Lee Adams

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Lee Adams
BornLee Richard Adams
(1924-08-14) August 14, 1924 (age 96)
Mansfield, Ohio, U.S.
OccupationWriter, librettist
Period1955–present
Notable worksBye Bye Birdie
Golden Boy
It's a Bird... It's a Plane... It's Superman
Applause
Notable awards2 Tony Awards, 1 Emmy Award
SpouseKelly Wood Adams
Children2

Lee Richard Adams (born August 14, 1924) is an American lyricist best known for his musical theatre collaboration with Charles Strouse.

Biography[edit]

Born in Mansfield, Ohio, Adams is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Leopold Adams and is a graduate of Mansfield Senior High School.[1] He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Ohio State University and a Master's from Columbia University. While attending Ohio State University he was a brother of the Nu chapter of the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity. He worked as a journalist for newspaper and magazines. He met Charles Strouse in 1949 and they initially wrote for summer-time revues.[2]

Adams won Tony Awards in 1961 for Bye Bye Birdie, the first Broadway musical he wrote with Strouse, and in 1970 for Applause and was nominated for a Tony Award in 1965 for Golden Boy.[3] In addition, he wrote the lyrics for All American, It's a Bird...It's a Plane...It's Superman, Bring Back Birdie, and A Broadway Musical, and the book and lyrics for Ain't Broadway Grand.[3] Additionally, Strouse and Adams co-wrote "Those Were the Days", the opening theme to the TV situation comedy All in the Family. Adams was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1989.[4]

Adams and his wife, Dr. Kelly Wood Adams, have lived in Briarcliff Manor, New York since 2007. He has two daughters and three grandchildren.[5]

Non-musical writing[edit]

In addition to his work with lyrics, Adams "had a lifelong fascination with words," which led to his being an editor for the Sunday newspaper magazine supplement This Week and a member of the staff of Pageant magazine.[6]

Works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Lyricist Lee Adams to Write Show Biz Column". Ohio, Mansfield. News-Journal. February 23, 1975. p. 1. Retrieved November 2, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  2. ^ "Lee Adams" pbs.com, retrieved January 31, 2019
  3. ^ a b "Lee Adams Broadway" Playbill, retrieved January 31, 2019
  4. ^ "Lee Adams" songhall.org, retrieved January 31, 2019
  5. ^ Kramer, Peter D. (October 16, 2015). "Briarcliff's 'Birdie' connection, Lee Adams". The Journal News. Gannett Company. Retrieved April 25, 2016.
  6. ^ Bloom, Ken (2007). Routledge Guide to Broadway. New York City: Routledge. p. 247. ISBN 978-0-415-97380-9. Retrieved 30 November 2015.

External links[edit]