Lahardane

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Lahardane
Leathardán
Village
Lahardane is located in Ireland
Lahardane
Lahardane
Location in Ireland
Coordinates: 54°02′00″N 9°19′20″W / 54.0333°N 9.3222°W / 54.0333; -9.3222Coordinates: 54°02′00″N 9°19′20″W / 54.0333°N 9.3222°W / 54.0333; -9.3222
Country Ireland
Province Connacht
County County Mayo
Elevation 47 m (154 ft)
Population (2016)
 • Total 178
Time zone UTC+0 (WET)
 • Summer (DST) UTC-1 (IST (WEST))
Irish Grid Reference G133101

Lahardane, also sometimes spelled Lahardaun (Irish: Leathardán, meaning "Half on Hill"),[1] is a small village in the parish of Addergoole, County Mayo, Ireland, adjacent to Lough Conn and to Nephin, and close to the towns of Crossmolina, Castlebar and Ballina. The 2016 census recorded a population of 178.[2]

History[edit]

Historically, the people of Lahardane and the surrounding area helped the French army under General Humbert during the 1798 uprising when the local priest, Fr Andrew Conroy, led French and Irish forces to Castlebar though the Windy Gap, a passage through the Mountains. The British forces had been expecting the French to go to Foxford first, and were caught off-guard. This led to the Races of Castlebar.[3] After the uprising was put down, Fr Conroy was hanged on the Mall in Castlebar, and likely buried in the old abbey in Addergoole cemetery.[citation needed] A Celtic cross now stands in Lahardane as a memorial these events. The cross was erected in 1937 by Michéal Ó Tiomanaidhe,[4] the Gaelic scholar, writer and folklore collector who was born in Addergoole parish on 20 September 1853.[citation needed] In October 2017, the Lahardane GAA team won the Mayo Junior Football Championship for the very first time,[5] and went on to win the Connacht Junior Football Championship in November 2017.[6]

Culture[edit]

Titanic Village[edit]

Addergoole parish suffered the largest proportionate loss for any locality probably in the world when the RMS Titanic sank in 1912. The 'Addergoole Fourteen' boarded the ship at Queenstown (Cobh).[7] Three survived the disaster.[8] There is a plaque in St Patrick's Church, Lahardane to the memory of the fourteen, as well as a memorial garden filled with sculptures to honour their memory.[9]

Fair Day[edit]

The history of the Lahardane Fair goes back to around 1900. It was a traditional Harvest Festival, as was practised in the West of Ireland at the time, and it was always held on 15 August, a feast day and religious holiday. At that time, it was noted for its tradition in which local farmers hired younger labourers, and was sometimes known as the 'Hiring Fair'.[citation needed] This tradition died out in the 1920s, and it became a traditional day for the sale of cattle and sheep.[citation needed] This situation prevailed into the 1970s.[citation needed] Later, the Lahardane Parents Council decided to revive the Fair Day,[citation needed] and kept tradition with 15 August (resisting the temptation to move it to the nearest weekend).[citation needed] It now runs as a fundraising event for the local national (primary) school.[10]

Sport[edit]

The local Gaelic football team is the Lahardane McHales GAA.[11] Founded in 1966 [12], Lahardane McHales is made up of players drawn from across the parish of Addergoole. The club won their first Mayo Junior title in 2017 defeating Kilmaine. They subsequently went on to win the Connacht Junior Football Championship, beating Ballymote of Sligo 1-15 to 3-05. [13]

People[edit]

  • John MacHale, Catholic Archbishop of Tuam, and Irish nationalist, for whom the local gaelic football derives their name from. Born and raised in the area. [14]

Lahardane in fiction[edit]

Lahardane is the name of the house in the 2002 novel, The Story of Lucy Gault, by William Trevor. The novel is set on the south coast of Ireland and, other than the name, there is no connection with the Mayo village.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Leathardán / Lahardaun / Lahardane". Logainm.ie. Irish Placenames Commission. Retrieved 6 January 2018. 
  2. ^ "SAPMAP Area - Settlements - Lahardane, County Mayo". 2016 Census. Central Statistics Office (Ireland). 2016. Retrieved 23 December 2017. 
  3. ^ Gribayedoff, Valerian (1890). The French Invasion of Ireland '98. Chapter 5. 
  4. ^ "1978 Monument Lahardane Co.Mayo". Buildings of Ireland. National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. 
  5. ^ "Lahardane make the big breakthrough". MayoNews.ie. Mayo News. 10 October 2017. Retrieved 23 December 2017. 
  6. ^ "Connacht JFC final: More history for Maughan's men". Independent.ie. Independent News & Media. 20 November 2017. Retrieved 23 December 2017. 
  7. ^ "Addergoole Titanic Society". Addergoole-Titanic.com. Retrieved 2 December 2017. 
  8. ^ "Titanic Bell Ringing Ceremony 2010". Podcasts.ie. Archived from the original on 10 January 2011. 
  9. ^ "Addergoole Fourteen - Origin and Location". AddergooleFourteen.com. Archived from the original on 8 February 2012. 
  10. ^ "Lahardane Fair Day - One of North Mayo's oldest and best-loved festivals". NorthMayo.ie. Moy Valley Resources IRD. Retrieved 23 December 2017. 
  11. ^ http://lahardanemachalesgaa.com/about/
  12. ^ https://lahardanemachalesgaa.com/history-3/
  13. ^ http://www.con-telegraph.ie/news/roundup/articles/2017/11/19/4148712-lahardane-write-glorious-new-chapter-in-club-history/
  14. ^ http://www.castlebar.ie/mayo_historical_and_archaeological_society/mhas-20050529.shtml