Larry Correia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Larry Correia
Correia at WorldCon
Correia at WorldCon
BornLarry Correia
1977[1]
El Nido, California, United States
OccupationAuthor
NationalityAmerican
Alma materUtah State University
Period2007–present
Genre
Notable works
Notable awards
Website
monsterhunternation.com

Larry Correia is an American fantasy and science fiction writer, known for his Monster Hunter, Grimnoir Chronicles, and Saga of the Forgotten Warriors series. He has authored or co-authored over 20 novels, has over 50 published short works, and has co-edited two published anthologies.

He was nominated for the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer in 2011, and his works have been nominated for the Audie Award multiple times, winning twice. He has won the Dragon Award for Best Military Science Fiction or Best Fantasy Novel four times. In 2014, Correia started the failed Sad Puppies campaign to nominate works for the Hugo Award, including his own, that he claimed were more popular but often unfairly passed over by voters in favor of more literary works or stories with progressive political themes.

Early life[edit]

Correia grew up in El Nido, California working on his Portuguese father's dairy farm until his mid-teens, when his family moved to Utah. He stayed in California for about a year before joining his family in Utah. While attending Utah State University, Correia—who was raised Catholic—joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served a two-year mission in Alabama.[2]

After returning home from his mission, he got married before graduating with an accounting degree. He worked as an accountant for several years before Correia opened a gun store with business partners while continuing to work as an accountant. He also started working as a firearms instructor and a CCW instructor.[3] In 2013, he began working as a writer full-time.[2]

Writing career[edit]

Correia's works often include magic and mythical monsters, such as vampires and werewolves. His stories are typically action-oriented with accurate and detailed depictions of firearms usage.[4] Correia used to be active on firearms discussion boards, where he would write about his interest in weapons and low-budget monster movies, and also get inspiration from various online threads. The original rough draft of Dead Six appeared on one of these forums, "The High Road", in a thread started by Mike Kupari called "Welcome Back, Mr. Nightcrawler".[5][6]

His self-published first novel, Monster Hunter International, was written for—and marketed directly to—the posters on these boards. One of these posters had once worked in a large independent bookstore, and passed it on to his old employer—who in turn passed it to Baen Books—which offered Correia a publishing contract.[7] Monster Hunter International, despite being self-published, reached the Entertainment Weekly bestseller list in April 2008, before he received this publishing contract. Monster Hunter International was re-released by Baen in July 2009 and was on the Locus bestseller list in November 2009.

The sequel, Monster Hunter Vendetta, was a New York Times bestseller when released in September 2010.[8] The third book in the series, Monster Hunter Alpha, was released in July 2011 and was also a New York Times bestseller.[9] Dead Six, the first book in a new trilogy co-authored with Mike Kupari, was released in September 2011. Correia was a finalist for the 2011 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer.[10] The fourth Monster Hunter International novel, Monster Hunter Legion, received 17 fewer nominations than the least-nominated finalist for the 2013 Hugo Award for Best Novel.[11][12][13][14]

Correia's The Grimnoir Chronicles trilogy, set in an alternate and magical 1930s, began with the release of Hard Magic in May 2011. The second book, Spellbound, was released in November that same year. The audiobook versions of Hard Magic and Spellbound won Audie Awards in 2012 and 2013 (respectively).[15][16][17][18] Warbound (August 2013), the final book in the trilogy, was a finalist for the Hugo Award for Best Novel as a result of the Sad Puppies campaign, and received an Audie Award in 2014.[19][20][21] The second Dead Six novel, Swords of Exodus, was released in September 2013. Correia wrote a number of short stories and a novel in 2013 and 2014 for Privateer Press that were set in the Iron Kingdoms role-playing world.

Monster Hunter Nemesis (July 2014), the fifth volume in the main Monster Hunter series, was chosen as a finalist for the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 2015, but Correia declined the nomination.[22][23] Correia began Saga of the Forgotten Warrior, a new epic fantasy series, with Son of the Black Sword (November 2015), which won an inaugural Dragon Award in the "Best Fantasy Novel" category in 2016.[24] It was also nominated for the David Gemmell Legend Award and placed 9th in the voting for the Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel in 2016.[25][26]

