Larry Boardman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Larry Boardman (born March 21, 1936, in Marlborough, Connecticut) is an American former lightweight boxer, rated the second best lightweight in the world in 1956.[1]

Biography[edit]

Board, who is Jewish, was managed by his father (Sam Boardman).[2][3][4] He lived in Connecticut for the majority of his life.[5]

Career[edit]

On February 7, 1956, at the age of 19, Boardman defeated lightweight champion Wallace "Bud" Smith at the Boston Garden, leading to him being rated # 10 in the world in the lightweight division by Ring.[2][6] It was Boardman's 31st victory in his first 32 pro fights.[6] On April 14, 1956, he beat featherweight champion and later Hall of Famer Sandy Saddler in a unanimous decision in 10 rounds, and moved up to # 7.[5][7][8][9]

Boardman also defeated two other lightweight world champions, Paddy DeMarco and Jimmy Carter.[10][11] At the end of 1956, he was ranked as the # 2 lightweight contender in the world.[5][11]

Boardman had a 45–10–1 record in his career, winning 23 of his fights by knockout.[5][12] In 2008, he was inducted into the Connecticut Boxing Hall of Fame.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Day by day in Jewish sports history. KTAV Publishing House, Inc. 2008. Retrieved February 2, 2011.
  2. ^ a b Friday's Heroes: Willie Pep Remembers. 2007. Retrieved February 2, 2011.
  3. ^ "Boardman Tackles Lightweight Boss", Sunday Herald, February 5, 1956, Retrieved February 2, 2011
  4. ^ "Conversation with ... Manny Leibert" Archived 2011-09-29 at the Wayback Machine, Jewish Ledger, November 17, 2006, Retrieved February 2, 2011
  5. ^ a b c d e "Vitali Klitschko Supports The WBC; Connecticut Boxing Hall of Fame News". Eastsideboxing.com. November 4, 2008. Retrieved February 2, 2011.
  6. ^ a b "Larry Boardman Upsets Lightweight Champ Smith", Lakeland Ledger, February 8, 1956, Retrieved February 2, 2011
  7. ^ Friday's Heroes: Willie Pep Remembers..., 2007, Retrieved February 2, 2011
  8. ^ "In this corner-- !": forty-two world champions tell their stories. Da Capo Press. 1994. Retrieved February 2, 2011.
  9. ^ The Boxing Register: International Boxing Hall of Fame Official Record Book. McBooks Press. 2006. Retrieved February 2, 2011.
  10. ^ "Boardman Adds Another Win", The Robesonian, November 13, 1956, Retrieved February 2, 2011
  11. ^ a b "Boardman Seeks Title", The Miami News, September 12, 1956, Retrieved February 2, 2011
  12. ^ "Larry Boardman – Boxer". Boxrec.com. Retrieved February 2, 2011.

External links[edit]