Larry Thurston

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Larry "T" Thurston is a soul, R&B, and blues singer, best known for being the lead vocalist for Matt Murphy's band and the Blues Brothers.

Larry Thurston's musical career dates back to the early 1980s with St Louis's Soulard Bues Band. His next band was the Blues City Band, followed by The Sounds of The City, which also featured Johnnie Johnson, Chuck Berry's collaborator, and the great bassist, Gus Thornton. Eventually Thurston garnered a reputation outside St Louis, performing with James Cotton and Matt Murphy.

After John Belushi died from a heroin and cocaine overdose in 1982,[1] Blues Brothers guitarist Matt "Guitar" Murphy started his own band, with Larry Thurston as his lead singer. It was with Murphy's band where he proved to be a true performer. When the Blues Brothers reunited in 1988, Thurston was chosen to take Belushi's place as lead singer, alongside classic soul/R&B artists such as Sam Moore and Eddie Floyd. The band started going on world tours and in the process, created the albums The Blues Brothers Band Live in Montreux and Red, White & Blues. In 1994, Thurston left the Blues Brothers and was replaced by Tommy "Pipes" McDonnell.[2] He finished college, began working a regular job, and became an associate minister at his church.

Songwriter Jeff Alexander caught Larry performing with Johnnie Johnson at Off Broadway in St Louis. In 2001 Alexander began recording "School For Fools" and asked Larry to participate. Next, Levon Helm joined on drums, and piano great Johnnie Johnson sat in on two songs. Packed with moving performance by Thurston, School For Fools morphed into Larry’s first and only solo album, receiving critical acclaim in blues circles worldwide. In 2004 Alexander was producing Johnnie Be Eighty. And Still Bad! A Johnnie Johnson project. Johnson, still beyond compare on piano, was unable to sing his best, and Alexander tapped Larry for vocals on 5 of the tracks.[3][4]

Larry Thurston's musical career dates back to the early 1980s when he fronted St Louis' Soulard Blues Band. The Blues City Band and The Sounds Of The City, which also featured Chuck Berry's pianist and collaborator Johnnie Johnson, bassist Gus Thornton and Tom Maloney. Eventually Thurston garnered attention outside St. Louis, and performed with James Cotton and Matt Murphy's bands. After John Belushi died Matt Murphy asked Thurston to be the vocalist for his solo band. When The Blues Brothers reformed, Thurston was asked to join Eddie Floyd and Sam Moore as one of the frontmen. Thurston recorded with both the Blues Brothers and Matt Murphy.

After several years Thurston, returned to St Louis, finished college, got a job and became an associate minister, and latter became the pastor of the New Covenant Christian Church, which he founded. Songwriter Jeff Alexander caught Larry perform with Johnnie Johnson at Off Broadway in St Louis, and considered Thurston to be one of the finest vocalists he’d witnessed. In 2001 Alexander began recording School For Fools, and asked Larry to participate. Next, Levon Helm came on board as the drummer, and piano great Johnnie Johnson sat in on two songs. Packed with moving performance by Thurston, School For Fools morphed into Larry’s first and only solo album, receiving critical acclaim in blues circles worldwide. In 2004 Alexander was producing Johnnie Be Eighty. And Still Bad! A Johnnie Johnson project. Johnson, still beyond compare on piano, was unable to sing his best, and Alexander tapped Larry for vocals on 5 of the tracks.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About The Blues Brothers :: Blues Brothers Central". bluesbrotherscentral.com. 
  2. ^ "Tommy McDonnell & The Mac 5". Tommy McDonnell & The Mac 5. 
  3. ^ "Larry Thurston :: Blues Brothers Central". bluesbrotherscentral.com. 
  4. ^ "Larry Thurston Info&Reviews". cousinmoemusic.com.