Laurel Hubbard

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Laurel Hubbard
Personal information
Nationality New Zealand
Born 1978 (age 39–40)
Years active 1998–present
Sport
Country New Zealand
Sport Weightlifting

Laurel Hubbard (born 1978), formerly known as Gavin Hubbard, is a retired New Zealand transgender weightlifter.[1]

Career[edit]

Hubbard is the child of Dick Hubbard, a former Mayor of Auckland City[2] and the founder of Hubbard Foods.[citation needed]

Competing as Gavin Hubbard before her gender transition, Hubbard set New Zealand junior records in 1998 in the newly established M105+ division with snatch 135 kg, clean & jerk 170 kg, total 300 kg.[3] Those records were later surpassed by David Liti.[4]

In 2012 Hubbard was appointed to the position of Executive Officer for Olympic Weightlifting New Zealand.[citation needed] Subsequently she transitioned to female and became Laurel Hubbard.[5]

At the 2017 Australian International & Australian Open in Melbourne, she competed at the heaviest 90 kg+ category, winning the gold medal with a 123 kg snatch and 145 kg clean & jerk, for a total of 268 kg at a bodyweight of 131.83 kg.[6][7] She thus became the first trans woman to win an international weightlifting title for New Zealand.[5][8] Although Hubbard met eligibility requirements to compete, her win sparked controversy, with some other competitors claiming the competition was unfair.[2][8][9] Athletes that were critical of the decision to allow Hubbard to compete include Iuniarra Sipaia,[9] Toafitu Perive,[9] Deborah Acason[8] and Tracey Lambrechs.[8] Australian Weightlifting Federation's chief executive, Michael Keelan, said it was unfair to other competitors,[7] comedian Pat Condell declared that any win would be worthless.[10][11]

Hubbard qualified for the 2018 Commonwealth Games,[12] but an elbow injury during the competition forced her withdrawal from the event[13] while leading the field.[14]

Major results[edit]

Year Venue Weight Snatch (kg) Clean & Jerk (kg) Total Rank
1 2 3 Rank 1 2 3 Rank
Commonwealth Games
2018 Australia Gold Coast, Australia[15] +90 kg 120 127 132 1 --- --- --- --- --- DNF
World Championships
2017 United States Anaheim, United States[16] +90 kg 120 124 127 2nd, silver medalist(s) 144 147 151 4 275 2nd, silver medalist(s)
Oceania Championships
2017 Australia Gold Coast, Australia[16] +90 kg 120 127 133 1 140 146 152 1 273 1st, gold medalist(s)
Commonwealth Championships
2017 Australia Gold Coast, Australia[16] +90 kg 120 127 133 1 140 146 152 1 273 1st, gold medalist(s)
World Masters Games
2017 New Zealand Auckland, New Zealand[17] +90 kg 120 127 131 1 135 143 149 1 280 1st, gold medalist(s)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Commonwealth Games: Transgender weightlifter Laurel Hubbard set to compete". BBC Sport. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  2. ^ a b "'She has every right to compete with women': Transgender weightlifter sparks criticism after competition win". Yahoo News Australia. 20 March 2017. Retrieved 25 March 2017.
  3. ^ "New Zealand Interschool's Weightlifting Championship 2014 – Round 6" (PDF). Sporty.co.nz. Retrieved 24 March 2017.
  4. ^ "National Records – Olympic Weightlifting New Zealand". Retrieved 4 December 2017.
  5. ^ a b "Weightlifting: Transgender lifter Laurel Hubbard wins first international outing". The New Zealand Herald. 19 March 2017. Retrieved 25 March 2017.
  6. ^ "2017 Australian International & Australian Open" (PDF). Awf.com.au. Retrieved 24 March 2017.
  7. ^ a b Windley, Matt (19 March 2017). "Laurel Hubbard wins female 90kg+ division at weightlifting's Australian International". Herald Sun. Retrieved 25 March 2017.
  8. ^ a b c d Payne, Marissa (22 March 2017). "Transgender woman wins international weightlifting title amid controversy over fairness". The Washington Post. Retrieved 25 March 2017.
  9. ^ a b c "Woman lifter beaten by transgender speaks up". Samoaobserver.ws. Retrieved 24 November 2017.
  10. ^ "Transgender Weightlifter Claims to Have No Advantage Over Biologically Female Athletes". 11 December 2017.
  11. ^ "Trans weightlifter Laurel Hubbard wins silver at World Championship".
  12. ^ "Laurel Hubbard - New Zealand Olympic Team". 24 November 2017.
  13. ^ Tunnicliffe, Bridget (9 April 2018). "Hubbard has no regrets, stays 'true to sport'". Radio New Zealand.
  14. ^ Helen Davidson (1970-01-01). "Transgender weightlifter Laurel Hubbard's eligibility under scrutiny | Sport". The Guardian. Retrieved 2018-04-09.
  15. ^ "Commonwealth Games Results Book" (PDF). Gold Coast 2018 Official Website. GOLDOC. Retrieved 13 April 2018.
  16. ^ a b c "HUBBARD Laurel NZL". Athletes search results. IWF – International Weightlifting Federation. Retrieved 11 December 2017.
  17. ^ "2017 World Masters Games" (PDF). IWF – Masters Weightlifting. Retrieved 1 January 2018.