Lauren Southern

Page semi-protected
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lauren Southern
Lauren Southern (2016).jpg
Southern in 2016
Born
Lauren Cherie Southern

(1995-06-16) 16 June 1995 (age 27)
Alma mater
OccupationPolitical activist[1]
Political partyLibertarian
Children1[2]
YouTube information
Channel
Years active2015–present
Subscribers680,000[3]
Total views50 million[3]
YouTube Silver Play Button 2.svg 100,000 subscribers 2016

Last updated: June 2020
Websitelaurensouthern.net

Lauren Cherie Southern (born 16 June[4] 1995) is a Canadian alt-right[a] YouTuber, political activist and commentator. In 2015, Southern ran as a Libertarian Party candidate in the Canadian federal election.[5] Southern worked for Rebel Media until March 2017, when she began to work independently.[2]

In May 2017, Southern supported Defend Europe in their efforts to obstruct search-and-rescue operations of refugees from North Africa in the Mediterranean Sea.[6] Southern was briefly detained by the Italian Coast Guard for blocking a ship embarking on a search-and-rescue mission.[6] Consequently, crowdfunding website Patreon removed her from the platform, accusing her of engaging in activity "likely to cause loss of life".[7] She was also demonetized by YouTube and banned from GoFundMe.[8][9]

Some academics and journalists have described Southern as a white nationalist for her promotion of the Great Replacement and white genocide conspiracy theories,[b] though she has denied being a white nationalist.[2][10] Southern promoted the Great Replacement conspiracy theory via her YouTube video of the same name, released in July 2017;[11][12][13] the video was reported to have helped to promote the white nationalist viewpoint, having garnered over 600,000 views by March 2019.[11][14] She has been described as an advocate of the white genocide conspiracy theory for her documentary Farmlands (2018), in which she suggested the imminence of a race war in South Africa in response to supposedly racially motivated South African farm attacks.[15][16][17][18]

In July 2018, she visited Australia for a speaking tour with Stefan Molyneux; that August, the pair were banned from speaking in New Zealand.[19] Southern announced her retirement from political activism on 2 June 2019, but returned to YouTube on 19 June 2020.[2][20][21] As of 2021, she is a contributor for Sky News Australia.[10] She has rejected the "far-right" label and said she is not a racist,[22] preferring to be described as a conservative.[23] In 2019, when making such denials to a journalist from The Times of London, Southern ended their "conversation by predicting a race war."[22]

Early life

Southern was born in Surrey, British Columbia.[24] She studied political science at the University of the Fraser Valley,[5][25] but left after two years.[26]

On 18 October 2015, Southern was a candidate in the 2015 Canadian federal election representing the Libertarian Party in the district of Langley–Aldergrove.[5] She was briefly removed by the party as a candidate but was reinstated with support from Breitbart News and The Rebel Media.[6] The election was won by Conservative candidate Mark Warawa. Southern finished last, receiving 535 votes, or 0.9% of the total.[27]

Activism and views

Southern has been widely described as alt-right,[a] far-right[c] and right-wing.[d] Some academics and journalists have described Southern as a white nationalist,[b] which she has denied.[2][10] Southern also rejects the label "far-right", preferring to be described as a conservative.[23] The Southern Poverty Law Center has characterized Southern's videos as "anti-feminist, xenophobic, Islamophobic diatribes" which "tiptoe at the precipice of outright white nationalism".[28] She was interviewed by the London Times in 2019: "When we speak, Southern flatly denies being racist or even far right, then ends our conversation by predicting a race war and quoting Enoch Powell."[22]

Media work

Before she left university, The Rebel Media founder Ezra Levant met Southern at a conference. He had been impressed by the questions she had asked the speakers and asked her to audition. She moved to Toronto to work in the website's offices.[2][26] Her first video, "Why I Am Not A Feminist", appeared on the website in April 2015.[28] She worked regularly with Milo Yiannopoulos and Faith Goldy while at Rebel Media and made multiple videos with both of them.[26][29]

In October 2016, Southern had some documentation of her gender legally changed to male as part of a video produced for The Rebel Media to show the ease of Ontario's new gender ID laws.[30]

In December 2016, Southern self-published a short book Barbarians: How Baby Boomers, Immigrants, and Islam Screwed My Generation.[29][31] In the book, she wrote: "As far as I'm concerned, Hitler was just a SJW who happened to get freaky amounts of power and actually implement his #KillAllJews (the predecessor to #KillAllMen) worldview". According to her, Hitler "fawned over Muslims more sycophantically than Justin Trudeau."[29] Barbarians gained a cover endorsement from Ann Coulter.[28]

In March 2017, Southern announced she would be leaving The Rebel Media.[32] In the same month, she gained access to White House press briefings.[33][34] She has appeared on Lana Lokteff's program Radio 3Fourteen.[35]

Race and multiculturalism

Southern is against multiculturalism.[36] She has called the Black Lives Matter movement a "terrorist organisation", and a "divisive, violent movement that has fascistic tendencies", which she has falsely claimed has caused more deaths in 30 years than the Ku Klux Klan.[37]

