Leica M mount

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Leica M mount
Leica M3 & Elmar 50mm f-2.8 (5503366942).jpg
Leica M3 and M Mount 50mm lens
TypeBayonet
External diameter44 mm
Tabs4
Flange27.8 mm
ConnectorsFocal lens indicator for frame selection in the viewfinder

The Leica M mount is a camera lens mount introduced in 1954 with the Leica M3, and a range of lenses. It has been used on all the Leica M-series cameras and certain accessories (e.g. Visoflex reflex viewing attachment) up to the current film Leica M-A and digital Leica M10 cameras.

This lens mount has also been used by Epson, Ricoh, Minolta, Konica, Cosina Voigtländer, Rollei, Carl Zeiss AG and Rollei Fototechnic on some of their cameras.[1]

Overview[edit]

The Leica M mount was introduced in 1954 at that year's Photokina show, with the Leica M3 as its first camera. The 'M' stands for Messsucher or rangefinder in German. This new camera abandoned the M39 lens mount in favour of a new bayonet mount. The bayonet mount allowed lenses to be changed more quickly and made the fitting more secure. Other innovations introduced by the M3 included a single window for the viewfinder (for composition) and the rangefinder (for focussing). With a double-stroke film advance lever (later models have a single-stroke lever). The M3 was a success and over 220,000 units were sold, by the time production ended in 1966. It remains the best-selling M mount camera ever made. The M3 uses 135 film (or 35 mm film), with the canister being loaded behind a detachable bottom plate. The M3 was followed by many other M mount cameras, released over 40 years, with many of the basic concepts remaining in these designs. With the introduction of the Through-the-lens metering (TTL) in the Leica M5 and the digital Leica M8 being the most notable innovations since then.[2]

The lenses for the M mount were also introduced in 1954 and were based on the earlier M39 thread mount. Almost all M mount lens are Prime lens. These lenses are divided by Leica based on their maximum aperture number (also known as f-number). They are distinguished by their names:[2]

Name f-number
Noctilux f/0.95 or f/1.0 or f/1.2 or f/1.25
Summilux f/1.4
Summicron f/2
Summarit f/2.5
Elmarit f/2.8
Elmar, Super Elmar f/2.8 or f/3.4 or f/3.8 or f/4
Summaron f/3.5 or f/5.6
Hektor f/4.5

M Mount camera bodies[edit]

Film cameras[edit]

Image Name Year Exposure Notes
Leica M3 & Elmar 50mm f-2.8 (5503366928).jpg
Leica M3 1954 – 1966 Manual  • First bayonet M mount camera

 • 220,000 produced in Germany

Leica M2 vir.jpg
Leica M2 1957 – 1968 Manual  • Around 82,000 produced in Germany

 • Around 1,500 produced in Canada

Leica M1.jpg
Leica M1 1959 – 1964 Manual  • Around 9,431 produced
Leica M4-P.JPG
Leica M4 1964 – 1975 Manual  • Redesigned film loading and film winding

 • Introduction of the "red dot"

 • Versions: Leica MDa, Leica M4-2, Leica M4-P

Leica M5.jpg
Leica M5 1971 – 1975 Manual
TTL metering
 • Redesigned body

 • First M mount with electronic Through-the-lens metering (TTL)

Leica M6 TTL front.jpg
Leica M6 1984 – 2002 Manual
TTL metering
 • Basically the M4 with TTL metering

 • Leica M6 (1984 – 1998)

 • Leica M6 TTL (1998 – 2002): Better viewfinder and electronic flash capability

Leica M7 IMG 1990.jpg
Leica M7 2002 – 2018 Manual
TTL metering
Aperture priority semi-automatic
 • Electronically controlled, requires battery to operate fully

 • Electronic shutter control and semi-automatic mode

Leica MP IMG 2672.jpg
Leica MP 2003 – present Manual
TTL metering
 • Vintage design

 • Removal of the "red dot"

Leica M-A[3] 2014 – present Manual  • Rerelease of the M3 design

 • Manual exposure only

Digital cameras[edit]

Professional[edit]

Image Name Year Sensor Notes
Leica-m8 hg.JPG
Leica M8[4] 2006 – 2009 10 megapixels with CCD sensor  • First digital M mount camera

