Lego Rock Raiders (video game)

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Lego Rock Raiders
Lego Rock Raiders Coverart.png
Developer(s)Data Design Interactive
Publisher(s)Lego Media
Director(s)Eamonn Barr
Producer(s)Stewart Green
Designer(s)
  • Karl White
  • David Allen
Programmer(s)
  • Tony Stoddart
  • Rob Wilson
Artist(s)Rob Dorney
Composer(s)
  • John Saull
  • Jon Harrison
  • Joseph Harper
Platform(s)Microsoft Windows, PlayStation
ReleaseWindows
  • EU: 3 November 1999
  • NA: 18 November 1999[1]
PlayStation
Genre(s)Real-time strategy (PC), action (PS)
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer (PS only)

Lego Rock Raiders is a video game developed by Data Design Interactive and published by Lego Media for Microsoft Windows and PlayStation. It is based on the Lego theme of the same name. The Windows version was released in 1999, while a differently built game for PlayStation was released in 2000.

Gameplay[edit]

Windows version[edit]

The Windows version is a real-time strategy game similar to Dungeon Keeper, and was the first video game for the Rock Raiders theme. The game opens with optional training missions and one actual mission unlocked. Most missions require the player to collect a certain amount of Energy Crystals, the required amount starts low but gradually gets higher in later missions. Some missions require the player to locate Rock Raiders that have been trapped in landslides, or to find certain pieces of equipment and bring it back to their base. One of the game's features is the Priority Menu. With this menu, the player can set what order Rock Raiders carry out their tasks. For example, the player can set whether Rock Raiders should collect Energy Crystals or Lego Ore first.

At the end of each mission, Chief would evaluate the player's work, examining various aspects of the mission. With all these taken into consideration, Chief would give a mission rating percentage.

There are twenty-five missions total, each of them is in either a rock, lava/volcanic or ice cavern environment. It is not necessary to complete every mission with 100%, or even complete all the missions, to complete the campaign, however, the player will unlock a "better" ending cutscene by completing the campaign in full.

PlayStation version[edit]

Unlike the Windows version, the PlayStation version is an action and strategy game, in which the player controls a character instead of just commanding a squad. While the former was centered on constructing a base and mining, the latter centers on exploring.

Most missions require the player to collect a certain amount of Energy Crystals, while some missions require the player to rescue Rock Raiders that have been trapped by landslides. There are eighteen campaign missions, and six multiplayer missions, all completely different between the NTSC and PAL versions of the game. The PAL version also including three bonus missions that are accessible after the campaign is completely finished, and twelve additional multiplayer missions reusing levels from the main campaign. Rather than a percentage, at the end of each mission you receive either a bronze medal (minimum required objectives complete), a silver medal (most objectives complete), or a gold medal (all objectives complete in the required time).

Reception[edit]

The game received mixed reviews on both platforms according to the review aggregation website GameRankings.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McClendon, Bill (18 November 1999). "And Then There Were Three". Gamecenter. CNET. Archived from the original on 26 February 2000. Retrieved 12 March 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ Zdyrko, Dave (4 August 2000). "Lego Rock Raiders (PS; Preview)". IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved 12 March 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b "LEGO Rock Raiders for PC". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 27 May 2019. Retrieved 12 March 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ a b "LEGO Rock Raiders for PlayStation". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 1 May 2019. Retrieved 12 March 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ Green, Earl. "LEGO Rock Raiders (PS) - Review". AllGame. All Media Network. Archived from the original on 17 November 2014. Retrieved 12 March 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Finn, David (29 December 1999). "Lego Rock Raiders". Computer Games Strategy Plus. Strategy Plus, Inc. Archived from the original on 9 July 2003. Retrieved 12 March 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Ashe, Suzanne (30 August 2000). "LEGO Rock Raiders (PS)". The Electric Playground. Greedy Productions. Archived from the original on 14 November 2003. Retrieved 12 March 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ "Lego Rock Raiders (PS)". Game Informer. No. 90. FuncoLand. October 2000.
  9. ^ Park, Andrew Seyoon (28 January 2000). "Lego Rock Raiders Review (PC)". GameSpot. CBS Interactive.
  10. ^ Satterfield, Shane (25 August 2000). "LEGO Rock Raiders Review (PS)". GameSpot. CBS Interactive.
  11. ^ Lopez, Vincent (12 January 2000). "LEGO Rock Raiders (PC)". IGN. Ziff Davis.
  12. ^ Cleveland, Adam (16 August 2000). "Lego Rock Raiders (PS)". IGN. Ziff Davis.
  13. ^ "Lego Rock Raiders". Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine. No. 37. Ziff Davis. October 2000.
  14. ^ "Lego Rock Raiders". PC Gamer UK. Future Publishing. 2000.
  15. ^ "Lego Rock Raiders". PC Games (in German). Computec. February 2000.
  16. ^ Lyon, James (April 2000). "Lego Rock Raiders". PC Zone. No. 88. Dennis Publishing. p. 91. Retrieved 12 March 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links[edit]