She has asked whether a multicultural society would require witch doctors at medical conferences,[38] and has claimed that "multiculturalism will inevitably fail unless 50 per cent of the population believes in Western culture".[39] New Matilda reported that the core theme of her 2018 speaking tour of Australia was the claim "multiculturalism doesn't work".[40] On the tour, she caused controversy for publicly criticizing an "Asian only" room-share advert that she had photographed and called it "extremely tribalistic".[41] This was an attempt to highlight the supposed failure of multiculturalism, by suggesting that it produced a form of segregation.[41]

Influenced by the French political writer Renaud Camus, Southern is known for her promotion of the Great Replacement conspiracy theory, which posits that non-white immigration of Muslims will lead to a genocide of white Europeans.[44] She released a YouTube video under this title in July 2017,[11] which was credited with helping to promote a white nationalist viewpoint.[11] By August 2020, the video could only be accessed privately on Southern's home channel.[12] She has described the theory as: "You have one people and in the space of one generation you have a different people".[29]

Southern has defended the American neo-Nazi Richard B. Spencer, who has advocated for violence against non-whites on multiple occasions. Southern has said "Richard Spencer is not a white supremacist, he is a white nationalist. He believes in a white ethnostate, he doesn't believe in whites being superior."[6][28][45][46] Spencer has praised Southern's videos.[2]

Southern has been described as a proponent of the white genocide conspiracy theory.[15][16][17][47] In 2018, Southern produced a documentary called Farmlands which falsely claimed that racially motivated farm attacks in South Africa may represent an impending genocide, a common talking point for white nationalists.[48][49][50][51] While producing the documentary, Southern worked with Charlottesville Unite the Right rally attendee Simon Roche,[52] a spokesperson for the ethnonationalist (Völkisch) Afrikaner organization Suidlanders,[53] an organization which predicts a race war.[54]

Opposition to NGOs, refugees, and migration

In May 2017, Southern, along with Martin Sellner and Brittany Pettibone,[55] took part in an attempt organized by the Identitarian group Génération identitaire to block the passage of an NGO ship, the Aquarius (co-owned by SOS Mediterranée and by Doctors without Borders), which was leaving Sicily for a search-and-rescue mission for ship-wrecked refugees and migrants off the shores of Northern Africa in the Mediterranean Sea.[56][6] Claiming that the goal of the activists "was to stop an empty boat from going down to Libya and filling up with illegal migrants", Southern was briefly detained by the Italian Coast Guard. NGO ships often rescue migrants and refugees, who disembark from Libyan shores on unsafe makeshift rafts, and bring them to Sicily.[6][57] Regarding her actions, Southern stated: "if the politicians won't stop the boats, we'll stop the boats."[6][29]

Southern supported similar actions by Defend Europe, which chartered a vessel to track and stop what it claimed was collusion between non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and human traffickers. In July 2017, Southern reported Patreon had deleted her account citing concerns about her "raising funds in order to take part in activities that are likely to cause loss of life".[58] Southern denied these allegations, stating that Defend Europe's actions were likely to save lives and that none of her funding went towards the group.[59]

In November 2018, Southern released a video that appeared to show an NGO worker admitting that she had coached asylum seekers on how to speak to immigration officials in order to gain refugee status. BuzzFeed News reported that a United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) spokesperson said: "Greece has rigorous asylum procedures in place, within a robust legal framework."[60] In May 2019, Southern released a YouTube documentary, Borderless, about the refugee and migrant crisis.[21] The film was temporarily taken down by YouTube.[61]

Gender and feminism

Southern said transgender people have a "genuine delusion", adding "It's body dysmorphia and that is a mental illness".[62] She criticised legal recognition for changing one's gender, because people doing so might be dishonest.[37]

Southern has spoken in opposition to feminism[63] and has said that women are "not psychologically developed to hold leadership positions",[48] and "not going to be as great being CEOs".[62] In a November 2017 YouTube video titled "Why I'm Not Married", Southern said: "I am not trying to sell the idea that myself, as a 22-year-old, needs to be married right now for the sake of traditionalism and not being a degenerate. What is also just completely shocking to me is the utter lack of understanding of nuance." She also said that women should be able to choose their own path in life without being attacked for it.[64]

In June 2015, Southern reported on the Vancouver SlutWalk, a protest march of sexual assault survivors, for The Rebel Media. She said her protest sign stating "There Is No Rape Culture in the West", was torn up.[65] She shouted to the protest in response: "Go to Africa and you will see a real rape culture!".[2][66][67] In third world countries, she said, "men can get away with rape". According to Southern: "It's insane to focus on this one issue and say that we are living in a rape culture. Men are getting fired from their jobs just for making rape jokes – not raping". A protester from a Canadian rape crisis centre told her fewer than an estimated 10% of rapes are reported.[65]

In a 2017 YouTube segment titled "How Feminism Made Women Unhappy", Southern said: "Traditionalism offers a lot of stability in people's life, it offers a guide for how to lead them to the happiest life." Together with Tara McCarthy and Brittany Pettibone, she advocated for women to have fewer sexual partners, saying that the left holds "a cultural Marxist agenda that wants to destroy the family."[68]

