Lawrence Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey

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Not to be confused with Lawrence Township, Mercer County.
Lawrence Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Lawrence
Old Stone Church
Lawrence Township highlighted in Cumberland County. Inset map: Cumberland County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Lawrence Township highlighted in Cumberland County. Inset map: Cumberland County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lawrence Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lawrence Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°20′06″N 75°11′04″W / 39.334878°N 75.184579°W / 39.334878; -75.184579Coordinates: 39°20′06″N 75°11′04″W / 39.334878°N 75.184579°W / 39.334878; -75.184579[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Cumberland
Incorporated February 17, 1885
Named for Capt. James Lawrence
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Body Township Committee
 • Mayor Joseph A. Miletta Jr. (D, term ends December 31, 2017)[3][4]
 • Clerk Ruth A. Dawson[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 38.332 sq mi (99.279 km2)
 • Land 36.917 sq mi (95.614 km2)
 • Water 1.415 sq mi (3.665 km2)  3.69%
Area rank 60th of 566 in state
6th of 14 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 39 ft (12 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 3,290
 • Estimate (2015)[11] 3,227
 • Rank 439th of 566 in state
9th of 14 in county[12]
 • Density 89.1/sq mi (34.4/km2)
 • Density rank 546th of 566 in state
10th of 14 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08311 - Cedarville[13]
Area code(s) 856 exchange: 447[14]
FIPS code 3401139450[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882060[1][17]
Website Official website

Lawrence Township is a township in Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States. It is part of the Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area for statistical purposes. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,290,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 569 (+20.9%) from the 2,721 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 288 (+11.8%) from the 2,433 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Lawrence Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 17, 1885, from portions of Fairfield Township.[19] The township was namedin honor of Captain James Lawrence — commander of the frigate USS Chesapeake and one of the naval heroes of the War of 1812 — best known for his dying command of "Don't Give up the Ship".[20]

Lawrence Township is a dry township where alcohol cannot be sold.[21][22]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 38.332 square miles (99.279 km2), including 36.917 square miles (95.614 km2) as land and 1.415 square miles (3.665 km2) of water (3.69%).[1][2]

Cedarville (2010 population of 776[23]) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within Lawrence Township.[24]

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Centre Grove, Jones Island, Lummis Mill, Lummistown and Sayres Neck.[25]

The township borders Fairfield Township, Millville, Downe Township, and the Delaware Bay.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 1,729
1900 1,658 −4.1%
1910 1,746 5.3%
1920 1,549 −11.3%
1930 1,770 14.3%
1940 1,754 −0.9%
1950 2,044 16.5%
1960 2,639 29.1%
1970 2,329 −11.7%
1980 2,116 −9.1%
1990 2,433 15.0%
2000 2,721 11.8%
2010 3,290 20.9%
Est. 2015 3,227 [11][26] −1.9%
Population sources:
1890-2000[27] 1890-1920[28]
1890-1910[29] 1910-1930[30]
1930-1990[31] 2000[32][33] 2010[8]

Census 2010[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,290 people, 1,102 households, and 849.6 families residing in the township. The population density was 89.1 per square mile (34.4/km2). There were 1,221 housing units at an average density of 33.1 per square mile (12.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 81.03% (2,666) White, 9.24% (304) Black or African American, 1.16% (38) Native American, 0.40% (13) Asian, 0.03% (1) Pacific Islander, 5.02% (165) from other races, and 3.13% (103) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.37% (374) of the population.[8]

There were 1,102 households out of which 36.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.9% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.9% were non-families. 17.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.95 and the average family size was 3.28.[8]

In the township, the population was spread out with 26.2% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 27.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.8 years. For every 100 females there were 99.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 100.1 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $70,948 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,480) and the median family income was $72,014 (+/- $2,843). Males had a median income of $55,208 (+/- $6,323) versus $30,382 (+/- $5,144) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,934 (+/- $3,545). About 5.2% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.1% of those under age 18 and 8.6% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 2,721 people, 920 households, and 712 families residing in the township. The population density was 72.6 people per square mile (28.0/km²). There were 1,023 housing units at an average density of 27.3 per square mile (10.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 81.88% White, 10.40% African American, 1.07% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.18% Pacific Islander, 3.42% from other races, and 2.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.02% of the population.[32][33]

There were 920 households out of which 38.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.8% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.6% were non-families. 17.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.27.[32][33]

In the township the population was spread out with 28.5% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 23.3% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.2 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the township was $46,083, and the median income for a family was $48,456. Males had a median income of $36,891 versus $22,188 for females. The per capita income for the township was $17,654. About 6.2% of families and 8.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Lawrence Township is governed under the Township form of government. The governing body is a three-member Township Committee, whose members are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6][35] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2017, members of the Lawrence Township Council are Mayor Joseph Miletta Jr. (D, term on committee ends December 31, 2018; term as mayor ends 2017), Deputy Mayor Elmer "Skip" Bowman (R, term on committee ends 2017; term as deputy mayor ends 2016) and G. Erwin Sheppard (R, 2016).[3][36][37][38][39][40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Lawrence Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 1st state legislative district.[9][42][43] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Lawrence Township had been in the 3rd state legislative district.[44]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[45] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[46] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[47][48]

