Lake County, Minnesota

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Lake County, MN)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Lake County
Lake County Courthouse
Map of Minnesota highlighting Lake County
Location within the U.S. state of Minnesota
Map of the United States highlighting Minnesota
Minnesota's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 47°32′N 91°23′W / 47.53°N 91.39°W / 47.53; -91.39
Country United States
State Minnesota
FoundedMarch 1, 1856[1]
Named forLake Superior
SeatTwo Harbors
Largest cityTwo Harbors
Area
 • Total2,991 sq mi (7,750 km2)
 • Land2,109 sq mi (5,460 km2)
 • Water881 sq mi (2,280 km2)  29%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total10,905
 • Estimate 
(2021)
10,986 Increase
 • Density5.2/sq mi (2.0/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district8th
Websitewww.co.lake.mn.us

Lake County is a county in the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of the 2020 census, the population was 10,905.[2] Its county seat is Two Harbors.[3]

History[edit]

Prior to the arrival of Europeans, the area had long been inhabited by Native American groups. At the time of European contact, the principal Native American groups in the region were the Dakota (Sioux) and Ojibwe (also called Anishinabe or Chippewa). The economy of these groups was based on hunting, fishing and gathering, with wild rice being of particular importance. The first Europeans to explore the area were the French in the late 17th century[4] who were followed by trappers, fur traders, missionaries, and explorers.

The Wisconsin Territory was established by the Federal Government effective July 3, 1836, and existed until its eastern portion was granted statehood (as Wisconsin) in 1848. Therefore, the Federal Government set up the Minnesota Territory effective March 3, 1849. The newly organized territorial legislature created nine counties across the territory in October of that year. One of those original counties, Itasca, had its eastern section partitioned off on February 20, 1855 into two new counties: the western part was designated Newton and the eastern part was named Superior County. The territorial legislature returned to the matter on March 3, changing Superior County to Saint Louis County. Then on March 1, 1856, the county name was again changed, to Lake County, and the "Saint Louis County" name was given to the previous Newton County. With the new name came the designation of county seat at Beaver Bay, which had first been platted in 1856. The county's boundaries were altered in 1874, when its eastern part was partitioned off to create Cook County.

In 1868, iron ore was discovered on the Vermilion Range by George Stuntz. A spur of the Duluth and Iron Range Railroad was extended to the Lake Superior shore, and a settlement quickly sprang up at the terminus. This settlement was incorporated as a village (Two Harbors) on March 9, 1888, and that same year a vote was taken to transfer the county seat from Beaver Bay to Two Harbors (1888).[5]

Commercial fishing on Lake Superior became important during the late 1880s, spurred by the arrival of Swedish and Norwegian immigrants to the North Shore. In 1890, the Merritt brothers discovered the Mesabi Range. The Two Harbors Lighthouse was built on Agate Bay in 1892. Ten years later, five Two Harbors businessmen signed the articles of incorporation for a new mining company named 3M. Today, 3M Corporation has over 70,000 employees worldwide and produces more than 50,000 adhesive household products, now has its headquarters in Saint Paul.

In 1906, the Court House, which stands to this day, was built. In 1907, one of the nation's first steel ore docks was built in Two Harbors. In 1944, one of the first HMOs in the United States was created in Lake County to serve railroad employees. A second iron ore boom took place in the 1950s with the development of the taconite beneficiation process for turning lean, low-grade iron ore into a shippable product.

In 2021, the Greenwood Fire burned over 10,500 acres of the county southwest of Isabella, beginning near Greenwood Lake.[6][7]

Geography[edit]

Lake County lies on the north side of Minnesota. Its north border abuts the south border of the province of Ontario, Canada, and its south border is formed by Lake Superior. Its terrain consists of rolling mountains and hills, heavily wooded, and dotted with lakes and ponds.[8] The terrain slopes both ways from a crestline that runs from its northeast line to its southwest line; the county's highest point is Stony Tower Hill[8] at 2,301' ASL.[9] The county has a total area of 2,991 square miles (7,750 km2), of which 2,109 square miles (5,460 km2) is land and 881 square miles (2,280 km2) (29%) is water.[10] It is the fifth-largest county in Minnesota by area.

Lake County is located in the Arrowhead Region of Northeastern Minnesota.

