Lee Perry (politician)

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Lee Perry
Member of the Utah House of Representatives
from the 29th[1] district
Assumed office
January 1, 2013
Preceded by Janice Fisher
Member of the Utah House of Representatives
from the 2nd district
In office
January 1, 2011 – December 31, 2012
Preceded by Ben Ferry
Succeeded by David Lifferth
Personal details
Born (1966-08-10) August 10, 1966 (age 51)
Brigham City, Utah
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Residence Perry, Utah
Alma mater Columbia College
Profession Police officer
Website leeperryutah.com

Lee B. Perry[2] (born August 10, 1966 in Brigham City, Utah) is an American politician and a Republican member of the Utah House of Representatives representing District 29 since January 1, 2013.

Early life and education[edit]

Perry was born in Brigham City, Utah, and attended Columbia College, where he received his B.A. in criminal justice administration in 1999. He was also certified as police officer in 1990. He has worked for the Utah Highway Patrol/Department of Public Safety since 1998. He and his wife, Kathlyn, have four children.[3]

Political career[edit]

Perry was first elected on November 2, 2010.

During the 2016 general legislative session, he served on the Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environmental Quality Appropriations Subcommittee, as the committee chair of the House Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Committee, and on the House Government Operations Committee.[4]

Elections[edit]

  • 2014 Perry faced Democratic Party nominee Alan Yorgason in the general election, winning with 5,588 votes (77.82%) to Yorgason's 1,593 (22.18%).[5]
  • 2012 Redistricted to District 29, and with incumbent Democratic Representative Janice Fisher redistricted to District 30, Perry and incumbent Representative Brad Galvez, who had been redistricted from District 6, were opponents for the June 26, 2012 Republican primary, which Perry won with 2,387 votes (60.7%);[5] Perry won the November 6, 2012 general election with 11,525 votes (79.8%) against Democratic nominee Heidi Bitton.[6]
  • 2010 Perry challenged incumbent Republican Representative Ben Ferry and was chosen by the Republican convention for the November 2, 2010 general election; Perry won with 7,160 votes (80.2%) against Constitution Party candidate Becky Maddox.[7]

2016 sponsored legislation[edit]

Bill Number Bill Title Status
HB0020 Lead Acid Battery Disposal Sunset Reauthorization Governor Signed - 3/18/2016
HB0099 Military Retirement Income Tax Exemption House/ filed - 3/10/2016
HB0138S01 Consumer Electronic Device Recycling Report Amendments Governor Signed - 3/22/2016
HB0167S01 Utah Law Enforcement Memorial Special Group License Plate Governor Signed - 3/18/2016
HB0211 Agricultural Exemption Amendments Governor Signed - 3/17/2016
HB0257 Water Funding Revisions House/ filed - 3/10/2016
HB0427 Private Security Amendments House/ filed - 3/10/2016
HB0450 Avalanche Training and Prevention Amendments House/ filed - 3/10/2016
HJR020 Joint Resolution Approving Class V Landfill House/ to Lieutenant Governor - 3/16/2016

[8]

Perry passed five of the nine bills he introduced, giving him a 55.6% passage rate. He also floor sponsored six Senate bills during the 2016 legislative session.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Lee B. Perry (R)". Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah State Legislature. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Lee Perry's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Lee Perry". unknown: Project Vote Smart. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Committees". le.utah.gov. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 
  5. ^ a b "2014 General Canvass Reports". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  6. ^ "2012 General Canvass Report". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  7. ^ "2010 General Election Results". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b "2016 -- Legislation(House Of Representatives)". le.utah.gov. Retrieved 2016-04-01. 

External links[edit]