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 1st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jeff Van Drew (D, Dennis Township) and in the General Assembly by Bob Andrzejczak (D, Middle Township) and R. Bruce Land (D, Vineland).[49] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[50] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[51]

Cumberland County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large in partisan elections to serve staggered three-year terms in office, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as Freeholder Director and another as Deputy Director.[52][53] As of 2014, Cumberland County's Freeholders (with committee liaison assignments, political party, residence and term-end dates listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Joseph Derella (Administration / Public Safety; D, Millville, term ends December 31, 2015),[54] Freeholder Deputy Director Douglas M. Long (NA; D, Upper Deerfield Township, 2015),[55] Darlene Barber (Education; D, 2016, Upper Deerfield Township),[56] Carol Musso (Community Services; D, Deerfield Township, 2014),[57] James Sauro (Agriculture; R, Vineland, 2014),[58] Thomas Sheppard (Health; R, Lawrence Township, 2016)[59] and Tony Surace (Public Works; D, Millville, 2014).[60][61][62][63] The county's constitutional officers are County Clerk Gloria Noto (Vineland, 2014),[64] Sheriff Robert A. Austino (Vineland, 2014)[65] and Surrogate Douglas M. Rainear (Bridgeton, 2018).[66]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,917 registered voters in Lawrence Township, of which 584 (30.5%) were registered as Democrats, 364 (19.0%) were registered as Republicans and 969 (50.5%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[67]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 52.6% of the vote (618 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 45.9% (539 votes), and other candidates with 1.4% (17 votes), among the 1,187 ballots cast by the township's 1,972 registered voters (13 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 60.2%.[68][69] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 48.8% of the vote (613 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama, who received 48.3% (607 votes), with 1,256 ballots cast among the township's 1,894 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.3%.[70] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 51.8% of the vote (586 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry, who received 45.7% (517 votes), with 1,131 ballots cast among the township's 1,683 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 67.2.[71]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 68.7% of the vote (450 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 30.1% (197 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (8 votes), among the 663 ballots cast by the township's 1,902 registered voters (8 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 34.9%.[72][73] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 46.9% of the vote (353 ballots cast), ahead of both Democrat Jon Corzine with 40.7% (306 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 7.3% (55 votes), with 752 ballots cast among the township's 1,865 registered voters, yielding a 40.3% turnout.[74]

Education[edit]

The Lawrence Township School District serves public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade at Myron L. Powell School. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its one school had an enrollment of 618 students and 43.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.4:1.[75]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students in Lawrence Township are assigned to one of two school districts based on the location of their residence. Students attend high school either in Bridgeton or Millville, based on sending/receiving relationships with the respective school districts, the Bridgeton Public Schools and the Millville Public Schools.[76] Students sent to Bridgeton attend Bridgeton High School.[77] Students sent to Millville join students from Commercial Township, Maurice River Township and Woodbine and attend Memorial High School for ninth grade and half of the tenth grade and Millville Senior High School for half of the tenth grade through the twelfth grade.[78][79]

Transportation[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 54.06 miles (87.00 km) of roadways, of which 26.30 miles (42.33 km) were maintained by the municipality and 27.76 miles (44.68 km) by Cumberland County.[80]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Lawrence Township include:

