Legislative district of Mountain Province

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The Legislative district of Mountain Province is the representation of Mountain Province in the various national legislatures of the Philippines. The province is currently represented in the lower house of the Congress of the Philippines through its lone congressional district.

The present-day provinces of Apayao, Benguet, Ifugao and Kalinga, as well as the independent city of Baguio, formed part of the old (pre-division) Mountain Province's representation until 1969. Since 1969, the representation of Mountain Province has been reduced to a lone district, confined only to the limits of the former sub-province of Bontoc.

History[edit]

Initially being excluded from representation in the lower house of the Philippine Legislature in 1907, the then-non-Christian-majority areas of the Philippines — which included the undivided Mountain Province — were finally extended legislative representation with the passage of the Philippine Autonomy Act in 1916 by the United States Congress. The Revised Administrative Code (Act No. 2711) enacted on 10 March 1917 further elaborated on the manner by which these areas would be represented.[1] The non-Christian areas were to be collectively represented in the upper house's 12th senatorial district by two senators, both appointed by the Governor-General.[1] Three assembly members, also appointed by the Governor-General, were to represent the Mountain Province and the chartered city of Baguio in the lower house as a single at-large district. The appointment of these members of the Legislature did not require the consent of the upper house; the appointive legislators were also not necessarily required to be residents of the areas they represented.[2] For example, Assemblyman Pedro Aunario, a resident of Manila,[3] and Senator Lope K. Santos, a resident of Rizal, were among the representatives of the Mountain Province.

Despite several of the Mountain Province's municipalities and municipal districts being annexed to the neighboring provinces of Ilocos Sur (in 1920), La Union (in 1920) and Cagayan (in 1922 and 1928), voters in these areas were still represented by the three assembly members of the Mountain Province, and two senators of the twelfth senatorial district. Only in 1935 were these voters extended the right to participate in electing representatives of their respective new provinces, when Act No. 4203 assigned them to specific districts for the purposes of electing members of the unicameral National Assembly of the Philippines.[4]

Act No. 4203, enacted by the Philippine Legislature on 23 July 1935, also abolished the senatorial district system and the Mountain Province's lower house representation was made elective through popular vote; the law divided the province into three districts with definite territorial composition.[4] The only sub-province which belonged to more than one district was Bontoc: the eastern portion consisting of the present-day municipalities of Barlig, Bontoc, Paracelis, Natonin, Sabangan, Sadanga and Sagada were represented as part of the undivided province's first district, while the western portion which formerly belonged to the now-defunct Lepanto sub-province (Bauko, Besao and Tadian) were represented as part of the third district.

In the disruption caused by the Second World War, the Mountain Province sent two delegates to the National Assembly of the Japanese-sponsored Second Philippine Republic: one was the provincial governor (an ex officio member), while the other was elected through a provincial assembly of KALIBAPI members during the Japanese occupation of the Philippines. Baguio, being a chartered city, was represented separately in this short-lived legislative body. Upon the restoration of the Philippine Commonwealth in 1945, district representation was restored to the pre-war setup: the sub-province of Bontoc remained split between the first and third districts, and the independent city of Baguio remained part of the second district.

The enactment of Republic Act No. 4695 on 18 June 1966 made the sub-province of Bontoc into a full-fledged province that retained the name "Mountain Province."[5] The new (post-division) Mountain Province began electing its lone representative starting in the next general election.

Mountain Province was represented as part of Region I from 1978 to 1984, and returned one representative, elected at-large, to the Regular Batasang Pambansa in 1984. It retained its lone congressional district under the new Constitution[6] which was proclaimed on 11 February 1987, and elected its member to the restored House of Representatives starting that same year.

Lone District[edit]

  • Population (2010): 154,187
Period Representative[7]
7th Congress
1969–1972
Alfredo G. Lamen
8th Congress
1987–1992
Victor S. Dominguez
9th Congress
1992–1995
10th Congress
1995–1998
11th Congress
1998–2001
Josephine D. Dominguez
12th Congress
2001–2004
Roy S. Pilando
13th Congress
2004–2007
Victor S. Dominguez1
14th Congress
2007–2010
vacant
15th Congress
2010–2013
Maximo B. Dalog
16th Congress
2013–2016
17th Congress
2016–2019
^1 Died on 8 February 2008; seat remained vacant until the end of the 13th Congress.[7]

1st District (defunct)[edit]

Period Representative[7]
1st National Assembly
1935–1938
Saturnino Moldero
2nd National Assembly
1938–1941
1st Commonwealth Congress
1941–1946
George K. Tait
1st Congress
1946–1949
2nd Congress
1949–1953
Antonio Canao
3rd Congress
1953–1957
Juan Bondad
4th Congress
1957–1961
Juan M. Duyan
5th Congress
1961–1965
Alfredo G. Lamen1
Juan M. Duyan2
6th Congress
1965–1969
vacant
^1 Lost electoral protest lodged by Juan M. Duyan, 1964.[7]
^2 Won electoral protest against Alfredo G. Lamen and took oath of office on 27 January 1964 to serve for the remainder of the 5th Congress. Elected to the 6th Congress in the 1965 elections, but later elected governor of Kalinga-Apayao on 14 November 1967; seat remained vacant until the end of the 6th Congress.[7]

