Legislative districts of Maguindanao

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The Legislative districts of Maguindanao are the representations of the province of Maguindanao in the various national legislatures of the Philippines. The province is currently represented in the lower house of the Congress of the Philippines through its first and second congressional districts.

Cotabato City, an independent component city, only votes as part of the first congressional district of Maguindanao for the purposes of electing congressional representatives.

History[edit]

Prior to gaining separate representation, areas now under the jurisdiction of Maguindanao were represented under the Department of Mindanao and Sulu (1917–1935) and Cotabato (1935–1972).

The enactment of Presidential Decree No. 341 on 22 November 1973 created the Province of Maguindanao out of Cotabato's Maguindanao-majority municipalities.[1] The new province was represented in the Interim Batasang Pambansa as part of Region XII from 1978 to 1984.

Maguindanao (including Cotabato City) first gained separate representation in 1984, when it returned two representatives, elected at large, to the Regular Batasang Pambansa.

Under the new Constitution which was proclaimed on 11 February 1987, the province, including Cotabato City, was reapportioned into two congressional districts;[2] each elected its member to the restored House of Representatives starting that same year.

The province of Shariff Kabunsuan, established with the passage of Muslim Mindanao Autonomy Act No. 201[3] and its subsequent approval by plebiscite, was created out of Maguindanao's western municipalities in 2006. Per Section 5 of MMA Act No. 201, Cotabato City was grouped with Shariff Kabunsuan for the purpose of electing a congressional representative.[3] It was this specific provision that became the subject of the Supreme Court case that ultimately voided MMA Act No. 201 for being unconstitutional, and leading to the disestablishment of the Shariff Kabunsuan in 2008 and the return of its territory to Maguindanao. In the brief period of Shariff Kabunsuan's existence the First District of Maguindanao—Cotabato City was known as the Lone District of Shariff Kabunsuan—Cotabato City, while the Second District was known as the Lone District of Maguindanao.

1st District[edit]

Period Representative[5]
8th Congress
1987–1992
Michael O. Mastura
9th Congress
1992–1995
10th Congress
1995–1998
Didagen P. Dilangalen2
11th Congress
1998–2001
12th Congress
2001–2004
13th Congress
2004–2007
Bai Sendig G. Dilangalen
14th Congress
2007–2010
Didagen P. Dilangalen3
15th Congress
2010–2013
Bai Sandra A. Sema
16th Congress
2013–2016
17th Congress
2016–2019
^1 Independent from the province and does not vote for provincial officials. Only votes with Maguindanao for representation in the various national legislatures.
^2 Only took oath on 26 March 1996,[5] following the resolution of legal battles surrounding the 1995 election results contested by Michael Mastura.[6]
^3 Elected as representative of the district briefly designated as the Lone District of Shariff Kabunsuan—Cotabato City in 2007.

2nd District[edit]

Period Representative[5]
8th Congress
1987–1992
Guimid P. Matalam
9th Congress
1992–1995
Simeon A. Datumanong1
10th Congress
1995–1998
11th Congress
1998–2001
vacant
12th Congress
2001–2004
Guimid P. Matalam
13th Congress
2004–2007
Simeon A. Datumanong2
14th Congress
2007–2010
15th Congress
2010–2013
16th Congress
2013–2016
Datu Zajid G. Mangudadatu
17th Congress
2016–2019
^1 Appointed Secretary of Public Works and Highways in 2001; seat remained vacant until the end of the 11th Congress.
^2 Elected as representative of the district briefly designated as Lone District of Maguindanao in 2007.

At Large (defunct)[edit]

Period Representatives[5]
Regular Batasang Pambansa
1984–1986
Simeon A. Datumanong
Salipada K. Pendatun1
^1 Died on 27 January 1985; seat remained vacant until the abolition of the Regular Batasang Pambansa in 1986.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marcos, Ferdinand E. (22 November 1973). "Presidential Decree No. 341 - Creating the Provinces of North Cotabato, Maguindanao and Sultan Kudarat". Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  2. ^ 1986 Constitutional Commission (2 February 1987). "1987 Constitution of the Philippines - Apportionment Ordinance". Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  3. ^ a b Regional Legislative Assembly - Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (7 September 2006). "Muslim Mindanao Autonomy Act No. 201 - An Act Creating the Province of Shariff Kabunsuan, Providing Funds Therefor, and for Other Purposes" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 February 2017. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Population of Population of Legislative Districts by Region, Province, and Selected Highly Urbanized/Component City: 2015". Philippine Statistics Authority. 2015. Retrieved 18 November 2017.
  5. ^ a b c d e Congressional Library Bureau. "Roster of Philippine Legislators". Republic of the Philippines, House of Representatives. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  6. ^ Supreme Court of the Philippines (29 January 1998). "G.R. No. 124521 — MICHAEL O. MASTURA, petitioner, vs. COMMISSION ON ELECTIONS (Second Division), THE NEW MUNICIPAL BOARD OF CANVASSERS OF MATANOG, MAGUINDANAO, THE NEW PROVINCIAL BOARD OF CANVASSERS OF MAGUINDANAO and DIDAGEN P. DILANGALEN, respondents". The LawPhil Project. Retrieved 22 November 2017.