Laurie Koehn

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Laurie Koehn
Personal information
Born (1982-05-13) May 13, 1982 (age 35)
Newton, Kansas
Nationality American
Listed height 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Listed weight 145 lb (66 kg)
Career information
High school Moundridge (Moundridge, Kansas)
College Kansas State (2001–2005)
WNBA draft 2005 / Undrafted
Playing career 2005–present
Position Point guard
Career history
2005–2008 Washington Mystics
2012 Atlanta Dream
Stats at WNBA.com

Laurie Koehn (born May 13, 1982)[1] is a professional basketball player who most recently played for the Atlanta Dream of the WNBA.

Education[edit]

Born in Newton, Kansas, Koehn attended Moundridge High School in Moundridge, Kansas. Koehn graduated from Kansas State University in 2005. While at K-state, Koehn achieved the All-Big 12 Second Team (2005, 2004), CoSIDA Academic All-American (2004), Big 12 All-Academic First Team (2005), Kansas State, Big 12 and NCAA all-time leader in three-pointers made (392). She once hit 132 out of 135 three pointers in a 5-minute period.[2] Over the course of her college career, she hit 392 three-pointers, making her the NCAA Division I record-holder for made three-point attempts (tied with Heather Butler), a record she held until it was surpassed by Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis in 2015.[3]

USA Basketball[edit]

Koehn was a member of the USA Women's U18 team which won the gold medal at the FIBA Americas Championship in Mar Del Plata, Argentina. The event was held in July 2000, when the USA team defeated Cuba to win the championship. Koehn started all five games and averaged 12.4 points per game, third highest behind Alana Beard and Diana Taurasi.[4]

Koehn was named to the team representing the USA at the 2003 Pan American Games. The team lost the opening game to Cuba, then rebounded to win their next five games, including an overtime win against Brazil. They then faced Cuba for the gold medal, falling short 75–64 to take home the silver medal. Koehn averaged 8.9 points per game while hitting 17 of 30 three point attempts, to lead her team in made three pointers and percentage.[5]

Kansas State statistics[edit]

Source[6]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high
Year Team GP Points FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2001-02 Kansas State 34 600 45.1 42.2 89.5 3.4 2.5 1.1 0.1 17.6
2002-03 Kansas State 24 317 42.2 41.1 82.5 3.4 1.8 0.8 0.1 13.2
2003-04 Kansas State 31 419 45.6 43.5 86.7 2.4 1.3 0.7 0.0 13.5
2004-05 Kansas State 32 397 40.8 39.5 90.0 2.8 1.5 1.1 0.1 12.4
Career Kansas State 121 1733 43.6 41.6 87.7 3.0 1.8 0.9 0.1 14.3

WNBA career[edit]

Koehn was signed as a free-agent with the Washington Mystics in 2005. On April 30, 2009 Koehn signed a training camp contract with the Phoenix Mercury. On June 3, 2009 Koehn was waived along with 2 others. Extending her professional career, Laurie played during the 2010-11 season for the "Utex Row", a women's basketball team in Poland. Unfortunately, the team ended the season ranked twelfth out of the 13 member league. Koehn, however, performed well playing in all 14 games, averaging 17.9 points per game and tallying up an average of 36.4 minutes of play per game.

Club history[edit]

Coaching career[edit]

In July 2015, Laurie Koehn was named as an assistant coach for the University of Northern Colorado women's basketball team.[7]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mercury Signs Laurie Koehn". April 30, 2009. Retrieved 17 Feb 2014. 
  2. ^ 132/135 3 points shouts YouTube video
  3. ^ Fuller, Jim (30 March 2015). "UConn's Mosqueda-Lewis sets NCAA 3-point record". New Haven Register. Journal Register CT. Retrieved 23 Apr 2015. 
  4. ^ "Fourth Women's Junior World Championship Qualifying Team -- 2000". USA Basketball. June 10, 2010. Archived from the original on 12 September 2015. Retrieved 20 October 2015. 
  5. ^ "Fourteenth Pan American Games -- 2003". USA Basketball. February 20, 2014. Archived from the original on 7 September 2015. Retrieved 15 October 2015. 
  6. ^ "NCAA® Career Statistics". web1.ncaa.org. Retrieved 2016-05-21. 
  7. ^ "Women's Basketball Adds Two New Assistants". Retrieved 26 Jul 2015.