Visits and bans

During March 2016, she visited Vancouver for an event at which Augustus Sol Invictus was due to appear. A fringe candidate for a Florida senate seat, Invictus was banned from entering Canada and was absent. At this event, a protester poured a bottle of urine over Southern's head while she was engaging with LGBTQ protesters at a rally in Vancouver, arguing for two human genders.[28][69][70]

In April 2017, Southern was one of several scheduled speakers at a Patriots' Day rally in Berkeley, California.[71] The rally led to a riot between pro-Trump demonstrators and anti-Trump counter-protesters.[72]

In June 2018, she visited Moscow, Russia, to meet Aleksandr Dugin, a political philosopher and proponent of a Russian-dominated Eurasia. A multi-part interview of Dugin, conducted by Southern and Brittany Pettibone, was published on YouTube under the title "From Russia With Love".[73][74][47] "It’s incorrect to call him a fascist," Southern tweeted. In the second video, she said Dugin had both "enthralled" and "open[ed] so many doors" for her.[75] Dugin spoke on a panel with the two women in Moscow.[76]

Websites for crowdfunding (GoFundMe) and business services (Patreon) barred Southern from using their services.[8][9] YouTube demonetized her channel by June 2017 and was no longer running advertisements on it.[26]

Ban on entering the United Kingdom

In February 2018, Southern, along with Pettibone and Caolan Robertson, distributed flyers in the English town of Luton describing Allah as "gay", as part of a social experiment video.[77]

In March 2018, Southern was denied entry to the United Kingdom while waiting in Calais. It was reported that Southern was due to meet Austrian Martin Sellner and his American partner, Pettibone, both far-right activists, while the three of them were in Britain; the couple were deported from Britain a few days earlier.[29][78] Southern was questioned under Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000.[77] Her denial of entry was due to her intentions during her visit.[77][78][79][80][81]

Tucker Carlson of Fox News, describing Southern and the others as reporters, invited Katie Hopkins onto his programme to defend them against supposed political correctness responsible for their non-admission.[82][83]

2018 Australian tour

Before her period of residency in Australia during her brief retirement and afterwards, Southern planned a speaking tour of Australia in July 2018. Australia's Department of Home Affairs denied Lauren Southern an Electronic Travel Authority visa, saying it was "not a working visa".[84] She intended to charge $79 for a basic ticket and up to $749 for an "intimate dinner".[85] The Australian government allowed her to enter the country once she had the correct visa.[86] Arriving at Brisbane airport, she wore an "It's OK to be white" shirt.[63][87]

When she asked people on the street in Melbourne "Should we kill Lauren Southern?", many had never heard of her.[88] A speaking event in Melbourne was opposed by more than 100 protesters.[89]

There were no protesters at her event in Sydney, where ticket holders were notified of the venue by receiving a text on the day.[90] The Sydney event included a $200 meet-and-greet, a $500 VIP meet-and-greet and a $750 dinner.[91]

In Brisbane, Southern mentioned bombing the Australian city of Melbourne, citing and expanding upon the Bible story about finding good people in Sodom and Gomorrah. She ended: "We did find a few hundred good ones there – there is a silent majority I believe in Melbourne so we can’t nuke it yet guys I’m sorry."[92] She was opposed by around 60 protesters.[93]

2018 New Zealand tour

Libertarian politician Stephen Berry speaking at the free speech protest in defence of Southern and Molyneux, Auckland 2018[94]

In July 2018, Southern applied for a travel visa to visit New Zealand for a speaking tour with Canadian podcaster and YouTuber Stefan Molyneux. Immigration Minister Iain Lees-Galloway described their views as "repugnant", but said they met immigration character requirements and cleared their entry.[95] The pair had not secured a venue, as Auckland Council had cancelled their initial booking, citing health and safety concerns.[96] The pair briefly cancelled and then resumed the tour over difficulties with the venue.[97][98][99] The subsequent booking of a private venue was revoked by its owners.[100] In retaliation, their venue was vandalised.[101] The failure to find a venue was celebrated by around 1,000 protesters, who said the planned event had nothing to do with freedom of speech. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said New Zealand is "hostile" to the views of the speakers and, "I think you'll see from the reaction they've had from New Zealanders that their views are not those that are shared by this country, and I'm quite proud of that".[102]

In August 2018, the Mayor of Auckland, Phil Goff, tweeted that Council venues should not be used to "stir up ethnic or religious tensions", and that "we've got no obligation at all" to provide a venue for hate speech.[19][103] For agreeing with the cancellation, Green Party co-leader Marama Davidson received death threats.[104]

Tāmaki Anti Fascist Action spokesperson Sina Brown-Davis said her group feared "dehumanising depictions of indigenous people" in New Zealand.[105] Molyneux had called Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people "the lowest rung of civilisation".[106]

Green Party co-leader Marama Davidson added, "Aotearoa does not stand for your messages of racism, hatred and especially white supremacy".[107] Justice Minister Andrew Little said the speakers "clearly have misled people" in trying to secure the venue.[38] TV personality Te Hamua Nikora said the pair were against multiculturalism, unlike New Zealand.[108] The minimum ticket price for the cancelled Auckland event was $99.[109]