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Township Committee, Lawrence Township, Cumberland County. Accessed May 14, 2017. As of date accessed, Sheppard is list with an incorrect term-end year of 2016.
  4. ^ 2017 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 14, 2017.
  5. ^ Township Clerk, Lawrence Township, Cumberland County, NJ. Accessed June 30, 2016.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 19.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Lawrence, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Lawrence township, Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 1. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Lawrence township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014 - 2014 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Cedarville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Cedarville, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  15. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 23, 2012.
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  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 121. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  20. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 2, 2015.
  21. ^ New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control. New Jersey ABC list of dry towns (May 1, 2013)
  22. ^ Giordano, Rita. "More towns catching liquor-license buzz; Moorestown considers ending its dry spell", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 24, 2007. Accessed February 16, 2014.
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  25. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 14, 2017.
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  27. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Cumberland County Municipalities, 1810 - 2010, WestJersey.org. January 6, 2011. Accessed October 22, 2012.
  28. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  29. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed October 22, 2012.
  30. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed October 22, 2012.
  31. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  32. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Lawrence township, Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Lawrence township, Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Lawrence township, Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  35. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 7. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  36. ^ 2017 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Lawrence Township, Cumberland County. Accessed May 14, 2017.
  37. ^ 2017 Directory of Cumberland County, New Jersey, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed May 14, 2017.
  38. ^ General Election Results November 8, 2016, Official Results, Cumberland County, New Jersey, updated November 18, 2016. Accessed January 30, 2017.
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  40. ^ Cumberland County General - November 4, 2014 Official Results, Cumberland County, New Jersey, updated March 17, 2015. Accessed June 30, 2016.
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  45. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  46. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  47. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  48. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  49. ^ Legislative Roster 2016-2017 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 17, 2016.
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  51. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  52. ^ What is a County Freeholder?, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014. "Freeholders are elected at-large and serve three year staggered terms. Each January, the Board reorganizes and selects its leadership."
  53. ^ About Cumberland County Government, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014. "By law, Cumberland County is allowed 7 freeholders, who serve staggered, overlapping three year terms. Two are elected in two successive years, three in the third year, elected from the county at-large. A Director of the Board is selected by his colleagues for a one year term."
  54. ^ Joseph Derella, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  55. ^ Douglas Long, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  56. ^ Darlene Barber, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  57. ^ Carol Musso, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  58. ^ James R. Sauro, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  59. ^ Thomas Sheppard, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  60. ^ Tony Surace, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
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  63. ^ Marko, Deborah M.; and Kov, Daniel. "GOP keeps two seats on freeholder boardRainear re-elected as surrogate; Mercado ousted", The Daily Journal (New Jersey), November 6, 2013. Accessed July 28, 2014. "GOP candidate Tom Sheppard wins a three-year seat. His running mate, James Sauro, wins a one-year seat. The pair will be the only GOP representatives on the seven-member freeholder board. Darlene Barber, a Democrat in her first race, won the other three-year freeholder seat that was available.... In the surrogate race, incumbent Democrat Douglas Rainear defeated Republican newcomer Timothy Codispoti."
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  75. ^ District information for Lawrence Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016.
  76. ^ Lawrence Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey. Accessed December 8, 2014. "Students in Lawrence Township go on to finish their high school education at Millville High School or Bridgeton High School, depending on their location, under a regional partnership agreement."
  77. ^ Staff. "Bridgeton High School", South Jersey Magazine. Accessed December 8, 2014. "Bridgeton High School provides opportunities for students from Bridgeton, Lawrence Township and Downe Township in Cumberland County to become members of society who are thoughtful, informed, involved and committed to life-long learning."
  78. ^ Sending District Students, Millville Public Schools. Accessed December 8, 2014. "9TH – 12th grade students who attend Memorial and MSHS from Woodbine, Commercial Township, Lawrence Township, and Maurice River Township will need to establish their proof of residency with their district."
  79. ^ Jones, Jean. "Maurice River enlists state help in fighting Millville HS tuition increase", South Jersey Times, January 16, 2008. Accessed December 8, 2014. "He said Millville is unwilling to pass on its need for more funding to its own taxpayers so it is passing the increase on to the sending districts -- Commercial, Maurice River and Lawrence townships and Woodbine."
  80. ^ Cumberland County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  81. ^ Ephraim Bateman, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 21, 2007.
  82. ^ Staff. "Help solve a Cumberland County history mystery: Where is Civil War Medal of Honor recipient John Davis buried?", The News of Cumberland County, July 7, 2009. Accessed May 14, 2017. "With memories fresh in our minds of tributes to our brave men and women of the Armed Forces, a question has been posed by an anonymous reader about one of Cumberland County's three Medal of Honor recipients, John Davis.... Davis, a quarter gunner with the U.S. Navy, was born in Cedarville."
  83. ^ Brooks, John Nixon. "Extracts from the Journal of Surgeon Ebenezer Elmer of the New Jersey Continental Line, September 11-19, 1777", p. 103, in The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 35, No. 1 (1911), pp. 103-107. Accessed May 14, 2017. "Dr. Ebenezer Elmer, born in Cedarville, Cumberland. County, New Jersey, was a grandson of Rev. Daniel Elmer, who came from Connecticut in 1727."
  84. ^ Lurie, Maxine N.; and Mappen, Marc. "Elmer, Jonathan", p. 250, in Encyclopedia of New Jersey. Rutgers University Press, 2004. ISBN 9780813533254. Accessed May 14, 2017. "Jonathan Elmer was born in Cedarville. Cumberland County, the son of Daniel Elmer and Abigail Lawrence."
  85. ^ Benjamin Franklin Howell, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 29, 2007.
  86. ^ Staff. "Wilson, Samuel Alexander Kinnier" in Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences, p. 769. Academic Press, 2014. ISBN 9780123851581. Accessed December 27, 2016. "Wilson was born in Cedarville, New Jersey, USA, but his family moved to Edinburgh shortly after he was born."

External links[edit]