Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies

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Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies
Latvijas Lauksaimniecības universitāte
Latvia University of Agriculture logo.png
Former names
Jelgava Academy of Agriculture (1936–1944),
Latvia Academy of Agriculture (1944–1990)
Latvia University of Agriculture (1990–2018)
MottoProventus pro patria
Motto in English
For the Growth of the Fatherland[1]
TypePublic
Established1938
RectorIrina Pilvere
Administrative staff
354
Students4778 (2013)
186 (2013)
Location,
Colours             Yellow, white and brown
Websitehttp://www.llu.lv

The Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies (until March 6, 2018 – Latvia University of Agriculture (LLU); Latvian: Latvijas Lauksaimniecības universitāte; LLU)[2] is a university in Jelgava, Latvia, specializing in agricultural science, forestry, food technology and related areas.

History[edit]

The university originated as the Agricultural Department at the Riga Polytechnical Institute in 1863, which in 1919 became the Faculty of Agriculture at the University of Latvia.[3] It became an independent institution in 1939,[3] when it was established as the Academy of Agriculture in the Jelgava Palace, which had been renovated for that purpose.[4] It was renamed to the Latvia University of Agriculture in 1990[3] and Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies on March 6, 2018.[2]

Organisation[edit]

Jelgava Palace, the administrative centre of the university

The university consists of 8 faculties offering the following study programmes:[5]

  • Faculty of Economics and Social Development (2013)
  • Economics
  • Business Studies
  • Entrepreneurship and Business Management
  • Business Management
  • Financial Management
  • Faculty of Information Technologies (2001)
  • Computer Control and Computer Science
  • Programming
  • Information Technologies
  • Faculty of Agriculture (1863)
  • Agriculture
  • Agricultural Entrepreneurship
  • Agronomist with Specialization in Zootechnics
  • Field Crops
  • Horticulture
  • Faculty of Environment and Civil Engineering (1947)
  • Civil Engineering and Construction
  • Land Surveying and Management
  • Environmental Science
  • Landscape Architecture
  • Landscape Architecture and Planning
  • Water Management
  • Environement and Water Management
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Forest Faculty (1920)
  • Forestry Science
  • Forest Ecology and Silviculture
  • Forest Works and Machinery
  • Forest Economics and Policy
  • Wood Materials and Technology
  • Forestry
  • Wood Processing Technology
  • Wood Processing
  • Labour Safety
  • Forest Engineering
  • Food Science
  • Nutrition Science
  • Catering and Hotel Management
  • Food Technology
  • Faculty of Engineering (1944)
  • Agricultural Engineering
  • Technical Expert
  • Agricultural Power Engineering
  • Machine Design and Manufacturing
  • Home Environment in Education
  • Teacher of Vocational Education
  • Pedagogy
  • Career Counsellor
  • Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (1919)
  • Veterinary Medicine
  • Food Hygiene

Rectors[edit]

  • Pāvils Kvelde (lv) (1939–1940, 1941–1944)
  • Pauls Galenieks (lv) (1940–1941)
  • Jānis Ostrovs (1941)
  • Maksis Eglītis (lv) (1944)
  • Jānis Peive (1944–1950)
  • Amālija Cekuliņa (1950–1954)
  • Jānis Vanags (lv) (1954–1961)
  • Pāvils Zariņš (1961–1966)
  • Olģerts Ozols (1966–1976)
  • Kazimirs Špoģis (lv) (1976–1980)
  • Viktors Timofejevs (1980–1986)
  • Imants Gronskis (1986–1992)
  • Voldemārs Strīķis (lv) (1992–2002)
  • Pēteris Bušmanis (2002–2004)
  • Juris Skujāns (2004–2014)
  • Irina Pilvere (2014–present)

Notable alumni[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zane Plone (September 12, 2013). "Stamp dedicated to 150th anniversary of Latvia University of Agriculture to be presented in ceremony". Latvijas Pasts. Retrieved 2016-05-07.
  2. ^ a b "Latvia University of Agriculture changes its name to Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies". Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies. May 6, 2018. Retrieved 2018-03-07.
  3. ^ a b c United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (2002). Latvia: Towards a Knowledge-Based Economy. United Nations. p. 23. ISBN 92-1-116822-8.
  4. ^ "The Jelgava palace throughout the centuries". Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies. Retrieved 2011-03-09.
  5. ^ Latvian University of Life Sciences and Technologies: Structure

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 56°40′01″N 23°45′37″E / 56.66694°N 23.76028°E / 56.66694; 23.76028