Personal life

As of 2020, Southern lives in Sydney, Australia, with her Australian husband and their child.[2][110] Her husband is part Asian and is credited with introducing her to his Catholic faith.[2]

Brief retirement

On 2 June 2019, Southern announced her retirement from political activism on her website. She stated that her reasons for leaving were that she needed to move on and find fulfillment in a more private capacity.[20]

On 19 June 2020, Southern announced in a YouTube video her return and new plans, expressing some remorse for her previous hardline stances.[21] Daniel Lombroso, in his article for The Atlantic, was skeptical of her change, stating: "She kept telling me she had grown more 'compassionate,' but whenever I asked her pointedly if she regretted her past work, I got obfuscation and tactical apologies."[2]

Notes

  1. ^ a b Sources describing Southern as "alt-right" include:
  2. ^ a b Sources discussing Southern in relation to white nationalism include:
  3. ^ Sources describing Southern as "far-right" include:
  4. ^ Sources describing Southern as "right-wing" include:

References

  1. ^ Warren, Rossalyn (28 July 2017). "Europe's far-right pirates of the Mediterranean are targeting refugee rescue missions". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 26 August 2017. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Lombroso, Daniel (16 October 2020). "Why the Alt-Right's Most Famous Woman Disappeared". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on 15 November 2020. Retrieved 19 December 2020. (Southern denies being a white nationalist.)
  3. ^ a b "About Lauren Southern". YouTube.
  4. ^ Southern, Lauren [@Lauren_Southern] (16 June 2017). "It's my birthday so the only thing I want to see in my notifications today are pictures of your pets or anime versions of politicians. TY" (Tweet). Archived from the original on 27 July 2017. Retrieved 27 July 2017 – via Twitter.
  5. ^ a b c Kabas, Marisa (15 June 2015). "Meet the Canadian college student who's about to be the next enemy of the feminist movement". The Daily Dot. Archived from the original on 28 July 2015.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Claxton, Matthew (17 May 2017). "Former Langley Libertarian candidate detained in Italy". Abbotsford News. Archived from the original on 14 March 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  7. ^ "Why Lauren Southern Got Banned From Patreon". Canadaland. 28 July 2017. Archived from the original on 25 January 2021. Retrieved 24 December 2020.
  8. ^ a b Roose, Kevin (9 August 2017). "The Alt-Right Finds a New Enemy in Silicon Valley". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 30 September 2017. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
  9. ^ a b Montgomery, Blake (2 August 2017). "PayPal, GoFundMe, And Patreon Banned A Bunch Of People Associated With The Alt-Right. Here's Why". BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on 21 December 2020. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
  10. ^ a b c Hurst, Daniel (4 March 2021). "Mehreen Faruqi rejects request by far-right commentator Lauren Southern to apologise for tweet". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 28 March 2021. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  11. ^ a b c d e Williams, Thomas Chatterton (4 December 2017). "The French Origins of 'You Will Not Replace Us'". The New Yorker. Archived from the original on 14 August 2019. Retrieved 7 August 2019.
  12. ^ a b Wilson, Jason (9 August 2020). "Lauren Southern is on the comeback trail, and Australian conservatives are all too happy to help". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 25 December 2020. Retrieved 22 December 2020.
  13. ^ a b Robison-Greene, Rachel; Greene, Richard (2020). Conspiracy Theories: Philosophers Connect the Dots. Open Court. p. 88. ISBN 978-0812694833. Camus's notion of the Great Replacement has been spread by right-wing and white nationalist figures across the world. In July 2018, Lauren Southern, a Canadian alt-right figure posted, a video titled 'The Great Replacement' on YouTube that got over 250,000 views. (Punctuation error in the original.)
  14. ^ Miller, Nick (19 March 2019). "'The Great Replacement': an idea now at the heart of Europe's politics". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 24 January 2020. Retrieved 4 April 2019.
  15. ^ a b c Goldberg, Michelle (6 May 2019). "Trump Helps Bigots Go Viral". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 19 November 2020. Retrieved 22 December 2020. The next year [2018] Southern released a documentary about the threat of 'white genocide' in South Africa. She's a proponent of the 'great replacement' theory, which holds that white Europeans are being systematically supplanted by Muslim migrants.
  16. ^ a b c Dearden, Lizzie (16 March 2019). "New Zealand attack: How nonsensical white genocide conspiracy theory cited by alleged gunman is spreading poison around the world". The Independent. Archived from the original on 16 March 2019. Retrieved 3 January 2021. Other proponents of the white genocide conspiracy theory include former journalist Katie Hopkins, InfoWars' Alex Jones and Canadian YouTuber Lauren Southern.
  17. ^ a b Gordon, Glenna (13 December 2018). "American Women of the Far Right". The New York Review of Books. Archived from the original on 8 January 2021. Retrieved 6 January 2021. Southern made a film about 'white genocide' in South Africa, a conspiracy theory that was picked up by Tucker Carlson on Fox News and led President Trump to tweet about the subject.
