Leopold Ernest Augustus Guelph,[33] on 8 September 2009 at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital. He was baptised by Cardinal Comastri in St Peter's Basilica in the Vatican.

A third son, Louis Arthur Nicholas Felix Windsor, was born 27 May 2014 and later baptised in the Queen's Chapel at St James's Palace in London.

Ancestry[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Cambridge University List of Members Up to 31 December 1988, Cambridge University Press, 1989, pg 345
  2. ^ a b c Cambridge University List of Members Up to 31 December 1991, Cambridge University Press, 1993, pg 28
  3. ^ a b Black, A and C (2015). "British Royal Family". Who's Who. Oxford University Press. Archived from the original on 21 February 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2015. Nicholas Charles Edward Jonathan, (Lord Nicholas Windsor), b 25 July 1970, Married 19 Oct. 2006, Princess Paola Doimi de Lupis Frankopan Šubić Zrinski
  4. ^ Lupis Macedonio Palermo di Santa Margherita, Marco (2014). "Le Linee di Dalmazia e Fiume". La Casata dei Lupi (in Italian). Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  5. ^ David Brown; et al. (30 September 2006). "Royal match that really is a fairytale". The Times. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  6. ^ Daily Telegraph, April 30 1997
  7. ^ Gesellschaft des Vaterländischen Museums in Böhmen (1827). Monatschrift der Gesellschaft des Vaterländischen Museums in Böhmen: 1827,2. Calve. p. 70.
  8. ^ Dr. Fr. Rački (1873). Acta conjurationem Bani Petri a Zorinio et Com. Fr. Frangepani illustrantia. Typis Car. Albrecht. p. 527.
  9. ^ Typis Regiæ Universitatis Budensis Calendarium (1801). Ecclesiasticae Et Seculares Regni Hungariae Dignitates. Typis Regiæ Universitatis Budensis. p. 41.
  10. ^ "Bribirski". Croatian Encyclopedia by Miroslav Krleža Institute of Lexicography (online edition). Retrieved 2017-10-28.
  11. ^ "Zrinski". Croatian Encyclopedia by Miroslav Krleža Institute of Lexicography (online edition). Retrieved 2017-10-28.
  12. ^ "Frankapan (Frankopan)". Croatian Encyclopedia by Miroslav Krleža Institute of Lexicography (online edition). Retrieved 2017-10-28.
  13. ^ "Subich de Berberio". Arcanum Database Ltd. Retrieved 2017-10-28.
  14. ^ "Von Zrin (Zrinski)". Arcanum Database Ltd. Retrieved 2017-10-28.
  15. ^ "Frangepán". Arcanum Database Ltd. Retrieved 2017-10-28.
  16. ^ "Šubić conti di Bribir". Treccani - Enciclopedia Italiana (online edition). Retrieved 2017-10-28.
  17. ^ "Zrínyi (croato Zrinski)". Treccani - Enciclopedia Italiana (online edition). Retrieved 2017-10-28.
  18. ^ "Frangipane (Frangipani)". Treccani - Enciclopedia Italiana (online edition). Retrieved 2017-10-28.
  19. ^ "Lažno predstavljanje - Jeste li znali da postoje princ i princeza Frankopan Šubić Zrinski". dubrovniknet.hr. 2012-10-25.
  20. ^ David Lowenthal (2015). The Past is a Foreign Country - Revisited. Cambridge University Press. p. 42.
  21. ^ http://arhiva.nacional.hr/clanak/13230/hrvatska-misija-laznih-frankopana
  22. ^ hrcak.srce.hr/file/44123
  23. ^ http://www.nacional.hr/clanak/13230/hrvatska-misija-laznih-frankopana
  24. ^ https://www.royal.uk/announcement-engagement-lord-nicholas-windsor
  25. ^ "Patrons: The Lady Nicholas Windsor, Paola Windsor". Home Renaissance Foundation. 2009. Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  26. ^ a b de Frankopan, Paola (28 April 2011). "My Royal Wedding: Paola de Frankopan Remembers Her Own Marriage into the British Royal Family". Vogue. Archived from the original on 9 January 2014. Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  27. ^ "Announcement of the engagement of Lord Nicholas Windsor". Buckingham Palace. 26 September 2006. Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  28. ^ Theroff, Paul (28 October 2006). "Royal News of 2006, Section I". Royal Genealogy Site. Archived from the original on 5 December 2014. Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  29. ^ "Wedding Wednesday: Valentino Gowns". The Royal Order of Sartorial Splendor. 22 August 2012. Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  30. ^ "Royal wedding at the Vatican". Independent Catholic News. 31 October 2006. Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  31. ^ Kay, Richard (3 October 2007). "Paola's a new royal mum". Daily Mail. London.
  32. ^ Theroff, Paul (8 March 2007). "Royal News of 2007, Section I". Royal Genealogy Site. Archived from the original on 5 December 2009. Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  33. ^ Leistra, Netty (2014). "Births and christenings in reigning and non-reigning royal houses of the year 2009". Netty Royal. Retrieved 21 July 2014.

External links[edit]

  • The family website La Casata dei Lupi, (Italian language), contains photos of Lord and Lady Nicholas, their first son Albert, and members of the Lupis family. Retrieved 26 September 2009.
  • Doimi de Lupis genealogy (Italian language) hosted by Società Genealogica Italiana – SGI (President- Marchese Marco Lupis) Retrieved 26 September 2009.