Laura Spinney

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Laura Spinney
Born1971 (age 48–49)
Alma materDurham University (BSc)
Scientific career
FieldsSpanish flu[1]
Pandemics
InstitutionsMax Planck Institute for the History of Science
Websitewww.lauraspinney.com

Laura Spinney (born August 1971) is a British science journalist, novelist, and non-fiction writer whose 2017 book Pale Rider is an account of the 1918 influenza pandemic.[2]

Education[edit]

Spinney graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Sciences from Durham University in 1993.[3][4]

Career[edit]

Spinney has written for Nature,[5][6][7][8] National Geographic, The Economist, New Scientist, and The Guardian.[9] She is the author of two novels, The Doctor [10] and The Quick,[11] and a collection of oral history from a central European city entitled Rue Centrale.[12] In 2017 she published Pale Rider,[1] an account of the 1918 flu pandemic,[13][14] published by Jonathan Cape who acquired the global rights in an auction in 2015.[15]

Spinney's most recent book-length work is an english translation of Swiss writer Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz's novel Derborence.[16][17] In 2019 she spent two months as a journalist-in-residence at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, Germany.[18]

Books[edit]

Spinney's published books and novels include:

  • The Doctor[10]
  • The Quick[11]
  • Rue Centrale[12]
  • Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How it Changed the World[1][4]
  • Derborence: Where the devils came down[16]

Articles[edit]

Spinney's published articles include:

  • "Biotechnology: "Biotechnology in Crops: Issues for the Developing World" by Laura Spinney for Oxfam GB". San Francisco State University. 13 January 1998. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  • H.M. The Economist, 2008.
  • "Disease naming must change to avoid scapegoating and politics". Aeon Essays. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  • How Facebook, fake news and friends are warping your memory[5]
  • "Did Human Sacrifice Help People Form Complex Societies?". The Atlantic. 27 February 2018. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  • "Unearthed: Why we've got monuments like Stonehenge all wrong". New Scientist. 8 January 2018. Retrieved 21 October 2018.

Personal life[edit]

Spinney lives in Paris, France.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How it Changed the World. Jonathan Cape, 2017. ISBN 9781910702376
  2. ^ DeGroot, Gerard (20 May 2017). "Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How it Changed the World by Laura Spinney". thetimes.co.uk. Retrieved 21 October 2018. (subscription required)
  3. ^ "Books and Authors". Durham First (15): 31. Spring 2002.
  4. ^ a b Rego Barry, Rebecca (13 November 2018). "Exhuming the Flu". Distillations. Science History Institute. 4 (3): 40–43. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  5. ^ a b Spinney, Laura (2017). "How Facebook, fake news and friends are warping your memory". Nature. 543 (7644): 168–170. doi:10.1038/543168a.
  6. ^ Spinney, Laura (2019). "How pandemics shape social evolution". Nature. 574 (7778): 324–326. doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03048-8. ISSN 0028-0836.
  7. ^ Spinney, Laura (2020). "Panicking about societal collapse? Plunder the bookshelves". Nature. 578 (7795): 355–357. doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00436-3. ISSN 0028-0836.
  8. ^ Spinney, Laura (2012). "Q&A: Maestro of the swarm". Nature. 481 (7380): 144–144. doi:10.1038/481144a. ISSN 0028-0836.
  9. ^ Spinney, Laura (25 March 2020). "It takes a whole world to create a new virus, not just China | Laura Spinney" – via www.theguardian.com.
  10. ^ a b The Doctor. Methuen, London, 2001. ISBN 0413754707
  11. ^ a b The Quick. Fourth Estate, London, 2007. ISBN 9780007240500
  12. ^ a b Rue Centrale. Editions L’Age d’Homme, 2013. ISBN 9782825143216
  13. ^ Seymour, Miranda (4 June 2017). "Pale Rider review – painful lessons of the flu pandemic". the Guardian. Archived from the original on 13 October 2018. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  14. ^ "The deadliest disease in history". economist.com. 25 May 2017. Archived from the original on 23 June 2018. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  15. ^ Farrington, Joshua (17 June 2015). "Cape wins auction for Spanish Flu study". thebookseller.com. The Bookseller. Archived from the original on 23 June 2018. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  16. ^ a b Derborence: Where the devils came down. Skomlin, 2018. ISBN 9781789265811
  17. ^ "Derborence – Where the devils came down". Skomlin. 2 October 2018. Archived from the original on 13 October 2018. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  18. ^ "Journalists-in-Residence". mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de. Archived from the original on 13 October 2018. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  19. ^ Spinney, Laura (5 December 2013). "About Laura Spinney". Archived from the original on 28 January 2018. Retrieved 21 October 2018.