Lake Vyalozero

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Lake Vyalozero
Lake Vyalozero NASA.jpg
from space
Lake Vyalozero is located in Murmansk Oblast
Lake Vyalozero
Lake Vyalozero
Lake Vyalozero is located in Russia
Lake Vyalozero
Lake Vyalozero
LocationKola Peninsula, Murmansk Oblast
Coordinates66°50′23″N 35°10′22″E / 66.8397222°N 35.1727778°E / 66.8397222; 35.1727778Coordinates: 66°50′23″N 35°10′22″E / 66.8397222°N 35.1727778°E / 66.8397222; 35.1727778
Primary outflowsVyala River
Basin countriesRussia
Surface area98.6 km2 (38.1 sq mi)
Water volume0.8 km3 (0.19 cu mi)[1]
Surface elevation116 m (381 ft)

Lake Vyalozero (Russian: Вялозеро) is a large freshwater lake on the Kola Peninsula, Murmansk Oblast, Russia. The lake is mesotropic, with a slower water exchange than the neighboring Lake Inari.[2] It has an area of 98.6 km². Vyala River, a tributary of the Umba, flows from the lake.

Ecology

Along with other lakes in northwestern Russia, Lake Vyalozero lay on the path of airborne radiation following the Chernobyl disaster. In 1998, 12 years after the Chernobyl disaster, Lake Vyalozero contained 1.8 times the amount of Cesium-137 than Lake Inari.

Some paleoglaciologists have suggested that the Lake Vyalozero-Munozero was the western extent of the Fenno-Scandian ice sheet, though this has been disputed.[3]

References

  1. ^ Bakunov, N. A.; Bolshiyanov, D. Yu.; Makarov, A. S.; Fedorov, G. B. (2010-05-01). "Problems in predicting 137Cs levels in lake waters of eastern Fennoscandia". Russian Journal of Ecology. 41 (3): 225–228. doi:10.1134/S1067413610030057. ISSN 1608-3334.
  2. ^ Bakunov, N. A.; Bol’shiyanov, D. Yu.; Pravkin, S. A. (2021-05-01). "Reproduction of Lake Water Purification from Chernobyl 137Сs in Eastern Fennoscandia". Water Resources. 48 (3): 397–403. doi:10.1134/S0097807821030040. ISSN 1608-344X.
  3. ^ Hāttestrand, Clas; Kolka, Vasili; Stroeven, Arjen P. (November 2007). "The Keiva ice marginal zone on the Kola Peninsula, northwest Russia: a key component for reconstructing the palaeoglaciology of the northeastern Fennoscandian Ice Sheet". Boreas. 36 (4): 352–370. doi:10.1080/03009480701317488.