Lead abatement

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Lead abatement is an activity to reduce levels of lead, particularly in the home environment, generally to permanently eliminate lead-based paint hazards, in order to reduce or eliminate incidents of lead poisoning.[1][2]

Lead abatement may be undertaken in response to orders by state or local government.[2] It requires specialized techniques that local construction contractors typically do not have.[2] It includes activities such as lead-based paint inspections, risk assessments and lead-based paint removal.[1]

In the United States, lead abatement activities are regulated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency.[3] Lead abatement companies are governed by the EPA and the EPA requires and individuals and firms that conduct lead-based paint activities, including abatement, to be licensed. The lead abatement company, its supervisors, and all of the workers have to take classes and receive a certificate of completion. State agencies work with the EPA to enforce state and Federal laws.[1]

Lead abatement is distinguished from Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) programs, which are typically performed at the option of the property owner for aesthetic or other reasons, or as an interim control to minimize lead hazards.[1] RPP programs are not designed to permanently eliminate lead-based paint hazards.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Lead Abatement vs. Lead RRP". US EPA: Lead. United States Environmental Protection Agency. December 28, 2015. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c "Evaluating and Eliminating Lead-Based Paint Hazards". US EPA: Lead. United States Environmental Protection Agency. October 13, 2015. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Lead-Based Paint Activities Professionals". US EPA: Lead. United States Environmental Protection Agency. October 25, 2015. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 

External links[edit]

  • "Lead". U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Retrieved January 21, 2016.