Larteh language

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Larteh
Native to Ghana
Region Anum, Lete, Chiripon
Native speakers
74,000 (2003)[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3 lar
Glottolog lart1238[2]

Larteh is spoken 74,000 speakers in Ghana. The Lartehs and the closely related Kyiripons, are the main inhabitants of the mountainous parts of the Eastern region of Ghana. Of the Guans {the ethnic group which the Lartehs or the Kyiripons belong} they are the largest tribe and have the most successful language[citation needed] to capture the minds of Ghanaians.

Due to the language's ability to adapt to any accent of speaking, it seems to vary from town to town and it currently uses the Akuapem-Twi. The name Akuapem came to be because the Larteh hene was confronted with a war by the Asantes and thus sent a message throughout the larteh kingdom for every one to bring thousand soldiers to fight the Akans. This is what is termed in the Larteh language as "OKU AKPE" which was later retranslated into Twi as "AKU APEM" coming to stay as the name of the people. The language is also related to Efutu, Buem, Nkonya,Kete-Krachie, Nzema. The Lartehtowns extend from Larteh-Ahenease, Larteh Kubease, Larteh-Potruase, Mangoase and the Kyripon towns also extend from Tutu, Aperede, Aseseeso Akropong, Abiriw, Adukrom, Awukugua, Dawu, Abonsen Boso, and Anum.

Some dialects of Nchumuru languages spoken in Prang, Yeji, Dwan and Krachi in the Brong Ahafo region of Ghana are derived from the Larteh language.[3]

Their leader Gyedu Nkansa led the Guans from ancient Sudan through Timbuctu to the present location. As they migrate southward, part remained in present Northern Ghana,they are the Gonjas of Northern Ghana.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Larteh at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Larteh". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  3. ^ James, Anquandah; Benjamin, Kankpeyeng (2015-04-26). Current Perspectives in the Archaeology of Ghana. Sub-Saharan Publishers. p. 124. ISBN 978-9988-8602-3-3. 

Know Ghana Better.2015.Huniah Tetteh.Accra