Leah McLaren

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Leah McLaren (born November 7, 1975) is a Canadian author and newspaper columnist.

Her writing has been published in several newspapers including The Times, The Evening Standard, and The Sunday Telegraph,[citation needed] as well as in the weekly magazine The Spectator, for which she wrote a controversial and widely read cover story on the romantic failure of the modern English male.[1]

In 2008, the CBC shot Abroad, a television movie of the week, written and produced by McLaren and based on her experiences as a young Canadian newspaper reporter living and dating in London. It aired once, on March 14, 2010 and was being developed as a series; until CBC Television cancelled it before any other episodes were made.[2]

McLaren describes herself as a feminist.[3] She had a regular Saturday column in the Life section of The Globe and Mail, in which she talked about living as a single woman in modern-day Toronto. She has written a column in the Arts section. She also writes "The Leah Files", a monthly column in Flare, a fashion magazine. She has written for other publications including Toronto Life, McGill Daily, enRoute, and others.[citation needed]

Leah McLaren is currently Maclean's Magazine's London correspondent.[4]

In 2012, Leah McLearn tried to sell her own house in a real estate column Home of the Week feature. The piece was ruled a conflict of interest by the Globe’s Public Editor Sylvia Stead, although that was too late to stop the $600,000 home from selling above its listing price.[5][6]

Leah McLaren came under fire for a controversial column she wrote for The Globe and Mail on March 22, 2017 where she admits she once attempted to breastfeed the infant child of Conservative leadership candidate Michael Chong without his or his wife’s consent, and while she was not lactating.[7] The paper later removed the piece from its website. Five days after its publication Chong confirmed via Twitter that the incident occurred over ten years previously, describing it as "no doubt odd, but of no real consequence".[8] To make her story true, McLaren would have been at least 29. On March 30, 2017 the Toronto Star reported that McLaren was suspended for one week by The Globe and Mail.[9]

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