Latin epsilon

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Fante translation of the Book of Mormon; note the use of the Latin epsilon in the word N'AHYƐMU.

Latin epsilon or open E (majuscule: Ɛ, minuscule: ɛ) is a letter of the extended Latin alphabet, based on the lowercase of the Greek letter epsilon (ε). It occurs in the orthographies of many Niger–Congo and Nilo-Saharan languages, such as Ewe, Akan, Lingala, Dinka and Maasai, for the vowel [ɛ] or [e̙], and is included in the African reference alphabet.

In the Berber Latin alphabet currently used in Algerian Berber school books,[1] and before that proposed by the French institute INALCO, it represents a voiced pharyngeal fricative [ʕ]. Some authors use ƹayin ⟨ƹ⟩ instead; both letters are similar in shape with the Arabic ʿayn ⟨ع⟩.

The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) uses various forms of the Latin epsilon:

The Uralic Phonetic Alphabet uses various forms of the Latin epsilon:[2]

  • U+1D08 LATIN SMALL LETTER TURNED OPEN E
  • U+1D4B MODIFIER LETTER SMALL OPEN E
  • U+1D4C MODIFIER LETTER SMALL TURNED OPEN E

Unicode[edit]

Latin epsilon is called "Open E" in Unicode.[3]

Character information
Preview Ɛ ɛ
Unicode name LATIN CAPITAL LETTER OPEN E LATIN SMALL LETTER OPEN E
Encodings decimal hex dec hex
Unicode 400 U+0190 603 U+025B
UTF-8 198 144 C6 90 201 155 C9 9B
Numeric character reference Ɛ Ɛ ɛ ɛ


It looks similar to the lowercase epsilon.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tamazight-Dzayer".
  2. ^ Everson, Michael; et al. (2002-03-20). "L2/02-141: Uralic Phonetic Alphabet characters for the UCS" (PDF).
  3. ^ Asmus Freytag; Rick McGowan; Ken Whistler (2006-05-08). "Unicode Technical Note #27: Known Anomalies in Unicode Character Names". The Unicode Consortium. Retrieved 2009-02-24. This is actually a Latin epsilon and should have been so called.