  18. ^ Barthélemy, Hélène (12 April 2018). "Far-right YouTuber Lauren Southern banned from the U.K. speaks at European Parliament, spreads narrative of white genocide in South Africa". Southern Poverty Law Center. Archived from the original on 8 January 2021. Retrieved 6 January 2021. Southern has become a figurehead of the South African 'white genocide' narrative, after traveling to the country to produce a documentary on the murders of white farmers in the country.
  19. ^ a b Hatton, Emma (6 July 2018). "Far-right pair banned from speaking at Auckland Council venues – Phil Goff". Radio New Zealand. Archived from the original on 10 July 2019. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  20. ^ a b Southern, Lauren (2 June 2019). "A New Chapter". Archived from the original on 3 June 2019. Retrieved 3 June 2019.
  21. ^ a b c Graham, Ben (21 June 2020). "Alt-right activist Lauren Southern appears after a year offline, saying she's changed". The New Zealand Herald. Archived from the original on 21 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2020.
  22. ^ a b c Whyte, Lara (28 September 2019). "The women flying the flag for Generation Identity and far-right politics". The Times. Archived from the original on 24 February 2020. Retrieved 28 January 2022. When we speak, Southern flatly denies being racist or even far right, then ends our conversation by predicting a race war and quoting Enoch Powell.
  23. ^ a b Metz, Cade (15 April 2021). "Feeding Hate With Video: A Former Alt-Right YouTuber Explains His Methods". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 17 April 2021. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  24. ^ "Lauren Southern profile". Libertarian Party of Canada. Archived from the original on 10 June 2016. Retrieved 1 July 2016.
  25. ^ Claxton, Matthew (26 August 2015). "Langley post-secondary student runs as Libertarian". Langley Advance. Archived from the original on 31 October 2016. Retrieved 30 October 2016.
  26. ^ a b c d Broderick, Ryan (22 June 2017). "Far-Right Activists Are Stealing Tricks From YouTubers And It's Going To Get People Hurt". BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
  27. ^ "Official Voting Results | British Columbia, Langley–Aldergrove | Forty-second General Election, 2015". www.elections.ca. Archived from the original on 15 August 2016. Retrieved 13 December 2017.
  28. ^ a b c d e Kelley, Brendan Joel (7 November 2017). "Lauren Southern: The alt-right's Canadian dog whistler". Hatewatch. Southern Poverty Law Center. Archived from the original on 6 August 2018. Retrieved 30 August 2018.
  29. ^ a b c d e f "Brittany Pettibone and Lauren Southern Are Not "Conservative" Activists or "Journalists"". Hope Not Hate. 14 March 2018. Archived from the original on 21 June 2019. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
  30. ^ Donato, Al (7 October 2016). "When Rebel Media Reporters Fake Being Trans, They're Not Doing Journalism". Torontoist. Archived from the original on 8 October 2016. Retrieved 28 January 2022.
  31. ^ Southern, Lauren (2016). Barbarians: How Baby Boomers, Immigrants, and Islam Screwed My Generation. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. ISBN 978-1541136946.
  32. ^ Southern, Lauren (9 March 2017). Going Independent. Archived from the original on 10 March 2017 – via YouTube.
  33. ^ López G., Christina (14 March 2017). "Meet Lauren Southern, The Latest "Alt-Right" Media Troll To Gain Access To The White House Press Briefing". Media Matters for America. Archived from the original on 6 January 2020.
  34. ^ Kestenbaum, Sam (15 March 2017). "Trump's White House Welcomes 5 New Far-Right Figures". The Forward. Archived from the original on 7 August 2019.
  35. ^ Stern, Alexandra Minna (2019). Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate: How the Alt-Right Is Warping the American Imagination. Boston, Mass.: Beacon Press. p. 101. ISBN 978-0807063361. As a home for the small but active alt-right sisterhood, Radio 3Fourteen brings together female alt-righters with their followers on social media. Regulars include ... Canadian white nationalists Lauren Southern and Faith Goldy
  36. ^ "Fear controversial far-right pair's speech will incite racism: 'They were mocking Aboriginal culture'". TVNZ. 2 August 2018. Archived from the original on 4 August 2018. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  37. ^ a b "Explainer: What do far-right Canadian speakers Stefan Molyneux and Lauren Southern believe?". Newshub. 20 July 2018. Archived from the original on 6 August 2018. Retrieved 6 August 2018.
  38. ^ a b Fisher, David (4 August 2018). "Andrew Little happy 'insidious' alt-right pair leaving the country as bomb threat claim emerges". NZ Herald. Archived from the original on 7 August 2018. Retrieved 6 August 2018.
  39. ^ "Lauren Southern in Australia: 'I feel zero shame whatsoever for being white'". The Australian. 13 July 2018.
