Leader of the New Zealand Labour Party

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Leader of the Labour Party
New Zealand Labour logo.svg
Jacinda Ardern, 2018.jpg
Incumbent
Rt Hon Jacinda Ardern

since 1 August 2017
Precursor Andrew Little
Inaugural holder Alfred Hindmarsh
Formation 7 July 1916
Deputy Kelvin Davis
Website Labour Party profile

The Leader of the Labour Party is the highest ranked politician within the Labour Party in New Zealand. The officeholder serves as the parliamentary leader and leading spokesperson of the party. Since 1 August 2017, the office has been held by Jacinda Ardern, who is the MP for Mount Albert.[1]

Kelvin Davis is the Deputy Leader of the Labour Party, elected on 1 August 2017.[1]

History[edit]

The post of Leader of the Labour Party was officially created upon the party's inception in 1916, though the title "Leader" was often substituted and/or complimented with the title "Chairman". In 1935, Michael Joseph Savage became the first ever Labour Prime Minister, following a landslide victory. In 1963, Arnold Nordmeyer became the first Leader of the Labour Party to have been born in New Zealand. Prior to this, three Leaders had been born in Australia and one each in England and Scotland. The most electorally successful Labour Leader to date is Helen Clark, who won three elections in 1999, 2002 and 2005. Clark is also the Labour Party's longest-serving leader, having served for 14 years, 346 days between 1993 and 2008.[2] Peter Fraser is the longest-serving Labour Prime Minister, serving 9 years, 261 days between 1940 and 1949.

Selection[edit]

A new leader is elected whenever a vacancy arises, whether due to resignation, incapacitation, or following a motion of no confidence by the parliamentary caucus.[3] A shortlist of candidates is nominated from within the caucus. When the position is contested, the Leader is elected in a vote split among the party's caucus, party members and party affiliates (unions) in a 40/40/20 split respectively.[4] Prior to 2013, the Leader was elected solely by the caucus (this practice remains for the Deputy Leadership). No later than three months following a general election, there must be a caucus vote to endorse the Leader; if the Leader fails to receive endorsement then an election is triggered.[3]

Role[edit]

When the Labour Party forms the Parliamentary Opposition, the Leader of the Party usually acts as the Leader of the Opposition, and chairs a Shadow Cabinet. Concordantly, when the party is in Government, as it currently is, the Leader generally becomes the Prime Minister of New Zealand.

Unique to Labour, the party's caucus possesses the right to elect MPs to Cabinet, rather than the Leader choosing them. The practice began following the 1940 leadership election.[5] Michael Joseph Savage was the only leader to solely appoint his own cabinet following the election victories in 1935 and 1938.

List of leaders[edit]

The following is a complete list of Labour Party leaders (including Acting Leaders):

Key:
  Labour   Reform   United   National
PM: Prime Minister
LO: Leader of the Opposition
†: Died in office

