Government of Lagos State

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Lagos State Government is the government of Lagos State, concerned with the administration of the state ministries.[1] The government consists of the executive, legislative and Judiciary.[2] The government is headed by the Governor who is the policy-maker and often assisted by the commissioners and other civil servants of the state.[3]

Office of the Governor[edit]

The Office of the Governor was created along with the creation of the state in 1967. It is currently headed by Akinwunmi Ambode, who is the fourteenth Governor of the State. This office is responsible for the effective coordination of all government activities for the good of the people of the State.[4]

The state vision is "Making Lagos Africa’s Model Mega City And Global Economic and Financial Hub", and the state policy thrust is "Poverty Eradication and Sustainable Economic Growth through Infrastructure Renewal and Development."[4]

Judiciary[edit]

The Judiciary is one of the three co-equal arms of the Lagos State Government. It is concerned with the interpretation of the laws of Lagos State government.[5] The judiciary is headed by the Chief Judge of Lagos State, appointed by the Lagos State Governor with the approval of the Lagos State House of Assembly.[6]

Distinguished members of the Judiciary include the Attorney-General and Lagos State Commissioner for Justice as well as the Chief Registrar.[7] The Chief Registrar serves as the head of administration and accountant to the judiciary.[8]

History of the judiciary[edit]

The Lagos State Judiciary was the first judiciary to be established in Nigeria, then known as the Colony Province Judiciary. The Magistrate Court was established first.[9] The establishment of the Magistrate Court gave birth to the High Court, the then Lagos State Supreme Court.[10] When the Supreme Court of Nigeria was founded, the Lagos Supreme Court metamorphosed into the High Court of the Federal Territory Lagos with the concurrent appointment of John Taylor as Chief Judge.[11]

On May 27, 1967, the same year Lagos State was formed, the High Court and the Magistrate Court of the Federal Territory were merged to form the Lagos State Judiciary under the leadership of John Taylor, the pioneer Chief Judge of Lagos State.[12][13] Taylor's tenure elapsed on November 7, 1973. He was succeeded by Justice Joseph Adefarasin, appointed on November 1, 1974.[14] He served in that capacity for 9 years until April 24, 1985, when his tenure ended.[15] He was succeeded by Justice Candide Adeyemi Johnson, appointed on April 25, 1985, a day after Justice Joseph left the office.[16] He spent 4 years in office and Justice Ligali Ayorinde succeeded him on July 10, 1989.[17] He served in that capacity for 6 years i.e. between July 1989 to April 1995.[18][19] On August 2014, Oluwafunmilayo Olajumoke Atilade was appointed as Chief Judge, sworn in by Ade Ipaye, Attorney General of Lagos State.[20][21][22]

Courts[edit]

The Lagos State courts consist of three levels of courts. The High Court is an appellate court that operates under discretionary review, meaning that the Court can choose which cases to hear by granting writs of certiorari.[23] It is the court of last resort.[24] The other two levels are the Magistrates and the Customary Court.[25]

In addition to the court, the judiciary also consists of the Judicial Service Commission, with statutory duties that include the promotion and appointment of judicial staff as well as other disciplinary functions.[26] The Chief Judge serves as the commission's chairman.[27]

Legislature[edit]

The legislature or state house assembly is one of the three co-equal arms of the State Government concerned with lawmaking. The legislature consists of elected members from each constituency of the state. The head of the legislature is the Speaker, who is elected by the house.[28]

The building of the legislature is situated inside the Lagos State Government house at Alausa in Ikeja central business district, Lagos State.[29][30]

The legislative function of the legislature is to make laws by passing bills, which must be endorsed by the two-third majority of the house. Following the endorsement by the two-third majority, the bill is presented to the Governor, who will sign the bill to become law. The assembly assess and approve the annual budget of the state government on presentation by the governor. The assembly also play a significant role in the appointment of the state commissioners, Chief Judges and other top officials by the Governor.[31][32]

Executive[edit]

The executive branch is one of the three co-equal arms of the State Government, concerned with policy making and implementation of bills.[33] The executive is responsible for the daily administration of the state.[34] Members of the executive include the Governor, deputy governors, and commissioners. There are also other top officials of the state, such as the head of service.[35]

The executives overseas the ministries. Each ministry is headed and coordinated by a commissioner, assisted by a permanent secretary.[36][37][38][39]

List of ministries and their commissioners[edit]

