Lady of the Lake (brig)

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History
Name: Lady of the Lake
Fate: Wrecked off Cape St. Francis on 11 May 1833.
General characteristics
Type: Brig

Lady of the Lake was an Aberdeen-built brig that sank off the coast of Newfoundland in May 1833, with the loss of up to 265 passengers and crew.[1][2] Only fifteen passengers and crew survived [3]

Sinking[edit]

The vessel had departed from Belfast on 8 April 1833, bound for Quebec. At 8:00 a.m. on 11 May 1833, Lady of the Lake was struck by ice on the starboard bow and began to sink, about 400 kilometres (250 mi) east of Cape St. Francis, Newfoundland. One of the lifeboats capsized shortly after lowering, with the loss of an estimated 80 individuals. Lady of the Lake continued to sink with about 30 passengers clinging to the maintop mast. The survivors spent 75 hours in an open boat before being rescued by the ship Amazon.[4][5]

Sources differ as to the final death toll, with estimates ranging from 170[6] to 265.[7][4]

Voyages from 1829–1833[edit]

Departure Date Port of Departure Arrival Date Port of Arrival Master Remarks Consigned to
Sept 2, 1829 Dublin 22 October 1829 Quebec Stephens In Ballast H. Lemesurier & Co [8]
17 November 1829 Quebec ??? Galway Stephens H. Lemesurier & Co [8]
25 August 1830 Greenock 13 October 1830 Quebec Glederie In Ballast Rodger Dean & Co. [9]
16 November 1830 Quebec ??? Greenock Glederie Rodger Dean & Co [9]
2 April 1832 Aberdeen, Scotland 2 June 1832 Quebec Grant Transport 15 Settlers G.H. Parke [10]
27 August 1832 Belfast, Ireland 19 October 1832 Quebec Patterson At Grosse Isle on 16 October? G.H. Parke [10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Wreck of the Lady of the Lake". The Courier (Middlesex, London). 4 July 1833.
  2. ^ "Distressing Shipwrecks". The Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania). 18 June 1833.
  3. ^ http://ngb.chebucto.org/Articles/dis-lady-of-the-lake-1833.shtml
  4. ^ a b Thomas, R. (1848). Interesting and authentic narratives of the most remarkable shipwrecks, fires, famines, calamities, providential deliverances, and lamentable disasters on the seas: in most parts of the world. Silas Andrus & Son. p. 356-7.
  5. ^ 1833 - May Archived 23 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine, National Research Council of Canada.
  6. ^ Baehre, Rainer (1999). Outrageous Seas: Shipwreck and Survival in the Waters Off Newfoundland, 1583-1893 McGill-Queens. p. 36.
  7. ^ International Ice Patrol, United States Coast Guard History.
  8. ^ a b The Ship List, Ship Arrivals at the Port of Quebec, 1829 Archived 29 August 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ a b The Ship List, Ship Arrivals at the Port of Quebec, 1830 Archived 5 January 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ a b The Ship List, Ship Arrivals at the Port of Quebec, 1832 Archived 10 February 2012 at the Wayback Machine

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 46°50′N 47°10′W / 46.833°N 47.167°W / 46.833; -47.167