Language Acquisition Device (computer)

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The Language Acquisition Device is a computer program developed by Lobal Technologies, a computer company in the United Kingdom, and scientists from King's College. It emulates the functions of the brain's frontal lobes where humans process language and emotion.[1]

Scientists hope this might enable computers to understand, speak, learn, and eventually think. One possible use is in interactive entertainment such as video gaming, where the technology is used to help computer-controlled characters to develop.[1] A press release describing this technology produced widespread media interest in 2002, but no reports have been published since then, and the current status of the technology is unclear.

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External links, references[edit]

  1. ^ a b Games to take on a life of their own: Copying the brain's neural networks By Alfred Hermida, BBC News Online 11 February 2002.