Lafayette Cemetery No. 1

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Lafayette Cemetery No. 1
Lafayette Cemetery No 1.jpg
Entrance gate to the cemetery.
Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 is located in Louisiana
Lafayette Cemetery No. 1
Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 is located in New Orleans
Lafayette Cemetery No. 1
Coordinates29°55′43″N 90°05′07″W / 29.928701°N 90.085361°W / 29.928701; -90.085361Coordinates: 29°55′43″N 90°05′07″W / 29.928701°N 90.085361°W / 29.928701; -90.085361
Built1833
ArchitectBenjamin Buisson
Architectural styleNeo-Classical
NRHP reference #72000559
Added to NRHP1972

Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 is a historic cemetery in the Garden District neighborhood of New Orleans, Louisiana. Founded in 1833 and still in use today, the cemetery takes its name from its location in what was once the City of Lafayette, a suburb of New Orleans that was annexed by the larger metropolis in 1852.[1][2] The city's first planned cemetery,[3] it is notable for the architectural significance of its tombs and mausoleums, often containing multiple family members, and for its layout, a cruciform plan that allowed for funeral processions.[4]

Confined within a single city block, the cemetery contains approximately 1,100 family tombs and 7,000 people.[5]

Conservation[edit]

The Cemetery was included in the National Register of Historic Places on February 1, 1972, for its architectural and social-historical importance.[6]

The World Monuments Fund placed Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 on its "Watch" list in 1996 due to the dilapidated state of some tombs, and it did so again in 2006 after Hurricane Katrina damaged much of the cemetery. The Fund subsequently partnered with Save Our Cemeteries, a nonprofit focussed on preserving Louisiana's historic cemeteries, and the Preservation Trades Network to repair tombs and restore the cemetery's landscape.[7] Save Our Cemeteries continues to advocate for the cemeteries and make repairs.[8]

Notable tombs[edit]

In popular culture[edit]

Literature[edit]

While promoting her novel Memnoch the Devil, author Anne Rice famously emerged from a coffin after riding through the cemetery. At the time, she lived in the nearby Garden District.

Movies[edit]

Films shot in the cemetery include:[9]

Other[edit]

Music videos by the following artists have been shot in the cemetery:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Save Our Cemeteries : Cemeteries of New Orleans : Cemeteries : Lafayette No. 1". www.saveourcemeteries.org. Retrieved 2018-11-14.
  2. ^ "The turbulent history behind the seven New Orleans municipal districts". NOLA.com. Retrieved 2018-11-14.
  3. ^ "Lafayette Cemetery No. 1". World Monuments Fund. Retrieved 2018-11-14.
  4. ^ "Save Our Cemeteries : Cemeteries of New Orleans : Cemeteries : Lafayette No. 1". www.saveourcemeteries.org. Retrieved 2018-11-14.
  5. ^ "Save Our Cemeteries : Cemeteries of New Orleans : Cemeteries : Lafayette No. 1". www.saveourcemeteries.org. Retrieved 2018-11-14.
  6. ^ "National Register Digital Assets". National Park Service. February 1, 1972.
  7. ^ "Lafayette Cemetery No. 1". World Monuments Fund. Retrieved 2018-11-14.
  8. ^ "Nonprofit Save Our Cemeteries repairs tombs at Lafayette Cemetery No. 2". NOLA.com. Retrieved 2018-11-14.
  9. ^ "IMDb: Titles with Location Matching "lafayette cemetery" (Sorted by Match Descending)". IMDb. Retrieved 2018-11-14.