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Protected areas[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860248
1870135−45.6%
1880106−21.5%
18901,2991,125.5%
19004,654258.3%
19108,01172.1%
19208,2513.0%
19307,068−14.3%
19406,956−1.6%
19507,78111.9%
196013,70276.1%
197013,351−2.6%
198013,043−2.3%
199010,415−20.1%
200011,0586.2%
201010,866−1.7%
202010,9050.4%
2021 (est.)10,986[11]0.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]
1790-1960[13] 1900-1990[14]
1990-2000[15] 2010-2020[2]
Age pyramid of county residents based on 2000 census data

2000 census[edit]

As of the 2000 census, there were 11,058 people, 4,646 households, and 3,140 families in the county. The population density was 5.24/sqmi (2.02/km2). There were 6,840 housing units at an average density of 3.24/sqmi (1.25/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.99% White, 0.10% Black or African American, 0.70% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.14% from other races, and 0.88% from two or more races. 0.57% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 22.3% were of Norwegian, 17.8% German, 14.3% Swedish, 8.4% Finnish, 6.3% Irish and 5.4% English ancestry.

There were 4,646 households, out of which 27.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.80% were married couples living together, 6.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.40% were non-families. 28.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.83.

The county population contained 22.30% under the age of 18, 6.60% from 18 to 24, 24.50% from 25 to 44, 26.70% from 45 to 64, and 20.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 99.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,402, and the median income for a family was $46,980. Males had a median income of $39,719 versus $26,500 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,761. About 5.50% of families and 7.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.40% of those under age 18 and 5.70% of those age 65 or over.

Government and Politics[edit]

Lake County has a historic Democratic/Labor lean. It was the top county for Socialist Party of America candidate Eugene V. Debs in 1908,[16] 1912,[17] and 1920.[18] The last Republican to carry the county was Herbert Hoover’s failed run for re-election in 1932,[19] although in the 1932 election Socialist Norman Thomas received 19.32% of the county’s vote, one of the highest percentages in the country.[20] Ironically, Lake County was the only county in Minnesota to vote for Hoover in 1932. In 2016, Lake County was the whitest county in the entire country to vote for Democrat Hillary Clinton over Republican Donald Trump.[21] Trump, however, got the highest percentage of the vote of any Republican since 1928.

United States presidential election results for Lake County, Minnesota[22]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 3,393 47.11% 3,647 50.64% 162 2.25%
2016 2,932 44.96% 3,077 47.19% 512 7.85%
2012 2,610 38.27% 4,043 59.28% 167 2.45%
2008 2,636 37.82% 4,174 59.89% 159 2.28%
2004 2,769 39.16% 4,212 59.57% 90 1.27%
2000 2,465 37.56% 3,579 54.53% 519 7.91%
1996 1,684 27.93% 3,388 56.20% 957 15.87%
1992 1,465 23.05% 3,415 53.72% 1,477 23.23%
1988 1,838 31.83% 3,887 67.31% 50 0.87%
1984 2,003 30.68% 4,468 68.43% 58 0.89%
1980 2,414 34.83% 3,864 55.75% 653 9.42%
1976 2,313 35.05% 3,973 60.21% 313 4.74%
1972 2,575 40.70% 3,640 57.53% 112 1.77%
1968 1,351 22.93% 4,266 72.42% 274 4.65%
1964 1,205 20.34% 4,704 79.39% 16 0.27%
1960 2,276 36.83% 3,888 62.91% 16 0.26%
1956 2,055 39.96% 3,079 59.87% 9 0.17%
1952 1,451 33.83% 2,814 65.61% 24 0.56%
1948 924 24.78% 2,555 68.52% 250 6.70%
1944 792 24.45% 2,401 74.13% 46 1.42%
1940 933 24.99% 2,750 73.67% 50 1.34%
1936 617 18.20% 2,717 80.15% 56 1.65%
1932 1,290 42.97% 1,059 35.28% 653 21.75%
1928 2,014 72.84% 618 22.35% 133 4.81%
1924 1,251 46.63% 60 2.24% 1,372 51.14%
1920 990 40.93% 594 24.56% 835 34.52%
1916 401 30.22% 506 38.13% 420 31.65%
1912 182 14.38% 195 15.40% 889 70.22%
1908 584 51.23% 152 13.33% 404 35.44%
1904 603 67.45% 77 8.61% 214 23.94%
1900 639 66.98% 278 29.14% 37 3.88%
1896 595 64.05% 320 34.45% 14 1.51%
1892 290 60.04% 126 26.09% 67 13.87%


