Landroff

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Landroff
The church in Landroff
The church in Landroff
Coat of arms of Landroff
Coat of arms
Location of Landroff
Landroff is located in France
Landroff
Landroff
Landroff is located in Grand Est
Landroff
Landroff
Coordinates: 48°58′05″N 6°36′43″E / 48.9681°N 6.6119°E / 48.9681; 6.6119Coordinates: 48°58′05″N 6°36′43″E / 48.9681°N 6.6119°E / 48.9681; 6.6119
CountryFrance
RegionGrand Est
DepartmentMoselle
ArrondissementForbach-Boulay-Moselle
CantonSarralbe
IntercommunalityCommunauté de communes du Centre mosellan
Government
 • Mayor (2008–2014) Jean-Marie Clément
Area
1
7.73 km2 (2.98 sq mi)
Population
 (2017-01-01)[1]
271
 • Density35/km2 (91/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
57379 /57340
Elevation238–305 m (781–1,001 ft)
(avg. 245 m or 804 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

Landroff (German: Landorf) is a commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Historical Significance[edit]

Landroff was the site of a sharp but brief battle during World War II on 14–15 November 1944 between elements of the U.S. 6th Armored Division and the German 36th Volksgrenadier Division led by the 87th Grenadier Regiment.[2] Elements of the U.S. 68th Tank Battalion liberated the town on 14 November. Beginning that evening at 1800, the 68th repulsed the first of four increasingly violent and determined German counterattacks. The others followed at 2100, 2300, and finally at 0130 on 15 November. B Company, 44th Armored Infantry Battalion reinforced the 68th after the second counterattack. During the final counterattack German forces cut the road to the west of the town and, in the darkness, infiltrated into Landroff proper, where the battle devolved into a hand-to-hand melee that lasted until dawn.[3]

For his role in organizing the defense of the town, the 68th Tank Battalion's S-3 (Operations Officer), Captain Daniel E. Smith, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.[3][4] Technical Sergeant Herbert S. Latimer, B Company, 44th Armored Infantry Battalion was also awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for heroism and gallantry in action for leading his platoon when all senior officers and sergeants of the platoon were either killed or wounded.[5][6]

A Company, 68th Tank Battalion was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for its actions in defending the town.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Populations légales 2017". INSEE. Retrieved 6 January 2020.
  2. ^ Cole, Hugh M. (1950). The Lorraine Campaign. Washington, DC: The Historical Division, The U.S. Army. pp. 369–379.
  3. ^ a b "The November–December Offensive". Super Sixth: The Story of Patton's 6th Armored Division in WW II. External link in |publisher= (help)
  4. ^ "World War II Recipients of the Distinguished Service Cross".
  5. ^ "World War II Recipients of the Distinguished Service Cross".
  6. ^ Cole, Hugh M. (1950). The Lorraine Campaign. Washington, DC: The Historical Division, The U.S. Army. pp. Ch. 7 end notes.
  7. ^ Sawicki, James A. (1983). Tank Battalions of the U.S. Army. Dumfries, VA: Wyvern Press. ISBN 0-9602404-5-4.