2nd District (defunct)[edit]

Period Representative[7]
1st National Assembly
1935–1938
Felipe E. Jose
2nd National Assembly
1938–1941
Ramon P. Mitra
1st Commonwealth Congress
1941–1946
1st Congress
1946–1949
Jose Mencio
2nd Congress
1949–1953
Dennis Molintas2
Ramon P. Mitra3
3rd Congress
1953–1957
4th Congress
1957–1961
5th Congress
1961–1965
6th Congress
1965–1969
Andres A. Cosalan
^1 Independent from the province and does not vote for provincial officials since 1909 by virtue of Act No. 1964. Only voted as part of Mountain Province for congressional representation.
^2 Lost electoral protest lodged by Ramon P. Mitra, 12 October 1951.[7]
^3 Won electoral protest against Dennis Molintas, 12 October 1951; took oath of office on 28 January 1952 to serve for the remainder of the 2nd Congress.[7]

3rd District (defunct)[edit]

Period Representative[7]
1st National Assembly
1935–1938
George K. Tait
2nd National Assembly
1938–1941
Miguel Gumangan
1st Commonwealth Congress
1941–1946
Gregorio Marrero
1st Congress
1946–1949
Gabriel Dunuan
2nd Congress
1949–1953
3rd Congress
1953–1957
Luis Hora
4th Congress
1957–1961
5th Congress
1961–1965
6th Congress
1965–1969

At-Large (defunct)[edit]

1917–1935[edit]

Period Representatives[7]
4th Philippine Legislature
1916–1919a
Rafael Bulayungan
Juan Cariño
Valentin Manglapus
5th Philippine Legislature
1919–1922
Pedro Aunario
6th Philippine Legislature
1922–1925
Joaquin Codamon
Miguel Cornejo2
Henry A. Kamora
Juan Cailles3
7th Philippine Legislature
1925–1928
Saturnino Moldero
8th Philippine Legislature
1928–1931
Clemente Irving
9th Philippine Legislature
1931–1934
Hilary P. Clapp
Juan Gaerlan
Henry A. Kamora
10th Philippine Legislature
1934–1935
Emiliano P. Aguirre
Felix P. Diaz
Rodolfo Hidalgo
^a Representatives only assumed office in 1917 after appointment by the Governor-General, pursuant to the provisions of Act No. 2711.
^2 Removed from office by Governor-General on 6 October 1925 after being convicted and sentenced to imprisonment for assaulting an American.[9]
^3 Appointed by the Governor-General in October 1925 to fill the vacated seat of Miguel Cornejo.[7]

1943–1944[edit]

Period Representatives[7]
National Assembly
1943–1944
Florencio Bagwan[10]
Hilary P. Clapp (ex officio)[10]

1984–1986[edit]

Period Representative[7]
Regular Batasang Pambansa
1984–1986
Victor S. Dominguez

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Philippine Legislature (1917). Revised Administrative Code of the Philippine Islands of 1917 (Act No. 2711) (Digitized Revised Administrative Code of the Philippine Islands of 1917 from the Presidential Museum and Library Collection, uploaded on 15 February 2016). Bureau of Printing. Retrieved 4 February 2017. 
  2. ^ Cain, Andrew W. (1917). Philippine Government. Philippine Education Company, Inc. p. 57. 
  3. ^ Cain, Andrew W. (1917). Philippine Government. Philippine Education Company, Inc. p. 157. 
  4. ^ a b Philippine Legislature (1937). Public Laws Enacted by the Philippine Legislature, Acts No. 4203 to 4275. Bureau of Printing Office. p. 5. 
  5. ^ Congress of the Philippines (18 June 1966). "Republic Act No. 4695 - An Act Creating the Provinces of Benguet, Mountain Province, Ifugao and Kalinga-Apayao". Chan Robles Law Library. Retrieved 4 February 2017. 
  6. ^ 1986 Constitutional Commission (2 February 1987). "1987 Constitution of the Philippines - Apportionment Ordinance". Retrieved 13 June 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Congressional Library Bureau. "Roster of Philippine Legislators". Republic of the Philippines, House of Representatives. Retrieved 7 February 2017. 
  8. ^ "An Act Creating the Municipal District of Potia in the Mountain Province". LawPH.com. Retrieved 2011-04-11. 
  9. ^ "News of the World". Philippine Education Magazine. Vol. 22. Manila: Philippine Education Co. 1925. p. 321. 
  10. ^ a b Official program of the inauguration of the Republic of the Philippines and the induction into office of His Excellency Jose P. Laurel. Bureau of Printing. 1943.