Lambda Kappa Sigma

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Lambda Kappa Sigma
ΛΚΣ
The Coat of Arms of Lambda Kappa Sigma
Founded14 October 1913; 105 years ago (14 October 1913)
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, Boston, Massachusetts
TypeProfessional
EmphasisPharmacy
ScopeInternational
MottoEsse Quam Videri ("To be, rather than to seem")
ColorsOld Gold and Columbia Blue
SymbolCaduceus
FlowerYellow Chrysanthemum
MascotLamb
PhilanthropyProject Hope
Chapters44 chapters, 36 alumni
FounderEthel J. Heath
HeadquartersS77 W16906 Casey Drive
Muskego, Wisconsin
USA
WebsiteLambda Kappa Sigma

Lambda Kappa Sigma (ΛΚΣ or LKS) is an international pharmacy fraternity headquartered in Muskego, Wisconsin. Founded in 1913, it was created to promote the profession of pharmacy among women and advance women within the profession. LKS is the oldest and largest professional pharmacy fraternity for women in the world.[citation needed] Lambda Kappa Sigma has initiated more than 30,000 members and has 44 chartered chapters. LKS also has 36 chartered alumni groups internationally.

Overview[edit]

Lambda Kappa Sigma is dedicated to developing the intellectual, leadership, and professional skills of its members. LKS promotes professional growth and its educational programs enhance professional development in the field of pharmacy, with an emphasis placed on women's health issues. Continuing education credits are also available. LKS also has an Educational Grant Program.

History[edit]

On October 14, 1913, Ethel J. Heath and eight other female students at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy organized Lambda Kappa Society, a social club. Charter members were Ethel J. Heath, Annabel Carter Jones, Mary Connolly Livingston, Emma MacDonnell Cronin, Willette McKeever Cheever, Mary Durgin Loveland, Alice G. Coleman, Margaret M. Curran, and Rosemond A. Guinn.

In 1915 the organization ceased being a luncheon club and was opened to all members of the college. Sigma was added to the name, and the official badge, motto, flower, and colors were selected. In 1919 the official coat-of-arms, designed by Cora E. Craven, was adopted.

The first national convention was held in Boston, Massachusetts in 1926. The Tau Chapter founded at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania March 18, 1932. An official prayer was presented by the Eta Chapter and Delta Chapter presented a song to be used as the official sorority song. Both the prayer and the song were adopted for national use in 1950.

The Silver Anniversary Convention was held in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1938. At that convention the delegates voted to join the Professional Panhellenic Association, becoming the first pharmaceutical sorority in the PPA.

On April 28, 1956 ΛΚΣ became international with the addition of the Alpha Lambda chapter in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada on the campus of the University of British Columbia.

The 1982 biennial convention was held at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with the Delta Collegiate (University of Pittsburgh), Tau Collegiate (Duquesne University), and Tau Alumni chapters as hosts.[1]

The 1996 biennial convention was held in St. Louis, Missouri, with the Alpha Zeta Collegiate and Alumni chapters as hosts.

During the 1988 biennial convention, the members voted to delete all gender references from the fraternity's membership requirements. The fraternity was now open to both male and female members, following a twelve-year battle to legally remain a fraternity for women only.[2]

Chapters[edit]

Collegiate[edit]

Alumni[edit]

[3] [4]

Publications[edit]

  • Blue and Gold Triangle - Official publication of fraternity (established 1926)
  • Alumni News - Informational alumni-only mailing
  • LinKS - Official publication of student chapters and advisors[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chapter, Tau. "The History of Lambda Kappa Sigma". Archived from the original on 2009-10-26. Retrieved 2007-05-03.
  2. ^ "Member Manual : 2010 Interim Edition" (PDF). Lks.org. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  3. ^ a b Rhodes, Jennifer. "LKS". Lks.org. Retrieved 2007-05-03.
  4. ^ Savage, Lisa. "LKS". Lks.org. Retrieved 2011-10-17.

External links[edit]