No. Leader
(Birth–Death)
Portrait Electorate Term Began Term Ended Time in Office Position Prime Minister
1 Alfred Hindmarsh
(1860–1918)
Alfred Hindmarsh.jpg Wellington South 7 July 1916 13 November 1918† 2 years, 4 months and 6 days Massey
2 Harry Holland
(1868–1933)
Harry Holland (1925).jpg Grey (1918–19)
Buller (1919-33)
27 August 1919 8 October 1933† 14 years, 1 month and 11 days
Bell
LO 1926–1928 Coates
Junior coalition partner
1928–1931
Ward
LO 1931–1933 Forbes
3 Michael Joseph Savage
(1872–1940)
Michael Joseph Savage Portrait.jpg Auckland West 12 October 1933 27 March 1940† 6 years, 5 months and 15 days LO 1933–1935
PM 1935–1940 Savage
4 Peter Fraser
(1884–1950)
Peter Fraser.jpg Wellington Central (1918–46)
Brooklyn (1946-50)
1 April 1940 12 December 1950† 10 years, 8 months and 11 days PM 1940–1949 Fraser
LO 1949–1950 Holland
5 Walter Nash
(1882–1968)
Walter Nash (ca 1940s).jpg Hutt 17 January 1951 31 March 1963 12 years, 2 months and 14 days LO 1951–1957
Holyoake
PM 1957–1960 Nash
LO 1960–1963 Holyoake
6 Arnold Nordmeyer
(1901–1989)
Arnold Nordmeyer (1950).jpg Island Bay 1 April 1963 16 December 1965 2 years, 8 months and 15 days LO 1963–1965
7 Norman Kirk
(1923–1974)
Norman Kirk Portrait.jpg Lyttelton (1957–69)
Sydenham (1969-74)
16 December 1965 31 August 1974† 8 years, 8 months and 15 days LO 1965–1972
Marshall
PM 1972–1974 Kirk
- Hugh Watt(note 1)
(1912–1980)
Hugh Watt.jpg Onehunga 31 August 1974 6 September 1974 7 days PM 1974 Watt
8 Bill Rowling
(1927–1995)
Bill Rowling, 1962.jpg Tasman 6 September 1974 3 February 1983 8 years, 4 months and 28 days PM 1974–1975 Rowling
LO 1975–1983 Muldoon
9 David Lange
(1942–2005)
David Lange (cropped).jpg Mangere 3 February 1983 8 August 1989 6 years, 6 months and 5 days LO 1983–1984
PM 1984–1989 Lange
10 Geoffrey Palmer
(1942–)
Geoffrey Palmer.jpg Christchurch Central 8 August 1989 4 September 1990 1 year and 27 days PM 1989–1990 Palmer
11 Mike Moore
(1949–)
Mike Moore.jpg Christchurch North 4 September 1990 1 December 1993 3 years, 2 months and 27 days PM 1990 Moore
LO 1990–1993 Bolger
12 Helen Clark
(1950–)
Helen Clark UNDP 2010.jpg Mount Albert 1 December 1993 19 November 2008 14 years, 11 months and 18 days LO 1993–1999
Shipley
PM 1999–2008 Clark
13 Phil Goff
(1953–)
Phil Goff at Maungaraki School.jpg Mount Roskill 19 November 2008 13 December 2011 3 years and 24 days LO 2008–2011 Key
14 David Shearer
(1957–)
David Shearer.jpg Mount Albert 13 December 2011 15 September 2013 1 year, 9 months and 2 days LO 2011–2013
15 David Cunliffe
(1963–)
David Cunliffe, 2008.jpg New Lynn 15 September 2013 30 September 2014 1 year and 15 days LO 2013–2014
- David Parker(note 1)
(1960–)
David Parker NZ.jpg List MP 30 September 2014 18 November 2014 1 month and 19 days LO 2014
16 Andrew Little
(1965–)
Andrew Little, 2017.jpg List MP 18 November 2014 1 August 2017 2 years, 8 months and 14 days LO 2014–2017
English
17 Jacinda Ardern
(1980–)
Jacinda Ardern, 2018.jpg Mount Albert 1 August 2017 Incumbent 1 year, 46 days LO 2017
PM 2017–present Ardern

note 1: Deputy leaders who assumed the role of party leader temporarily because of the death or resignation of the incumbent, serving until the election of a new leader.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Trevett, Claire (1 August 2017). "Jacinda Ardern elected as new Labour leader". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 1 August 2017. 
  2. ^ Audrey Young (12 February 2008). "Clark beats record of longest-serving Labour leader – probably". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 12 February 2008. 
  3. ^ a b "Constitution and Rules" (PDF). New Zealand Labour Party. 2016. p. 92. Retrieved 6 May 2018. 
  4. ^ "Date confirmed for new Labour leader". The New Zealand Herald. APN News & Media. 23 August 2013. Retrieved 25 August 2013. 
  5. ^ Beaglehole, Tim. "Fraser, Peter". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 11 December 2011.