A spin-off series set in the Monster Hunter universe—co-written with John Ringo—was started in August 2016 with Monster Hunter Memoirs. It is set about 30 years before the main series and follows the exploits of Oliver Chadwick Gardenier. The final book in the Dead Six trilogy, Alliance of Shadows, as well as Monster Hunter Memoirs: Sinners were released in October and December (respectively) that year. Monster Hunter Siege was released in August 2017, while Monster Hunter Memoirs: Saints was released in July 2018. House of Assassins is projected for release in 2019.[27] Monster Hunter Guardian, co-authored with Sarah A. Hoyt, was released in August 2019, and Monster Hunter Bloodlines was released in August 2021.[28] The third book in the Saga of the Forgotten Warrior series, Destroyer of Worlds, was released in December 2020,[29] and the fourth and fifth books have been announced.[28]

Outside of writing, Correia has been a guest on "Shooting Gallery",[30] Joe Mantegna’s Gun Stories,[31] and Huckabee[32] talking about firearms. He and Steven Diamond also host a writing podcast called "Writers Dojo".[33]

Sad Puppies[edit]

Correia and science fiction author Brad R. Torgersen were leaders of the "Sad Puppies", a group of SF fans and authors who organized a voting campaign to nominate more works by conservative and libertarian authors, as well as classic "pulp" science fiction, for Hugo Awards. The Sad Puppies charged that these popular works were often unfairly passed over by Hugo voters in favor of more literary works, or stories with progressive political themes.[34][35] The campaign was ultimately unsuccessful and was discontinued in 2017.

Works[edit]

Correia is best known for his Monster Hunter International, Grimnoir Chronicles, and Saga of the Forgotten Warrior series. The Monster Hunter International series chronicles the fictional adventures of the employees of Monster Hunter International, a company that hunts vampires, werewolves, zombies, and other monsters in order to protect the general public from them. The existence of these monsters is suppressed by a secret governmental organization known as the Monster Control Bureau. As the MCB is too small to handle all the monster hunting, they place bounties on the various monsters, and companies like MHI receive those bounties after proving they have eliminated them. The main character is Owen Zastava Pitt, a former accountant whose boss turned into a werewolf and tried to kill him. After nearly dying while dispatching his boss, Owen is recruited into MHI.

The Grimnoir Chronicles is an alternate history fantasy series set in the 1930s. In the world of Grimnoir, magical abilities began manifesting in people in 1849. Most of those with magical abilities have very minor magic (about one in 100 people). About one in a thousand of those has major abilities and is known as an Active. The main character, Jake Sullivan, is a Heavy (he can manipulate gravity). He eventually joins the Grimnoir Society after finding the government is lying to him, working with them to stop the Imperium and the ambitions of Okubo Tokugawa.

In Saga of the Forgotten Warrior, Ashok is a Protector, warrior monks chosen to enforce the law and root out anyone who is practicing the old ways. He is very good at what he does, until he finds out he isn't who he thinks he is, and that he's been lied to his entire life. He has to choose whether to hide the lies or to rebel against what he thought was right.

Awards and recognition[edit]

Correia has been nominated for and won multiple awards over his career.

