Laleh Khalili

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Laleh Khalili is an Iranian American and Professor in Middle Eastern Politics at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. She received her PhD from Columbia University. Her primary research areas are logistics and trade, infrastructure, policing and incarceration, gender, nationalism, political and social movements, refugees, and diasporas in the Middle East.[1] Her commentary on Middle Eastern and Iranian affairs has been used in several newspapers, including the Washington Post,[2] the San Francisco Chronicle,[3] the Chicago Tribune, the Financial Times, and Agence France-Presse. Khalili writes regularly for Iranian.com.

Laleh Khalili is part of the anti-racist coalition that reviewed an article by Kamel Daoud on violence against women in Cologne. The collective argued that Daoud used stereotypes and orientalist themes.[4] Following the collective pressures, Kamel Daoud stopped his work as a journalist.

Books[edit]

  • Time in the Shadows: Confinement in Counterinsurgencies. Stanford University Press, USA ; Palo Alto :,[5] 2013.
  • Policing and Prisons in the Middle East: Formations of Coercion (co-edited with Jillian Schwedler). Hurst & Co, UK ; London and Columbia University Press, USA, New York :,[6] 2013.
  • Heroes and martyrs of Palestine : the politics of national commemoration. Cambridge, UK ; New York :,[7] 2007.

Scholarly Articles[edit]

  • “'Fighting Over Drones'” (2012). Middle East Report 264 (Fall): pp. 18–22.[8]
  • "'Gendered Practices of Counterinsurgency'" (2011). Review of International Studies37(4): 1471-1491.[9]
  • “'The New (and Old) Classics of Counterinsurgency'” (2010) Middle East Report 255 (Summer): pp. 14–23.[10]
  • “'The Location of Palestine in Global Counterinsurgencies'” (2010). International Journal of Middle East Studies 42(3): pp. 413–433.[11]
  • “'On Torture'” (2008). Middle East Report 249 (Winter): pp. 32–38.[12]
  • "‘Standing with My Brother’: Hizbullah, Palestinians, and the Limits of Solidarity'" (2007). Comparative Studies in Society and History 49(2):276–303.[13]
  • "Places of Memory and Mourning: Palestinian Commemoration in the Refugee Camps of Lebanon". Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East [14] - Volume 25, Number 1, 2005, pp. 30–45

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.soas.ac.uk/staff/staff36189.php School of Oriental and African Studies University of London
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ "Travel Magazine puts Berkeley Publisher on Literary Map", Rona Marech. San Francisco Chronicle August 25, 2000
  4. ^ "le Monde" http://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2016/02/11/les-fantasmes-de-kamel-daoud_4863096_3232.html
  5. ^ Stanford University Press
  6. ^ Hurst & Co.
  7. ^ Cambridge University Press
  8. ^ Middle East Reports
  9. ^ Cambridge Journals
  10. ^ Middle East Report
  11. ^ Cambridge Journals
  12. ^ Middle East Report
  13. ^ Cambridge Journals
  14. ^ Duke University Press