Lazy Lake, Florida

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Lazy Lake, Florida
Village
Village of Lazy Lake
Location of Lazy Lake in Broward County, Florida
Location of Lazy Lake in Broward County, Florida
Coordinates: 26°9′22″N 80°8′42″W / 26.15611°N 80.14500°W / 26.15611; -80.14500Coordinates: 26°9′22″N 80°8′42″W / 26.15611°N 80.14500°W / 26.15611; -80.14500
Country  United States of America
State  Florida
County Broward County, Florida Logo.svg Broward
Incorporated June 3, 1953[1]
Government
 • Type Mayor-Council
 • Mayor Caolinine White
 • Councilmembers John Boisseau, Sally Boisseau, Linda Catalano, Oliver Kamm, Evan Anthony
 • Village Manager Joe Fodera
 • Village Clerk Joe Fedora
 • Village Attorney Richard Coker
Area
 • Total 0.02 sq mi (0.06 km2)
 • Land 0.02 sq mi (0.06 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 3 ft (1 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 24
 • Density 1,032/sq mi (398.5/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 33305
Area code(s) 954, 754
FIPS code 12-39750[2]
GNIS feature ID 0285410[3]

Lazy Lake is a village in Broward County, Florida, United States. The population was 24 at the 2010 census.[4]

History[edit]

In 1946, a developer and contractor by the name of Hal Ratliff, began the process of building the community around an old rock quarry (which later was filled with water and became the village's artificial lake.) He had the help of architect Clinton Gamble, who designed the original homes, and financier and accountant Charles H. Lindfors, who initially bought the land. Ratliff's goal was to build a community that was low-key, with heavy forestry infrastructure, allowing neighbors to keep to themselves and have some anonymity. Lazy Lake received its name when a friend of Hal Ratliff remarked that the lake looked "so lazy and peaceful."[5][6]

It is the smallest incorporated municipality in Broward County by population and by area. This low population was because the town originally had been composed of single family homes in a small housing development, with a lake named Lazy Lake, (its namesake,) in the middle of the houses surrounding it. The village started off with 13 homes on 13 acres (the maximum allowed by the charter.) The three homes of the three main founders of the village were the first to be built on the property, which was originally platted for a subdivision.[5][6]

In 1995, residents agreed to place the entire village up for sale at $15 million, but nobody purchased it. It was on the market for two years, and Sue Carolyn Wise, their broker, even went on television news stations and shows like CNN and A Current Affair to help promote the sale. People such as OJ Simpson and a Kuwaiti prince were initially interested, but ultimately didn't buy the village. After the two years of trying to be sold, it came off the market, and the village decided not to have the broker's contract renewed.[6][7]

During 2008, a few residents on the village's north side wanted to disincorporate, secede and get annexed and incorporated into the city of Wilton Manors. The reason this small movement failed was because most residents on the south part of the village wanted to remain a village, which was due largely in part because the mayor and most councilmembers at that time lived on the south side.[7][8]

Geography[edit]

Lazy Lake is located at 26°09′22″N 80°08′42″W / 26.156112°N 80.145117°W / 26.156112; -80.145117.[9]

The village is a landlocked enclave surrounded entirely within the borders of the city of Wilton Manors.

Lazy Lane is the only road in the village. It is surrounded by NE 24 Street to the north, NE 21 Court to the south, NE 1 Avenue to the east, and North Andrews Avenue to the west.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.023 square miles (0.06 km2), all land.[4]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 49
1970 48 −2.0%
1980 31 −35.4%
1990 33 6.5%
2000 38 15.2%
2010 24 −36.8%
Est. 2014 25 [10] 4.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
Lazy Lake Demographics
2010 Census Lazy Lake Broward County Florida
Total population 24 1,748,066 18,801,310
Population, percent change, 2000 to 2010 -36.8% +7.7% +17.6%
Population density 1,032.1/sq mi 1,444.9/sq mi 350.6/sq mi
White or Caucasian (including White Hispanic) 91.7% 63.1% 75.0%
(Non-Hispanic White or Caucasian) 83.3% 43.5% 57.9%
Black or African-American 4.2% 26.7% 16.0%
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 8.3% 25.1% 22.5%
Asian 0.0% 3.2% 2.4%
Native American or Native Alaskan 4.2% 0.3% 0.4%
Pacific Islander or Native Hawaiian 0.0% 0.1% 0.1%
Two or more races (Multiracial) 0.0% 2.9% 2.5%
Some Other Race 0.0% 3.7% 3.6%

As of 2010, there were 15 households out of which 26.7% were vacant. In 2000, 41.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.7% were married couples living together, and 41.7% were non-families. 8.3% of all households were made up of individuals and none had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.17 and the average family size was 3.14.

In 2000, the village population was spread out with 18.4% under the age of 18, 18.4% from 18 to 24, 26.3% from 25 to 44, 31.6% from 45 to 64, and 5.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 245.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 342.9 males.

In 2000, the median income for a household in the village was $142,581, and the median income for a family was $41,667. Males had a median income of $31,875 versus $31,250 for females. The per capita income for the village was $33,423. There were no families and 15.4% of the population living below the poverty line, including nobody under 18, and none of those over 64 years old.

As of 2000, speakers of English as a first language made up 100% of the population. It was the only municipality in all of Broward County that had no other languages spoken as their mother tongue.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Broward-by-the-Numbers (pages 3-5)" (PDF). www.broward.org. Retrieved 2015-07-17. 
  2. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Lazy Lake village, Florida". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved October 24, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "Municipal Directory: Village of Lazy Lake". www.floridaleagueofcities.com. Retrieved 2015-07-17. 
  6. ^ a b c "Wilton Manors Historical Society Historic Notes, June 2008: Lazy Lake - Independent Village" (PDF). By Benjamin B. Little of the Wilton Manors Historical Society, June 2008. Retrieved 2015-07-17. 
  7. ^ a b "Little piece of paradise is one of Broward County's best-kept secrets: Lazy Lake shuns the spotlight, despite the fact most people don't even know where it is". By Susannah Bryan, Sun-Sentinel, January 16, 2012. Retrieved 2015-07-17. 
  8. ^ "Some Lazy Lake residents hope to secede". By Juan Ortega, Sun-Sentinel, March 26, 2008. Retrieved 2015-07-17. 
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  10. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  12. ^ "MLA Data Center Results of Lazy Lake, FL Demographics". Modern Language Association. Retrieved 2007-10-22.