Legend3D

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Legend3D, Inc.
Private
IndustryFilm, television
FoundedAugust 2001
Headquarters,
United States
Key people
Aidan Foley, CEO
Jeff Shapiro, CFO
Barry Stagg, CMO
ProductsStereoscopic 3D conversion and visual effects, virtual reality
Websitelegend3d.com

Legend 3D, Inc. is a stereoscopic conversion, virtual reality, and 3D visual effects company.[1]

Founded in 2001, the company produces 3D conversion and visual effects work.

In November 2016, Legend 3D moved into its 27,000 square foot, state-of-the-art facility on the Columbia Square campus in Hollywood, CA.[2] In October 2017, the company announced it was expanding its presence with a 40,000 square foot facility in Pune, India.

In February 2018, Toronto Star reported that the Toronto division of Legend3D has downsized its work force to about 100 employees. The liberal government had previously announced that it will allocate provincial government fund for $3.1 million to the L.A firm to create 271 new jobs while retaining 280 positions in its Toronto office.[3] When the government announced the funds for Legend, the company also pledged to invest $27 million in the Toronto office. The Ontario government says its officials are now “working with Legend 3D to confirm that they are following the terms of our contract."[4]

As of March 2019, The Toronto office has been silently shuttered and most staff have been laid off.

Company history[edit]

Barry Sandrew, Ph.D., founded Legend Films in 2001, four years after leaving his position as staff neuroscientist at Harvard and Mass General Hospital and inventing the first all-digital technology and process for colorizing black. The company produced colorized product for Fox Home Entertainment, Universal Pictures, Paramount, Sony, Japan’s Tsuburaya, BBC and several other major global media and distribution companies. In 2010, following the release of Alice in Wonderland, he changed the name of Legend Films to Legend 3D, and colorization took on a low priority in order for the company to focus entirely on the stereoscopic conversion of feature films and commercials. In late 2014, the company expanded to create two additional lines of business: Legend VFX, providing visual effects, and Legend VR, offering pre- and post-production services for the creation of virtual reality experiences.

In September 2017, the company opened Legend India in Pune, which, today, hosts a creative team of nearly 500. In December 2017, the company opened Legend China in Luoyang, which, today, hosts over 100 members.

In March 2019, the company has laid off it's Toronto employees and closed the Toronto office.


Controversy[edit]

In February 2018, Toronto Star reported that the Toronto division of Legend3D has downsized its work force to about 100 employees. The liberal government had previously announced that it will allocate provincial government fund for $3.1 million to the L.A firm to create 271 new jobs while retaining 280 positions in its Toronto office.[5] When the government announced the funds for Legend, the company also pledged to invest $27 million in the Toronto office. The Ontario government says its officials are now “working with Legend 3D to confirm that they are following the terms of our contract."[6]

As of March 2019, The Toronto office has been silently shuttered and most staff have been laid off.

Notable 3D conversion releases[edit]

Films[edit]

Commercials[edit]

In 2008, Legend converted a commercial for Skittles candy for the M&M/Mars Company

Special events[edit]

Legend performed 3D conversion of large-screen video material for the This Is It concerts.


References[edit]

  1. ^ Xconomy.com
  2. ^ "Virtual reality company signs 27K sf lease at Kilroy's Columbia Square campus in Hollywood". The Real Deal Los Angeles. 2016-07-13. Retrieved 2017-03-15.
  3. ^ "Growing Ontario's Digital Media Sector". news.ontario.ca. Retrieved 2018-02-06.
  4. ^ Rushowy, Kristin (2018-02-01). "Digital media company lays off workers after getting provincial funding". The Toronto Star. ISSN 0319-0781. Retrieved 2018-02-06.
  5. ^ "Growing Ontario's Digital Media Sector". news.ontario.ca. Retrieved 2018-02-06.
  6. ^ Rushowy, Kristin (2018-02-01). "Digital media company lays off workers after getting provincial funding". The Toronto Star. ISSN 0319-0781. Retrieved 2018-02-06.

External links[edit]