Year Organization Award title, Category Work Result Refs
2011 World Science Fiction Society John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer n/a Nominated [10]
2012 Audio Publishers Association Audie Award, Paranormal Hard Magic Won [15][16]
2013 Audio Publishers Association Audie Award, Paranormal Spellbound Won [17][18]
2014 Audio Publishers Association Audie Award, Paranormal Warbound Nominated [20][21]
2014 World Science Fiction Society Hugo Award, Best Novel Warbound Nominated [36][37]
2015 Audio Publishers Association Audie Award, Thriller/Suspense Dead Six Nominated [38]
2015 World Science Fiction Society Hugo Award, Best Novel Monster Hunter Nemesis Withdrawn [22]
2016 Audio Publishers Association Audie Award, Fantasy Son of the Black Sword Nominated [39]
2016 Dragon Con Dragon Award, Best Fantasy Novel Son of the Black Sword Won [24]
2016 David Gemmell Awards for Fantasy Legend Award Son of the Black Sword Nominated [25]
2016 Locus readers Locus Poll Award, Best Fantasy Novel Son of the Black Sword 9 [26]
2017 Dragon Con Dragon Award, Best Fantasy Novel Monster Hunter Memoirs: Grunge Won [40]
2019 Dragon Con Dragon Award, Best Fantasy Novel House of Assassins Won [41]
2021 Dragon Con Dragon Award, Best Military Science Fiction or Fantasy Novel Gun Runner Won [42]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Podcast". www.baen.com.
  2. ^ a b Correia, Larry (2013). "About me". Monster Hunter Nation. Retrieved June 14, 2014.
  3. ^ Correia, Larry (December 20, 2012). "An opinion on gun control". Monster Hunter Nation. Retrieved March 26, 2014.
  4. ^ "Larry Correia Biography". Fantasy Book Review. Archived from the original on February 13, 2015. Retrieved June 11, 2014.
  5. ^ Nightcrawler (June 26, 2006). "Welcome Back, Mr. Nightcrawler". Archived from the original on April 11, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2017.
  6. ^ "Reservist, best-selling author team up for action-thriller". USAF. 12 March 2012. Archived from the original on March 27, 2012.
  7. ^ Reed, Rob (October 27, 2015). "An interview with 'Monster Hunter' author Larry Correia". Examiner.com. Archived from the original on February 2, 2016. Retrieved April 11, 2017.
  8. ^ "Best Sellers: Paperback Mass-Market Fiction". The New York Times. October 17, 2010. Retrieved November 20, 2011.
  9. ^ "Best Sellers: Paperback Mass-Market Fiction". The New York Times. August 14, 2011. Retrieved November 20, 2011.
  10. ^ a b "2011 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  11. ^ "2013 Hugo Award". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  12. ^ Glyer, Mike (January 22, 2014). "Larry Correia's Vulgar Blog Post – His Word". File 770. Archived from the original on April 11, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  13. ^ Barnett, David (April 26, 2016). "The Hugo Awards: George RR Martin, Vox Day and Alastair Reynolds on the prize's future". The Guardian. Archived from the original on April 11, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  14. ^ "Sad Puppies". Activismnow.us. Archived from the original on April 11, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  15. ^ a b "2012 Audies". Audio Publishers Association. Retrieved September 6, 2016.
  16. ^ a b "2012 Audie Awards Winners". Locus. June 8, 2012. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  17. ^ a b "2013 Audies". Audio Publishers Association. Retrieved September 6, 2016.
  18. ^ a b "2013 Audie Awards Winners". Locus. May 31, 2013. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  19. ^ "2014 Hugo Awards". April 20, 2014. Retrieved June 11, 2014.
  20. ^ a b "2014 Audies". Audio Publishers Association. Retrieved September 6, 2016.
  21. ^ a b "2014 Audie Finalists Announced". Publishers Weekly. February 18, 2014. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  22. ^ a b "2015 Hugo Award". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  23. ^ Correia, Larry (April 4, 2015). "The Nominees Announced and Why I Refused My Nomination". Monster Hunter Nation. Archived from the original on April 11, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2017.
  24. ^ a b "2016 Dragon Award". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved September 6, 2016.
  25. ^ a b "Award Category: Legend Award (David Gemmell Awards for Fantasy)". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  26. ^ a b "2016 Locus Poll Award". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  27. ^ Correia, Larry (5 February 2019). House of Assassins (Saga of the Forgotten Warrior) Hardcover. ISBN 978-1481483766. February 5, 2019.
  28. ^ a b "March Update Post".
  29. ^ "Destroyer of Worlds by Larry Correia". Baen Books. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  30. ^ https://monsterhunternation.com/2018/02/27/im-on-tv-my-episode-of-shooting-gallery-airs-on-2-28-on-the-outdoor-channel/
  31. ^ https://monsterhunternation.com/2017/04/25/behind-the-scenes-of-me-filming-gun-stories/
  32. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzyuvl5Ry4g
  33. ^ https://anchor.fm/writerdojo
  34. ^ Anders, Charlie Jane. "The Hugo Awards were always political, but now they're only political". io9. Retrieved 31 July 2015.
  35. ^ Italie, Hillel (April 17, 2015). "Hugo Awards reflect sci-fi/fantasy divide". Associated Press. Retrieved 31 July 2015.
  36. ^ Werris, Wendy (May 30, 2014). "BEA 2014: Baen Beams at 30". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  37. ^ "2014 Hugo Award". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  38. ^ "2015 Audies". Audio Publishers Association. Retrieved September 6, 2016.
  39. ^ "2016 Audies". Audio Publishers Association. Retrieved September 6, 2016.
  40. ^ "2017 Dragon Award". Dragon Awards. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  41. ^ "2019 Dragon Award". Dragon Awards. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  42. ^ https://www.johndbrown.com/gun-runner-wins-dragon-award/

External links[edit]