  40. ^ Bueskens, Petra (9 August 2018). "It's OK To Be Right, But Careful What You Wish For Lauren Southern". New Matilda. Archived from the original on 11 August 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  41. ^ a b Bedo, Stephanie (26 July 2018). "Lauren Southern stirs up controversy sharing 'Asian only' ad". News.com. News Corp Australia. Archived from the original on 11 August 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  42. ^ Weitzmann, Marc (1 April 2019). "The Global Language of Hatred Is French". Foreign Affairs. Archived from the original on 4 August 2019. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  43. ^ Weiss, Michael; Ebner, Julia (14 May 2019). "The strange tale of an unlikely racist slogan that went viral – to lethal effect". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 26 January 2021. Retrieved 22 December 2020.
  44. ^ [11][13][15][16][42][43]
  45. ^ Koul, Saachi (19 August 2017). "Hey, America, Now You Have Our Worst People. You're Welcome". BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on 31 August 2018. Retrieved 30 August 2018.
  46. ^ Roeper, Richard (21 October 2020). "White Noise highlights the small lives, not the ugly views, of white nationalists". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on 2 November 2020. Retrieved 24 December 2020. We also spend time with the infamous neo-Nazi Richard Spencer, who gave a speech in which he boomed 'Hail Trump!' after the election and was one of the primary players in the Charlottesville marches, and Mike Cernovich, a misogynist hatemonger who peddles his brand of B.S. with all the subtlety and earnestness of a 19th century snake oil salesman.
  47. ^ a b Zappone, Chris (12 August 2018). "The high price of 'white genocide' politics for Australia". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 30 August 2018. Retrieved 3 January 2021.
  48. ^ a b Urban, Rebecca (20 July 2018). "Lauren Southern: protesters out to disrupt right wing commentator's event". The Australian. Archived from the original on 11 March 2021. Retrieved 20 July 2018.
  49. ^ Baidawi, Adam (3 April 2018). "South Africa Says Australia Retracted Claim of 'Persecuted' White Farmers". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 16 April 2018. Retrieved 3 January 2021. [South Africa's minister of international relations and cooperation] Ms. [Lindiwe] Sisulu said that nongovernmental organizations had been distributing inaccurate statistics about the killings of white farmers and sowing panic.
  50. ^ Williams, Jennifer (23 August 2018). "Trump's tweet echoing white nationalist propaganda about South African farmers, explained". Vox. Archived from the original on 23 August 2018. Retrieved 3 January 2021. The story isn't real. There is no evidence of a widespread campaign of violence and murder targeting white farmers in South Africa.
  51. ^ Stern, Alexandra Minna (2019). Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate: How the Alt-Right Is Warping the American Imagination. Boston, Mass.: Beacon Press. p. 131. ISBN 9780807063361. it is an open secret that white nationalists are the primary group making the most noise about the ostensibly out-of-control killing of white South African farmers. Most notably, Lauren Southern, a Canadian nationalist ... released the movie Farmlands.
  52. ^ McKenzie, David; Swails, Brent (November 2019). "They're prepping for a race war. And they see Trump as their 'ray of hope'". CNN. Archived from the original on 14 April 2019. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  53. ^ "AfD-Politiker in Südafrika: Schießtraining mit Rassisten" [AfD politician in South Africa: Shooting practice with racists]. tagesschau.de (in German). ARD. 18 December 2018. Archived from the original on 5 April 2019. Retrieved 5 April 2019. Nach Einschätzung von Gareth Newham vom südafrikanischen Institute for Security Studies in Pretoria handelt es sich bei den "Suidlanders" um einen Zusammenschluss von völkischen Rassisten: "Ihre Ideologie ist die Überlegenheit der weißen Rasse", sagte Newham. "Ihr einziger Existenzgrund ist die angebliche Verteidigung gegen die Schwarzen. Man kann sie eindeutig als rassistische völkische Organisation beschreiben. [According to Gareth Newham of the South African Institute for Security Studies in Pretoria, the "Suidlanders" constitute an association of populist Racists: "Their ideology is the superiority of the white race," says Newham. "Their singular reason for existing is to supposedly defend against blacks. One can clearly describe them as a racist populist organization"]
  54. ^ Gedye, Lloyd (23 March 2018). "White genocide: How the big lie spread to the US and beyond". The Mail & Guardian. Retrieved 22 November 2022.
  55. ^ Broderick, Ryan (26 July 2017). "Everything That's Happened Since A Bunch Of YouTubers Got A Ship To Stop Refugees Getting To Europe". World. BuzzFeed News. Catania, Italy. Archived from the original on 26 September 2020. Retrieved 11 October 2020.
  56. ^ Arsalai, Mohammed Harun (26 May 2017). "Who is really responsible for deadly refugee journeys?". Al Jazeera. Archived from the original on 11 November 2020. Retrieved 24 December 2020.
  57. ^ De Lorenzo, Giuseppe (13 May 2017). "Migranti, blitz contro l'Ong: identiatari bloccano la nave che va in Libia". Il Giornale (in Italian). Archived from the original on 7 June 2017. Retrieved 28 January 2022.
  58. ^ Gilmour, David (8 August 2017). "How Patreon stepped into a war between Antifa and the alt-right". The Daily Dot. Archived from the original on 9 August 2017. Retrieved 23 January 2020.
  59. ^ Gordon, Graeme (27 July 2017). "Why Lauren Southern Got Banned From Patreon". Canadaland. Archived from the original on 18 August 2017. Retrieved 17 August 2017.
