Lawrence J. Timmerman Airport

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Coordinates: 43°06′37″N 088°02′04″W / 43.11028°N 88.03444°W / 43.11028; -88.03444

Lawrence J. Timmerman Airport
Timmerman Field (MWC).JPG
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner Milwaukee County
Serves Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Elevation AMSL 745 ft / 227 m
Website http://www.timmermanairport.com/
Map
MWC is located in Wisconsin
MWC
MWC
MWC is located in the US
MWC
MWC
Location of airport in Wisconsin / United States
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
15L/33R 4,103 1,251 Asphalt
15R/33L 3,231 985 Turf
4L/22R 3,201 976 Asphalt
4R/22L 2,839 865 Turf
Statistics
Aircraft operations (2013) 30,466
Based aircraft (2017) 68

Lawrence J. Timmerman Airport (IATA: MWCICAO: KMWCFAA LID: MWC), known locally as Timmerman Field, is an airport in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States, owned by Milwaukee County. Located 5 mi (8 km) northwest of the city center, it is used mainly for general or private aviation.[1] It is included in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2017–2021, in which it is categorized as a regional reliever airport facility.[2]

History[edit]

The airport was built in 1929 and dedicated on July 6, 1930,[3] one of 25 such projects in U.S. cities by the newly incorporated airplane manufacturer Curtiss-Wright.[4] The airport was originally known as Curtiss-Wright Field, hence the letters "WC" in its airport codes.[5] In 1945, Curtiss-Wright sold it to Fliteways, Inc., the airport's property manager since 1936.[6] Milwaukee County purchased the airport from Fliteways in July 1947, when it was 131 acres (53 ha) in size.[7][8][9] It was host to the Experimental Aircraft Association's earliest Fly-In Conventions from 1953 to 1958. The airport was renamed in July 1959 for Lawrence J. Timmerman (1878–1959), chairman of the Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors from 1936 to 1959.[10][11]

Current Users[edit]

Lawrence J. Timmerman Airport currently serves various general aviation groups. The current fixed-base operator is Gran Aire. The airport is home to the Milwaukee chapter of Youth and Aviation, as well as two Civil Air Patrol squadrons; the Timmerman Composite Squadron, and Milwaukee Senior Support Squadron 10. The airport also serves many private and public users.

Facilities and aircraft[edit]

Lawrence J. Timmerman Airport covers an area of 420 acres (170 ha) which contains two asphalt paved runways: 15L/33R measuring 4,103 x 75 ft (1,251 x 23 m) and 4L/22R measuring 3,201 x 75 ft (976 x 23 m). It also has two turf runways: 4R/22L measuring 2,839 x 270 ft (865 x 82 m) and 15R/33L measuring 3,231 x 270 ft (985 x 82 m).[1]

For the 12-month period ending December 31, 2013, the airport had 30,466 aircraft operations, an average of 83 per day: 98% general aviation, 1% air taxi and <1% military. In March 2017, there were 68 aircraft based at this airport: 56 single-engine, 8 multi-engine, 2 jet and 2 helicopter.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Master Record for MWC (Form 5010 PDF), effective Mar 2, 2017.
  2. ^ "List of NPIAS Airports" (PDF). FAA.gov. Federal Aviation Administration. 21 October 2016. Retrieved 23 November 2016. 
  3. ^ "Flying Stunts to Open Field", The Milwaukee Journal, July 3, 1930, p. 3.
  4. ^ "Born of Foresight, Timmerman Field Grows Big, Fast", The Milwaukee Journal, October 10, 1968, Accent section, p. 1.
  5. ^ Mason City (Iowa) Municipal Airport, opened in 1927, has the airport code "MCW". Mason City Airport History.
  6. ^ "Curtiss-Wright Airport Is Sold", The Milwaukee Journal, December 11, 1945, sec. 2, p. 1.
  7. ^ "County Votes Purchase of Curtiss-Wright Field", The Milwaukee Journal, April 24, 1946, sec. 2, p. 1.
  8. ^ "Curtiss-Wright Favored as Minor County Field", The Milwaukee Journal, April 12, 1946, p. 20.
  9. ^ "County Eyes Curtiss Airport", The Milwaukee Journal, June 5, 1947, Final section, p. 1.
  10. ^ "Timmerman Fete Today at Airport", The Milwaukee Sentinel, July 21, 1959, sec. 2, p. 1.
  11. ^ "Timmerman Death Ends Civic Career", The Milwaukee Sentinel, October 6, 1959, sec. 2, p. 1.

External links[edit]