Lauren Newton

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Lauren Newton
Lauren Newton 2015 (Annamarie Ursula) P1180751.jpg
Lauren Newton performs at the Loft in Cologne, Germany, in 2015.
Background information
Birth name Lauren Amber Newton
Born (1952-11-16) November 16, 1952 (age 65)
Coos Bay, Oregon, U.S.
Genres Avant-garde jazz, contemporary classical
Occupation(s) Singer
Years active 1977–present
Labels Leo
Associated acts Vienna Art Orchestra, Vocal Summit
Website laurennewton.com

Lauren Amber Newton (born 16 November 1952) is an avant-garde jazz and contemporary classical singer who and founding member of the Vienna Art Orchestra.

Biography[edit]

Newton earned a degree in music at the University of Oregon. In 1974 she moved to Europe and continued her music studies[1] with Sylvia Geszty (de) at the State University of Music and Performing Arts Stuttgart. In 1977 she joined the Vienna Art Orchestra, touring widely with the group until 1989. With Bobby McFerrin, Jeanne Lee, Urszula Dudziak and Jay Clayton she formed the Vocal Summit in 1982.

Newton combines conventional technique with unconventional vocal sounds.[1] She has taught at the Berlin University of the Arts, University of Music and Performing Arts, Graz in Austria, Folkwang Hochschule in Essen, Germany, and Musikhochschule Luzern in Lucerne, Switzerland.

Lauren Newton in Germany, 2015
(Photo by Annamarie Ursula)

Her debut album, Timbre (1983), won a German Critics Award. During the next six years she collaborated with Austrian poet Ernst Jandl. She has also worked with Jon Rose, Fritz Hauser, Vladimir Tarasov[1], Anthony Braxton, Christy Doran, Bernd Konrad, Peter Kowald, Joachim Kühn, Joëlle Léandre, Urs Leimgruber, Patrick Scheyder, Aki Takase, and the Südpool-Ensemble directed by Herbert Joos.

She performed Adriana Hölszky's Comment for Lauren and other works by Hans-Joachim Hespos, Bernd Konrad, Hannes Zerbe, and Wolfgang Dauner. In 1993 she performed Henning Schmiedt's adaptation for solo vocalist of Mahler's Kindertotenlieder. In 1998 she participated in the international conference Frau Musica (nova) at the conservatory in Cologne, Germany.

Discography[edit]

As leader[edit]

  • Timbre (Leo, 1983)
  • Voiceprint (Extraplatte, 1988)
  • Art Is... (Leo, 1995)
  • Composition 192 with Anthony Braxton (Leo, 1996)
  • 18 Colors (Leo, 1996)
  • Altered Egos (Omba, 1998)
  • Filigree (Hatology, 1998)
  • The Lightness of Hearing (Leo, 2002)
  • Out of Sound (Leo, 2002)
  • Timbre Plus (Arbe, 2003)
  • Artesian Spirits (Leo, 2005)
  • Face It (Leo, 2005)
  • Spring in Bangkok (Intakt, 2006)
  • 2 Souls in Seoul (Leo, 2008)
  • Strings Moon (CD Baby, 2012)[2]

As member of Vienna Art Orchestra

As guest[edit]

With Jon Rose

  • 1994 Violin Music for Supermarkets
  • 1995 Eine Violine fur Valentin
  • 1997 Shopping.Live@Victo
  • 1998 Techno Mit Storungen[3]

With the Vienna Art Choir

  • From No Art to Mo(z)art (Moers, 1983)
  • Five Old Songs (Moers, 1984)
  • Swiss Swing (Moers, 1986)

With the Vienna Art Special

  • Serapionsmusic (Moers, 1984)

With others

  • 1996 Trio LTD, Trio LTD
  • 1996 Wait Until Dark, Secret Passion Orchestra
  • 2000 Not Missing Drums Project, Urban Voices
  • 2004 Grunt, Chotjewitz: The Magic of a Flute, George Gruntz
  • 2014 Dream a Little Dream, Pink Martini[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Kelsey, Chris. "Lauren Newton". AllMusic. Retrieved 24 May 2018. 
  2. ^ "Lauren Newton". AllMusic. Retrieved 24 May 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c "Lauren Newton | Credits | AllMusic". AllMusic. Retrieved 24 May 2018. 

External links[edit]