  60. ^ Buchanan, Rose Troup; Broderick, Ryan (13 November 2018). "A Far-Right YouTuber Has Been Secretly Recording NGO Workers Inside One Of Europe's Worst Refugee Camps". BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on 14 June 2019. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  61. ^ Dougherty, Michael Brendan (30 May 2019). "Silicon Valley, America's De Facto Censor". National Review. Archived from the original on 1 June 2019. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  62. ^ a b Deutrom, Rhian (20 July 2018). "Women 'not developed' to be CEOs, activist Lauren Southern says". The Australian. Archived from the original on 13 January 2020. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
  63. ^ a b Singhal, Pallavi (14 July 2018). "'It's OK to be white': Far right YouTuber Lauren Southern lands in Australia". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 15 January 2021. Retrieved 6 January 2021.
  64. ^ Leah, Rachel (4 December 2017). ""Alt-right" women are upset that "alt-right" men are treating them terribly". Salon. Retrieved 22 November 2022.
  65. ^ a b Richards, Victoria (10 June 2015). "Woman holds sign at feminist rally saying 'there is no rape culture in the West'". The Independent. Archived from the original on 28 July 2020. Retrieved 22 December 2020.
  66. ^ Lachenal, Jessica (9 March 2016). "Internet Jerks Pledge to Make Internet Even Worse in #TheTriggering". The Mary Sue. Archived from the original on 23 September 2016. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  67. ^ Cloutier, Jean-François (14 June 2015). "Lauren Southern troll la SlutWalk en disant "il n'y a pas de culture du viol en occident"". TVQC. Archived from the original on 1 July 2017. Retrieved 28 January 2022.
  68. ^ Peled, Shachar (5 November 2017). "Ladies' Night at the Alt-right: Meet the Women Trying to Soften the White Nationalist Movement". Haaretz. Retrieved 26 June 2022.
  69. ^ Raptis, Mike (7 March 2016). "Activist accused of pouring bottle of urine on Rebel reporter during 'anti-fascist' rally in Vancouver". National Post. Postmedia News. Archived from the original on 24 January 2020. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  70. ^ Christian, Natasha (8 March 2016). "Protester pours urine on journalist for 'hateful' comments". Yahoo! News. Archived from the original on 11 June 2016. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  71. ^ Robb, Amanda (26 April 2017). "Exclusive: The Canadian extremists inside the Berkeley violence". National Observer. Observer Media Group. Archived from the original on 18 June 2017. Retrieved 13 March 2018. On April 15, American activists, many of whom support closed U.S. borders, held a "Patriots Day" rally in Berkeley, California. One of the marquee speakers was Lauren Southern, a Canadian.
  72. ^ Mahbubani, Rhea; Smith, Christie (15 April 2017). "Clashes Break Out at Opposing Rallies in Berkeley". NBC Bay Area. Archived from the original on 16 April 2017. Retrieved 15 April 2017.
  73. ^ Wilson, Jason (16 July 2018). "News Corp Australia's promotion of Lauren Southern is disturbing". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 17 July 2018. Retrieved 22 December 2020.
  74. ^ Weill, Kelly (26 July 2018). "American Racists Look for Allies in Russia". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on 25 November 2020. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
  75. ^ Michel, Casey (10 June 2018). "Why is this Pizzagate truther meeting with a Russian neo-fascist?". ThinkProgress. Archived from the original on 22 December 2020. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
  76. ^ Ross, Alexander Reid (13 June 2018). "How Trump's Foreign Policy Is Making Russian Fascism Great Again". Haaretz. Archived from the original on 18 December 2020. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
  77. ^ a b c "Why 3 anti-Islam activists were refused entry to the UK". BBC News. 14 March 2018. Archived from the original on 18 March 2018. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  78. ^ a b Oppenheim, Maya (13 March 2018). "Far-right Canadian activist detained in Calais and banned from entering UK". The Independent. Archived from the original on 18 March 2018. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  79. ^ "Canadian far-right activist Lauren Southern barred from Britain for anti-Muslim views". National Post. 12 March 2018. Archived from the original on 13 March 2018. Retrieved 2 August 2018.
  80. ^ Hosenball, Mark (12 March 2018). "British authorities ban three foreign right-wing activists". Reuters. Archived from the original on 20 March 2018. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  81. ^ Grafton-Green, Patrick (15 March 2018). "Lauren Southern defended by Nigel Farage after right wing Canadian activist was barred from UK". Evening Standard. London. Archived from the original on 21 June 2019. Retrieved 23 July 2018.
  82. ^ "Tucker Carlson defends white nationalist "Pizzagate" conspiracy theorist after she was barred from entering U.K." Media Matters for America. 13 March 2018. Archived from the original on 7 December 2020. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
  83. ^ Marcotte, Amanda (19 March 2018). "Alt-right is dying, but powerful conservatives are mainstreaming its ideas". Salon. Archived from the original on 22 December 2020. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
  84. ^ "Visa approved for Canadian who warns Australian way of life is under threat". SBS. 10 July 2018. Archived from the original on 10 July 2018. Retrieved 10 July 2018.
