Lattimer, Pennsylvania

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Lattimer, Pennsylvania
Census-designated place
The Lattimer Colliery, photographed circa 1890 by William H. Rau
The Lattimer Colliery, photographed circa 1890 by William H. Rau
Lattimer is located in Pennsylvania
Lattimer
Lattimer
Location within the state of Pennsylvania
Lattimer is located in the US
Lattimer
Lattimer
Lattimer (the US)
Coordinates: 40°59′38″N 75°57′40″W / 40.99389°N 75.96111°W / 40.99389; -75.96111Coordinates: 40°59′38″N 75°57′40″W / 40.99389°N 75.96111°W / 40.99389; -75.96111
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Luzerne
Township Hazle
Area
 • Total 0.2 sq mi (0.6 km2)
 • Land 0.2 sq mi (0.6 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Population (2010)
 • Total 554
 • Density 2,400/sq mi (920/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code 18202
Area code(s) 570

Lattimer is a village and census-designated place (CDP) in Hazle Township, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 554 at the 2010 census.[1]

History[edit]

The Lattimer massacre took place in the village on September 10, 1897; it resulted in the deaths of at least 19 unarmed striking immigrant anthracite coal miners.[2][3] The miners, mostly of Polish, Slovak, Lithuanian, and German ethnicity, were shot and killed by a Luzerne County sheriff's posse. Scores more were wounded.[4] The massacre was a turning point in the history of the United Mine Workers (UMW).

Geography[edit]

Lattimer is located at 40°59′38″N 75°57′40″W / 40.99389°N 75.96111°W / 40.99389; -75.96111.[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.23 square miles (0.6 km2), all of it land.[6] It is located directly northeast of the CDP of Harleigh and lies 1 mile (2 km) northeast of the city of Hazleton. Lattimer uses the Hazleton zip code of 18234.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Lattimer CDP, Pennsylvania". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved April 27, 2012. 
  2. ^ Anderson, John W. Transitions: From Eastern Europe to Anthracite Community to College Classroom. Bloomington, Ind.: iUniverse, 2005; ISBN 0-595-33732-5
  3. ^ Miller, Randall M. and Pencak, William. Pennsylvania: A History of the Commonwealth. State College, Penn.: Penn State Press, 2003; ISBN 0-271-02214-0
  4. ^ Estimates of the number of wounded are inexact. They range from a low of 17 wounded (Duwe, Grant. Mass Murder in the United States: A History. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 2007; ISBN 0-7864-3150-4) to as many as 49 injured (DeLeon, Clark. Pennsylvania Curiosities: Quirky Characters, Roadside Oddities & Other Offbeat Stuff. 3rd rev. ed. Guilford, Conn.: Globe Pequot, 2008; ISBN 0-7627-4588-6). Other estimates include 30 wounded (Lewis, Ronald L. Welsh Americans: A History of Assimilation in the Coalfields. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 2008; ISBN 0-8078-3220-0), 32 wounded (Anderson, Transitions: From Eastern Europe to Anthracite Community to College Classroom, 2005; Berger, Stefan; Croll, Andy; and Laporte, Norman. Towards A Comparative History of Coalfield Societies. Aldershot, Hampshire, UK: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2005; ISBN 0-7546-3777-8; Campion, Joan. Smokestacks and Black Diamonds: A History of Carbon County, Pennsylvania. Easton, Penn.: Canal History and Technology Press, 1997; ISBN 0-930973-19-4), 35 wounded (Foner, Philip S. First Facts of American Labor: A Comprehensive Collection of Labor Firsts in the United States. New York: Holmes & Meier, 1984; ISBN 0-8419-0742-0; Miller and Pencak, Pennsylvania: A History of the Commonwealth, 2003; Derks, Scott. Working Americans, 1880–2006: Volume VII: Social Movements. Amenia, NY: Grey House Publishing, 2006; ISBN 1-59237-101-9), 38 wounded (Weir, Robert E. and Hanlan, James P. Historical Encyclopedia of American Labor, Vol. 1. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Greenwood Press, 2004; ISBN 0-313-32863-3), 39 wounded (Long, Priscilla. Where the Sun Never Shines: A History of America's Bloody Coal Industry. Minneapolis: Paragon House, 1989; ISBN 1-55778-224-5; Novak, Michael. The Guns of Lattimer. Reprint ed. New York: Transaction Publishers, 1996; ISBN 1-56000-764-8), and 40 wounded (Beers, Paul B. The Pennsylvania Sampler: A Biography of the Keystone State and Its People. Mechanicsburg, Penn.: Stackpole Books, 1970).
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Lattimer CDP, Pennsylvania". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved April 27, 2012. 
  7. ^ imdb.com