Lawrence Hilton-Jacobs

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Lawrence Hilton-Jacobs
Welcome Back Kotter Lawrence Hilton-Jacobs 1976.jpg
Lawrence Hilton-Jacobs, c. 1976
Born (1953-09-04) September 4, 1953 (age 65)
New York City, New York
United States
Occupation Actor, Singer
Years active 1974–present

Lawrence Hilton-Jacobs (born September 4, 1953)[1] is an American actor and singer. He has appeared in a number of films and television shows, including Claudine (1974), Cooley High (1975), Roots (1977), Welcome Back, Kotter (1975–79), Bangers and Mash (1983), and The Jacksons: An American Dream (1992).

Life and career[edit]

Hilton-Jacobs was born in New York City, New York, United States, the fifth of nine children of parents Hilton Jacobs (deceased 2000) and Clothilda Jacobs (deceased 2008).[2] He attended Wilkes University for a short time before his acting career took off. He began his acting career in the summer of 1969 and graduated from the High School of Art and Design in 1971. Afterward, he studied acting with the world-famous Negro Ensemble Company and the Al Fann Theatrical Ensemble.

In 1975, he won the role of Freddie "Boom Boom" Washington on the ABC hit comedy series, Welcome Back, Kotter. Hilton-Jacobs starred in a few commercials over the years, including an early 1970s commercial for The United Negro College Fund. Later in his career, he appeared in the 1989-1990 science fiction TV series Alien Nation as Sgt. Dobbs, an LAPD detective.[3] He portrayed Panda Thomas (#1) in Rob Zombie's slasher film 31.[4]

Hilton-Jacobs portrayed Joseph Walter "Joe" Jackson, the father of the Jackson family, in the 1992 miniseries The Jacksons: An American Dream. He also appeared in a commercial for Salon Selectives.

Hilton-Jacobs sang on Rick James' 1981 album Street Songs.

As an homage to him, the public housing in Eddie Murphy's television program The PJs is named the Hilton-Jacobs Projects.

He has two daughters.[5]

Credits[edit]

Film credits[edit]

  • Claudine (1974) – Charles
  • Death Wish (1974) – uncredited appearance as a mugger near the end of the film
  • The Gambler (1974) - Street Basketball Boy (uncredited)
  • Cooley High (1975) – Cochise
  • Youngblood (1978) – Rommel
  • The Annihilators (1985) – Floyd
  • Paramedics (1988) – Blade Runner
  • L.A. Heat (1989) – Det. Jon Chance
  • Angels of the City (1989, DTV) – Det. Jon Chance
  • L.A. Vice (1989) – Det. Jon Chance
  • East L.A. Warriors (1989) - Chesare
  • Chance (1989) – Det. Jon Chance
  • Kill Crazy (1990, DTV) - Rubin
  • Quietfire (1991, DTV) – Jesse Palmer
  • Tuesday Never Comes (1992) - Druilet
  • Indecent Behavior (1993) – Lou Parsons
  • Mr. Right Now! (1999, DTV) - Lawrence-Hilton Jacobs
  • Southlander (2001) – Motherchild
  • Killer Drag Queens on Dope (2003) - Mr. Fly
  • 30 Miles (2004) – Anthony
  • Sublime (2007) – Mandingo
  • Otis (2008) – Orderly
  • Young American Gangstas (2009) - Elmer Reese
  • Nocturnal Agony (2011) – Theodore
  • Playin' for Love (2013) - Coach Preston Reid
  • Airplane vs. Volcano (2014) - Jim Kirkland
  • Mercy for Angels (2015) - Chief
  • Tamales and Gumbo (2015) – Mr. Walker
  • Dead Man Rising (2016) - Warden Dallas
  • 31 (2016) — Panda Thomas/#1

Television credits[edit]

Stage credits[edit]

Screenwriting credits[edit]

  • L.A. Vice
  • Angels Of The City

Music credits[edit]

  • Lawrence Hilton-Jacobs S/T (1978)
  • All the Way...Love (1979)
  • Let Me Do It (1981) (producer); performed by Halo; sought-after record among collectors.

References[edit]

External links[edit]