Latvian parliamentary election, 2002

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Parliamentary elections were held in Latvia on 5 October 2002.[1] The New Era Party emerged as the largest party in the Saeima, winning 26 of the 100 seats.

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
New Era Party 237,452 24.0 26 New
For Human Rights in United Latvia 189,088 19.1 25 +9
People's Party 165,246 16.7 20 –4
Latvia's First Party 94,752 9.6 10 New
Union of Greens and Farmers 93,759 9.5 12 +12
For Fatherland and Freedom/LNNK 53,396 5.4 7 –10
Latvian Way 48,430 4.9 0 –21
Latvian Social Democratic Workers' Party 39,837 4.0 0 –14
Light of Latgale 15,948 1.6 0 New
Social Democratic Union 15,162 1.5 0 New
Social Democratic Welfare Party 13,234 1.3 0 New
Political Alliance "Centre" [a] 5,819 0.6 0 New
Russian Party 4,724 0.5 0 New
Latvians' Party 3,919 0.4 0 New
Latvian Revival Party 2,558 0.3 0 New
Freedom Party 2,075 0.2 0 New
Mara's Land 1,446 0.1 0 New
Citizens' Union "Our Land" 1,349 0.1 0 0
Progressive Centre Party 1,229 0.1 0 New
Latvian United Republican Party 826 0.1 0 New
Invalid/blank votes 7,505
Total 997,754 100 100 0
Registered voters/turnout 1,295,287 77.0
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

a Political Alliance "Centre" was an alliance of Latvia's Democratic Party, the Workers' Party, For Freedom in Latvia and the Union of Latvian Farmers.[2]

Aftermath[edit]

Voters severely punished the previous governing parties, with the People's Party and For Fatherland and Freedom both losing seats, while Latvian Way lost all its MPs.

A new coalition government was formed by the New Era Party, Latvia's First Party, For Fatherland and Freedom and the Union of Greens and Farmers. This enjoyed a parliamentary majority of 55 of the 100 MPs. However, after two years For Fatherland and Freedom left the coalition and was replaced by the People's Party, who returned to government after a two-year absence.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1122 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p1135