Ministry Incumbent commissioner
Finance Mustapha Akinkunmi
Economic Planning and Budget Akinyemi Ashade
Waterfront Infrastructure Development Adebowale Akinsanya
Commerce, Industry and Cooperatives Rotimi Ogunleye
Tourism and Culture Folorunsho Folarin-Coker
Education Oluranti Adebule
Science and Technology Olufemi Odubiyi
Youth, and Social Development Uzamat Akinbile-Yusuf
Environment Babatunde Adejare
Women Affairs and Poverty Alleviation Lola Akande
Health Olajide Idris
Housing Gbolahan Lawal
Local Government and Community Affairs Muslim Folami
Justice Adeniji Kazeem
Works and Infrastructure Ganiyu Johnson
Establishments, Training and Pensions Akintola Benson
Physical Planning and Urban Development Wasiu Anifowoshe
Energy and Mineral Resources Olawale Oluwo
Special Duties and Intergovernmental Relations Seye Oladejo
Information and Strategy Steve Ayorinde
Transport Dayo Mobereola
Home Affairs Abdul-Hakeem Abdul-Lateef
Wealth Creation and Employment Babatunde Durosimi-Etti
Agriculture Oluwatoyin Suarau

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ "Fashola Swears in Atilade as Lagos Chief Judge, Articles - THISDAY LIVE". thisdaylive.com. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 26 June 2015. 
  3. ^ "Lagos saves N100.7bn to pay debts". The Punch - Nigeria's Most Widely Read Newspaper. Retrieved 26 June 2015. 
  4. ^ a b "Akinwunmi Ambode – Governor of Lagos State". governor.lagosstate.gov.ng. Retrieved 2016-09-21. 
  5. ^ "Lagos judiciary workers suspend strike - Premium Times Nigeria". Premium Times Nigeria. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  6. ^ "Atilade makes history, succeeds sibling as acting Lagos Chief Judge". Vanguard News. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  7. ^ "former Lagos State Commissioner for Justice Prof. Yemi Osibajo. - Africa - News and Analysis". africajournalismtheworld.com. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
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  10. ^ "A Constitutional History of Nigeria". google.co.uk. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  11. ^ "The Audacity of Purpose, Articles - THISDAY LIVE". thisdaylive.com. Archived from the original on 1 July 2015. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  12. ^ Ajiroba Yemi Kotun. "Paving The Way". TheNigerianVoice. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  13. ^ "Learn About Lagos State, Nigeria - People, Local Government and Business Opportunities in Lagos". Overview of Nigeria -NgEX. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  14. ^ ADEBISI ONANUGA. "Mind your conduct, CJ tells magistrates". The Nation. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  15. ^ "Joseph Adetunji Adefarasin - Fundstellen im Internet - cyclopaedia.net". cyclopaedia.de. Archived from the original on 29 June 2015. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  16. ^ "ALB - Ring of diamonds: Africa's emerging centres of arbitration". africanlawbusiness.com. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  17. ^ "Charged with Contempt of Court By Femi Falana". Sahara Reporters. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  18. ^ "Memories of Biafran Nightmares, Articles - THISDAY LIVE". thisdaylive.com. Archived from the original on 1 July 2015. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
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  20. ^ "Lagos gets new Chief Judge". The Punch - Nigeria's Most Widely Read Newspaper. Archived from the original on 29 June 2015. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  21. ^ "Fashola Swears in Atilade as Lagos Chief Judge, Articles - THISDAY LIVE". thisdaylive.com. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
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  23. ^ "Slavery and the Birth of an African City". google.co.uk. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  24. ^ "Sources and Methods in African History". google.co.uk. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  25. ^ "LagosStateJudiciaryInBrief". nigeria-law.org. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  26. ^ "An Almanac of Contemporary and Convergent Judicial Restatements (ACCJR Compl ..." google.com. Retrieved 24 April 2015. 
  27. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-10-17. Retrieved 2015-04-24. 
  28. ^ "INTRIGUES THAT USHERED IN 7TH LAGOS ASSEMBLY". TheNigerianVoice. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  29. ^ "Lagos State House of Assembly - INFORMATION NIGERIA". informationng.com. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  30. ^ "APC Leaders At Lagos State House of Assembly Grant Themselves Lifetime Benefits, Opulent Allowances". Sahara Reporters. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  31. ^ "Lagos State Finances and Alpha Beta Ltd By Seyi Olu Awofeso". Sahara Reporters. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  32. ^ Oziegbe Okoeki. "Lagos sets pace with Assembly Commission". The Nation. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  33. ^ "Lagos Cabinet: Fashola Submits 37 Names to Assembly". Thisdaylive.com. Archived from the original on April 16, 2015. Retrieved June 27, 2015. 
  34. ^ "37 cabinet members take oath of office in Lagos". Vanguard News. Retrieved June 27, 2015. 
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  36. ^ "Lagos set to unveil new waterfront schemes". Vanguard News. Retrieved 2 March 2015. 
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  38. ^ "Lagos restates commitment to rural development". Thisdaylive.com. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 2 March 2015. 
  39. ^ "NYSC takes health initiative to rural dwellers". Vanguard News. Retrieved 2 March 2015.