County Board of Commissioners[23]
Position Name District Term Ending
Commissioner Pete Walsh District 1 2022
Commissioner Derrick Goutermont District 2 2020
Commissioner Richard Hogenson District 3 2020
Commissioner and Vice Chair Jeremy Hurd District 4 2022
Commissioner and Chairperson Rich Sve District 5 2020
State Legislature (2018-2020)
Position Name Affiliation District
  Senate Tom Bakk[24] Independent District 3
  House of Representatives Rob Ecklund[25] Democrat District 3A
  House of Representatives Mary Murphy[26] Democrat District 3B
U.S Congress (2018-2020)
Position Name Affiliation District
  House of Representatives Pete Stauber[27] Republican 8th
  Senate Amy Klobuchar[28] Democrat N/A
  Senate Tina Smith[29] Democrat N/A

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Ghost towns[edit]

  • Avon
  • Avoy
  • Beaver
  • Britton
  • Buell
  • Case
  • Clark
  • Crystal
  • Darby Junction
  • Drummond
  • Eclfo
  • Emetta
  • Fernburg Tower
  • Forest Center
  • Freedom
  • Green
  • Greenwood Junction
  • Howlett
  • Jordan
  • Kent
  • London
  • Malmota (Marmata)
  • Maple
  • Marble Lake
  • Moose
  • Morris
  • Murfin
  • Nigadoo
  • Norshore Junction
  • North Branch
  • Riblet
  • Scott Junction
  • Silver
  • Splitrock
  • Stafford
  • Summit
  • Swift
  • Thomas
  • Wanless
  • Westover
  • Whyte
  • Wolf
  • York

Townships[edit]

Unorganized territories[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Minnesota Place Names". Minnesota Historical Society. Archived from the original on June 20, 2012. Retrieved March 18, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Lake County, Minnesota". www.census.gov. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 4, 2022.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ "MNHS "Time Line"". Archived from the original on September 17, 2006. Retrieved August 11, 2009.
  5. ^ Upham, Warren. Minnesota Geographic Names (1920), pp. 293-96 (accessed April 23, 2019)
  6. ^ Hollingsworth, Jana (August 23, 2021). "Minnesota's largest wildfire likened to a 'freight train' as it grows, spurs more evacuations". Star Tribune. Retrieved August 24, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  7. ^ "Greenwood Fire expected to cross Highway 1; more evacuations begin". Duluth News Tribune. August 23, 2021. Retrieved August 24, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. ^ a b c Lake County MN Google Maps (accessed April 23, 2019)
  9. ^ PeakBagger.com "Lake County MN" (accessed April 23, 2019)
  10. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  11. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021". Retrieved April 4, 2022.
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  14. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  16. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of US Presidential Elections for 1908". Retrieved September 19, 2018.
  17. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of US Presidential Elections for 1912". Retrieved September 19, 2018.
  18. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of US Presidential Elections for 1920". Retrieved September 19, 2018.
  19. ^ "Presidential election of 1932 - Map by counties". geoelections.free.fr. Retrieved September 19, 2018.
  20. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of US Presidential Elections for 1932". Retrieved September 19, 2018.
  21. ^ "Election Day 2016 by the numbers - News, Sports, Jobs - Adirondack Daily Enterprise". www.adirondackdailyenterprise.com. Retrieved September 19, 2018.
  22. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved September 19, 2018.
  23. ^ "Welcome To Lake County, MN". www.co.lake.mn.us. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  24. ^ "MN State Senate". www.senate.mn. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  25. ^ "Rep. Rob Ecklund (03A) - Minnesota House of Representatives". www.house.leg.state.mn.us. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  26. ^ "Rep. Mary Murphy (03B) - Minnesota House of Representatives". www.house.leg.state.mn.us. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  27. ^ "Representative Pete Stauber". Representative Pete Stauber. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  28. ^ "U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar". www.klobuchar.senate.gov. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  29. ^ "Home". Senator Tina Smith. Retrieved June 24, 2020.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 47°32′N 91°23′W / 47.53°N 91.39°W / 47.53; -91.39