  85. ^ Chung, Frank (10 July 2018). "Australian government declines visa for right-wing activist Lauren Southern ahead of speaking tour". News.com.au. Archived from the original on 16 January 2019. Retrieved 19 February 2019.
  86. ^ "Lauren Southern's Australian visa approved after all". News.com.au. 10 July 2018. Archived from the original on 10 July 2018. Retrieved 10 July 2018.
  87. ^ Chung, Frank (13 July 2018). "Lauren Southern lands in Brisbane wearing 'It's okay to be white' T-shirt". News.com.au. Archived from the original on 15 July 2018. Retrieved 15 July 2018.
  88. ^ "'You're not welcome': Southern's run-in with police". The Queensland Times. 28 July 2018. Archived from the original on 1 August 2018. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  89. ^ "Protesters disrupt Lauren Southern event in Melbourne". SBS. 20 July 2018. Archived from the original on 31 July 2018. Retrieved 31 July 2018.
  90. ^ Smith, Douglas (30 July 2018). "Far-right Canadian duo's vile rampage against Aboriginal culture at Sydney event". SBS. Archived from the original on 30 July 2018. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  91. ^ Kinsella, Luke (30 July 2018). "What I learnt about the far right from Lauren Southern". News.com.au. Archived from the original on 31 July 2018. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  92. ^ "Lauren Southern insults Melbourne, city fires back". News.com.au. 4 August 2018. Archived from the original on 14 August 2018. Retrieved 14 August 2018.
  93. ^ Chirgwin, Sophie (30 July 2018). "Alt right activist Lauren Southern targeted in Brisbane". The Courier-Mail. Archived from the original on 30 July 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  94. ^ Braae, Alex (14 July 2018). "What did the Free Speech protestors actually have to say?". Archived from the original on 14 February 2021. Retrieved 22 February 2021.
  95. ^ Satherley, Dan (21 July 2018). "Protests outside Lauren Southern speaking gig in Melbourne". Newshub. Archived from the original on 21 July 2018. Retrieved 21 July 2018.
  96. ^ Fonseka, Dileepa (20 July 2018). "Lauren Southern and Stefan Molyneux have 'visas in hand' and will come to NZ, organiser says". Stuff. Auckland Now. Archived from the original on 20 July 2018. Retrieved 20 July 2018.
  97. ^ Niall, Todd (25 July 2018). "Right-wing Canadian speakers' visit canned, legal action on back burner". Stuff. Auckland Now. Archived from the original on 25 July 2018. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  98. ^ "Canadian far-right speakers Lauren Southern, Stefan Molyneux coming to New Zealand after securing Auckland speaking venue". 1 News. 26 July 2018. Archived from the original on 26 July 2018. Retrieved 26 July 2018.
  99. ^ Todd, Niall (26 July 2018). "Canadian Right-wing speakers' Auckland tour is on, with a new venue". Stuff. Auckland Now. Archived from the original on 26 July 2018. Retrieved 26 July 2018.
  100. ^ Truebridge, Nick; Todd, Niall (3 August 2018). "Auckland's Powerstation owner apologises for booking controversial speakers". Stuff. Auckland Now. Archived from the original on 20 July 2019. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  101. ^ "Powerstation vandalised after cancelling Lauren Southern and Stefan Molyneux event". Newshub. 6 August 2018. Archived from the original on 6 August 2018. Retrieved 6 August 2018.
  102. ^ Ensor, Jamie; Macdonald, Laura (4 August 2018). "NZ 'hostile' to views of Lauren Southern and Stefan Molyneux – Jacinda Arden". Newshub. Archived from the original on 4 August 2018. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  103. ^ "Controversial Canadian speaker denied visa as Auckland agency cancels booking". Stuff. Auckland Now. 6 July 2018. Archived from the original on 29 September 2018. Retrieved 29 September 2018.
  104. ^ "Green Party co-leader Marama Davidson receives death threats". Newshub. 8 July 2018. Archived from the original on 18 July 2018. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  105. ^ Theunissen, Matthew (2 August 2018). "Most read: Fear controversial far-right pair's speech will incite racism: 'They were mocking Aboriginal culture'". 1 News. Archived from the original on 4 August 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  106. ^ Smith, Douglas (30 July 2018). "Far-right Canadian duo's vile rampage against Aboriginal culture at Sydney event". SBS. Archived from the original on 30 July 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  107. ^ ""Hope NZ enjoys shariah" – Alt-right speakers' agent responds to having their Auckland event at The Powerstation cancelled last-minute". 1 News. 4 August 2018. Archived from the original on 5 August 2018. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  108. ^ "Watch: Canadian far-right speakers blame threats of violence amounting to 'straight up terrorism' for Auckland event cancellation". 1 News. 3 August 2018. Archived from the original on 3 August 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  109. ^ "Auckland venue cancels controversial far-right Canadian pair's speaking event". 1 News. 3 August 2018. Archived from the original on 14 January 2019. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  110. ^ Brook, Stephen; Hutchinson, Samantha (1 October 2020). "Alt-right activist Lauren Southern dumped from Conservative conference". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 5 October 2020. Retrieved 5 October 2020.

External links