Latin epsilon

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Latin epsilon or open e (majuscule: Ɛ, minuscule: ɛ) is a letter of the extended Latin alphabet, based on the lowercase of the Greek letter epsilon (ε). It occurs in the orthographies of many Niger–Congo languages, such as Ewe, Akan, and Lingala, and is included in the African reference alphabet.

In the Berber Latin alphabet currently used in Algerian Berber school books,[1] and before that proposed by the French institute INALCO, it represents a voiced pharyngeal fricative [ʕ]. Some authors use ƹayin ⟨ƹ⟩ instead, both letters a similar in shape with the Arabic ʿayn ⟨ع⟩.

The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) uses various forms of the Latin epsilon:

The Uralic Phonetic Alphabet uses various forms of the Latin epsilon:[2]

  • U+1D08 LATIN SMALL LETTER TURNED OPEN E
  • U+1D4B MODIFIER LETTER SMALL OPEN E
  • U+1D4C MODIFIER LETTER SMALL TURNED OPEN E

Unicode[edit]

Latin epsilon is called "Open E" in Unicode.[3]

Character Ɛ ɛ
Unicode name LATIN CAPITAL LETTER OPEN E LATIN SMALL LETTER OPEN E
Encodings decimal hex decimal hex
Unicode 400 U+0190 603 U+025B
UTF-8 198 144 C6 90 201 155 C9 9B
Numeric character reference Ɛ Ɛ ɛ ɛ


It looks similar to the lowercase epsilon.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.freemorocco.com/tamazight-dzayer.html
  2. ^ Everson, Michael; et al. (2002-03-20). "L2/02-141: Uralic Phonetic Alphabet characters for the UCS" (PDF).
  3. ^ Asmus Freytag; Rick McGowan; Ken Whistler (2006-05-08). "Unicode Technical Note #27: Known Anomalies in Unicode Character Names". The Unicode Consortium. Retrieved 2009-02-24. This is actually a Latin epsilon and should have been so called.