Lankenau Medical Center

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Lankenau Medical Center
Main Line Health
Geography
LocationWynnewood, Lower Merion, Pennsylvania, United States
Coordinates39°59′17″N 75°15′43″W / 39.988°N 75.262°W / 39.988; -75.262Coordinates: 39°59′17″N 75°15′43″W / 39.988°N 75.262°W / 39.988; -75.262
Organization
FundingNon-profit hospital
Hospital typeTeaching
Services
StandardsJoint Commission
Emergency departmentLevel II Trauma Center
Beds331
HelipadFAA LID: 9PA9
History
Founded1850
Links
Websitewww.mainlinehealth.org/lankenau
ListsHospitals in Pennsylvania

Lankenau Medical Center is a 331-bed tertiary care, teaching hospital and research institute in Wynnewood, Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania. An FAA-certified helipad is available for medevacs.[1]

It was chartered in 1860 as the "German Hospital of Philadelphia" and it opened in 1866 on Morris Street in North Philadelphia. With the entry of the United States into World War I in 1917, many German institutions took new names. The German Hospital renamed itself "Lankenau Hospital" after John D. Lankenau, a successful German-born Philadelphia businessman who had been one of the hospital's first leaders.[2]

The hospital moved to larger facilities at Girard and Corinthian Avenues in North Philadelphia in 1884. In December 1953, Lankenau moved to Wynnewood on the Main Line, occupying the site of the former Overbrook Country Club.[2]

In October 1984, the hospital joined with Bryn Mawr Hospital and the Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation Hospital under a nonprofit umbrella organization, Main Line Health.[3]

In 2010, Main Line began renovating its 331-bed hospital. As well, it added a 96-bed building, a parking garage, and a central utility plant. Because many double rooms were converted to singles, there was a net increase of 55 beds. The expanded facilities were renamed Lankenau Medical Center.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "FAA Information about Lankenau Hospital Heliport (9PA9)". www.airport-data.com. Retrieved 2018-02-28.
  2. ^ a b "The man behind Lankenau Hospital". Philadelphia Inquirer. August 30, 2013.
  3. ^ Ciccarelli, Maura C (December 19, 1985). "Meeting New Issues in Health Care". Philadelphia Inquirer. p. M.2.
  4. ^ Burling, Stacey (October 25, 2010). "Lankenau Hospital to start big expansion". Philadelphia Inquirer.

External links[edit]