Laura Granville

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Laura Granville
Laura-Granville-2009Usopen.png
Granville at the 2009 US Open
Country (sports) United States
ResidenceChicago, Illinois, USA
Born (1981-05-12) May 12, 1981 (age 37)
Chicago, Illinois, USA
Height1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Turned pro2001
Retired2010
PlaysRight (two-handed backhand)
Prize moneyUS$1,327,584
Singles
Career record249–177
Career titles0 WTA, 9 ITF
Highest ranking28 (June 9, 2003)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open3R (2004, 2006)
French Open3R (2003)
Wimbledon4R (2002, 2007)
US Open3R (2005)
Doubles
Career record121–98
Career titles2 WTA, 6 ITF
Highest ranking47 (July 23, 2007)

Laura Granville (born May 12, 1981 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former American professional tennis player. During the two years she spent at Stanford University, she set the record for most consecutive singles victories with 58 and finished with an overall record of 93-3.[1] Granville won the NCAA singles championship as well as the ITA Player of the Year in both 2000 and 2001.[2]

In 2001, Stanford won the women's tennis national team championship, and Granville was also a doubles finalist. She retired in 2010 after seven full years on the WTA Tour and returned to Stanford, where she completed her studies and graduated in 2012. She was inducted into the Stanford University Athletics Hall of Fame in 2014.

Granville is now in her sixth season as the head coach of the Princeton University women's tennis team. In 2014, the Princeton women's tennis program won the Ivy League title and defeated Arizona State 4-3 to win its first-ever NCAA tournament match.[3]

Career highlights[edit]

1996- Won the Illinois girl's high school tennis state singles championships as a sophomore at The Latin School of Chicago.

1998- Claimed the United States Tennis Association national girls' 18 singles and earned a wildcard into the US Open main draw, losing in the second round (defeating World No. 96 Paola Suárez en route.)

1999- Repeated as the United States Tennis Association national girls' 18 singles and earned a wildcard into the US Open main draw.

2000- Won the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) women's tennis singles championships as a freshman at Stanford University.

2001- Won her second consecutive NCAA women's tennis singles championships as a sophomore at Stanford University. Turned professional after her sophomore year and reached three ITF circuit semifinals.

2002- Won two ITF tournaments, was the runner-up in two ITF tournaments, reached her first-ever WTA tour quarterfinals in New Haven, Connecticut, U.S. and Luxembourg (beating Arantxa Sánchez Vicario in the first round), won three singles matches at Wimbledon (including a defeat of Mary Pierce), reached the third round at the tournament in Montreal, and made her Top 100 and Top 50 debuts.

2007- Defeated former World No. 1 Martina Hingis in the third round at Wimbledon to match her career best showing there. Defeated 2013 Wimbledon Champion Marion Bartoli indoors at Memphis.

2008- Won the Midland, Michigan, U.S. ITF tournament.

WTA career finals[edit]

Singles: 1 (0-1)[edit]

Winner — Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
WTA Tour Championships (0–0)
Tier I / Premier Mandatory & Premier 5 (0–0)
Tier II / Premier (0–0)
Tier III, IV & V / International (0–1)
Result No. Date Tournament Surface Opponents Score
Loss 1. 15 August 2004 Vancouver Hard Czech Republic Nicole Vaidišová 6–2, 4–6, 2–6

Doubles: 5 (2-3)[edit]

Winner — Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
WTA Tour Championships (0–0)
Tier I / Premier Mandatory & Premier 5 (0–0)
Tier II / Premier (0–0)
Tier III, IV & V / International (2–3)
Result No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Loss 1. 19 May 2003 Strasbourg Clay Croatia Jelena Kostanić Tošić Canada Sonya Jeyaseelan
Croatia Maja Matevžič
4–6, 4–6
Loss 2. 19 February 2005 Memphis Hard United States Abigail Spears Japan Yuka Yoshida
Japan Miho Saeki
3–6, 4–6
Win 1. 24 July 2005 Cincinnati Hard United States Abigail Spears Czech Republic Květa Peschke
Argentina María Emilia Salerni
3–6, 6–2, 6–4
Win 2. 5 November 2006 Quebec City Carpet (i) United States Carly Gullickson United States Jill Craybas
Russia Alina Jidkova
6–3, 6–4
Loss 3. 4 January 2010 Auckland Hard South Africa Natalie Grandin Zimbabwe Cara Black
United States Liezel Huber
6–7(4–7), 2–6

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-19. Retrieved 2006-04-17.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ [2]

External links[edit]