Lambda1 Tucanae

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Lambda1 Tucanae
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Tucana
λ1 Tuc A
Right ascension  00h 52m 24.5198s[1]
Declination −69° 30′ 13.5440″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 6.70[2]
λ1 Tuc B
Right ascension  00h 52m 28.3487s[3]
Declination −69° 30′ 10.3819″[3]
Apparent magnitude (V) 7.35[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type F7 IV-V[4]
U−B color index +0.07[5]
B−V color index +0.55[5]
Astrometry
λ1 Tuc A
Radial velocity (Rv)+29.4±0.2[6] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 3.849±0.050[1] mas/yr
Dec.: −67.462±0.040[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π)16.4907 ± 0.0293[1] mas
Distance197.8 ± 0.4 ly
(60.6 ± 0.1 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV)+2.68[7]
λ1 Tuc B
Proper motion (μ) RA: 9.966±0.062[3] mas/yr
Dec.: −79.096±0.052[3] mas/yr
Parallax (π)16.5242 ± 0.0361[3] mas
Distance197.4 ± 0.4 ly
(60.5 ± 0.1 pc)
Details
λ1 Tuc A
Mass1.55[8] M
Luminosity7[9] L
Surface gravity (log g)3.90[10] cgs
Temperature6,325[10] K
Metallicity [Fe/H]+0.09[10] dex
Age2.6[10] Gyr
λ1 Tuc B
Mass1.38[8] M
Other designations
DUN 2, λ1 Tuc, CCDM J00524-6930AB, WDS J00524-6930AB[11]
λ1 Tuc A: λ1 Tucanae A, CPD−70 37, HD 5190, HIP 4084, HR 252, SAO 248269, WDS J00524-6930A[11]
λ1 Tuc B: λ1 Tucanae B, CPD−70 38, HD 5208, HIP 4088, SAO 248271, WDS J00524-6930B[11]
Database references
SIMBADdata

Lambda1 Tucanae is the Bayer designation for a pair of stars sharing a common proper motion[8] through space, which lie within the southern constellation of Tucana. As of 2013, the pair had an angular separation of 20.0 arc seconds along a position angle of 82°.[2] Together, they are barely visible to the naked eye with a combined apparent visual magnitude of 6.21.[5] Based upon an annual parallax shift for both stars of approximately 16.5[1][3] mas as seen from Earth, this system is located roughly 198 light years from the Sun.

The brighter member, component A, is a magnitude 6.70[2] F-type star with a stellar classification of F7 IV-V.[4] The luminosity class may indicate that, at the age of 2.6 billion years,[10] it is beginning to evolve away from the main sequence. It has an estimated 1.55[8] times the mass of the Sun and is radiating 7[9] times the solar luminosity from its photosphere at an effective temperature of 6,325 K.[10] The magnitude 7.35[2] companion, component B, has 1.38[8] times the mass of the Sun. If the pair are gravitationally bound, then their estimated orbital period is 27,000 years.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Brown, A. G. A.; et al. (Gaia collaboration) (August 2018). "Gaia Data Release 2: Summary of the contents and survey properties". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 616. A1. arXiv:1804.09365. Bibcode:2018A&A...616A...1G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201833051. Gaia DR2 record for this source at VizieR.
  2. ^ a b c d e Mason, B. D.; et al. (2014), The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, Bibcode:2001AJ....122.3466M, doi:10.1086/323920.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Brown, A. G. A.; et al. (Gaia collaboration) (August 2018). "Gaia Data Release 2: Summary of the contents and survey properties". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 616. A1. arXiv:1804.09365. Bibcode:2018A&A...616A...1G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201833051. Gaia DR2 record for this source at VizieR.
  4. ^ a b Houk, Nancy (1979), Michigan catalogue of two-dimensional spectral types for the HD stars, 1, Ann Arbor, Michigan: Dept. of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Bibcode:1978mcts.book.....H.
  5. ^ a b c Cousins, A. W. J.; Lagerweij, H. C. (1971), "UBV Observations of Variable Stars", Monthly Notes of the Astronomical Society of Southern Africa, 30: 12, Bibcode:1971MNSSA..30...12C.
  6. ^ de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Eilers, A.-C. (October 2012), "Radial velocities for the HIPPARCOS-Gaia Hundred-Thousand-Proper-Motion project", Astronomy & Astrophysics, 546: 14, arXiv:1208.3048, Bibcode:2012A&A...546A..61D, doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219219, A61.
  7. ^ Anderson, E.; Francis, Ch. (2012), "XHIP: An extended hipparcos compilation", Astronomy Letters, 38 (5): 331, arXiv:1108.4971, Bibcode:2012AstL...38..331A, doi:10.1134/S1063773712050015.
  8. ^ a b c d e f Tokovinin, Andrei (2014), "From Binaries to Multiples. II. Hierarchical Multiplicity of F and G Dwarfs", The Astronomical Journal, 147 (4): 14, arXiv:1401.6827, Bibcode:2014AJ....147...87T, doi:10.1088/0004-6256/147/4/87, 87.
  9. ^ a b McDonald, I.; et al. (2012), "Fundamental Parameters and Infrared Excesses of Hipparcos Stars", Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 427 (1): 343–57, arXiv:1208.2037, Bibcode:2012MNRAS.427..343M, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.21873.x.
  10. ^ a b c d e f Casagrande, L.; et al. (2011), "New constraints on the chemical evolution of the solar neighbourhood and Galactic disc(s). Improved astrophysical parameters for the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey", Astronomy & Astrophysics, 530 (A138): 21, arXiv:1103.4651, Bibcode:2011A&A...530A.138C, doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201016276.
  11. ^ a b c "Lambda1 Tucanae". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2018-11-26.