 • 3936 x 2630 Max resolution

 • 2.5″ inch screen

Leica M9.jpg
Leica M9[5] 2009 – 2012 18 megapixels with CCD sensor  • 5212 x 3472 Max resolution

 • 2.5″ inch screen

Leica M9-P cropped.jpg
Leica M9-P[6] 2011 – 2012 18 megapixels with CCD sensor  • Removal of the "red dot", otherwise same as the Leica M9

 • 5212 x 3472 Max resolution

 • 2.5″ inch screen with sapphire crystal LCD glass

Leica M-240-P4140434-white.jpg
Leica M (Typ 240)[7] 2012 – 2017 24 megapixels with CMOS sensor  • 5952 x 3976 Max resolution

 • 3″ inch screen

 • Capable of capturing Full HD 1080p video

Leica M-P (Typ 240) with Summicron-M 1-2-35 mm ASPH L1008131.jpg
Leica M-P (Typ 240)[8] 2014 – 2017 24 megapixels with CMOS sensor  • Removal of the "red dot", otherwise same as the Leica M (Typ 240)

 • 5952 x 3976 Max resolution

 • 3″ inch screen with sapphire crystal LCD glass

 • Capable of capturing Full HD 1080p video

Leica M10 black.jpg
Leica M10[9] 2017 – present 24 megapixels with CMOS sensor  • 5952 x 3992 Max resolution

 • 3″ inch screen

 • Wi-Fi capability

Leica M10-P (Typ 3656) schwarz.jpg
Leica M10-P[10] 2018 – present 24 megapixels with CMOS sensor  • Removal of the "red dot", otherwise same as the Leica M10

 • 5952 x 3992

 • 3″ inch screen

 • Wi-Fi capability

Entry[edit]

Image Name Year Sensor Notes
Leica M-E Typ 220.jpg
Leica M-E (Typ 220)[11] 2012 – 2015 18 megapixels with CCD sensor  • 5212 x 3472 Max resolution

 • 2.5″ inch screen

Leica M (Typ 262)[12] 2015 – 2019 24 megapixels with CMOS sensor  • 5952 x 3976 Max resolution

 • 3″ inch screen

Leica M-E (Typ 240)[13] 2019 – present 24 megapixels with CMOS sensor  • 5976 x 3992 Max resolution

 • 3″ inch screen

 • Capable of capturing Full HD 1080 video

Monochrom[edit]

Image Name Year Sensor Notes
Leica M Monochrom.jpeg
Leica M Monochrom[14] 2012 – 2015 18 megapixels with CCD sensor  • 5212 x 3472 Max resolution

 • 2.5″ inch screen

 • Black-and-white version of the M9

Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246)[15] 2015 – 2020 24 megapixels with CMOS sensor  • 5952 x 3968 Max resolution

 • 3″ inch screen with sapphire crystal LCD glass

 • Black-and-white version of the M (Typ 240)

 • Capable of capturing Full HD 1080 video

Leica M10 Monochrom [16] 2020 – present 41 megapixels with CMOS sensor  • 7864 x 5200 Max resolution

 • 3" inch screen TFT LCD monitor

 • Black-and-white version of the M10

 • Dedicated ISO dial with ISO 160 to ISO 100.000

No display[edit]

Image Name Year Sensor Notes
Leica M-D.jpg
Leica M-D (Typ 262)[17] 2016 – 2018 24 megapixels with CMOS sensor  • No Rear LCD Screen

 • The only control on the body is via the shutter speed and ISO dials

Leica M10-D (Typ 9217).jpg
Leica M10-D[18] 2018 – present 24 megapixels with CMOS sensor  • 7840 x 5184 Max resolution

 • No Rear LCD Screen

Increased resolution[edit]

Image Name Year Sensor Notes
Leica M10-R[19] 2020 – present 40 megapixels with CMOS sensor  • 3" inch screen TFT LCD monitor

 • The only control on the body is via the shutter speed and ISO dials

Other manufacturers[edit]

M mount lenses[edit]

Summary of Leica M lenses
Speed Name 21mm 24mm 28mm 35mm 50mm 75mm 90mm 135mm
f/5.6 Summaron Green tickY
f/4.0
Super-Angulon Green tickY
Macro Elmar Green tickY
Elmar Green tickY Green tickY
Tele-Elmar Green tickY
Tri-Elmar ASPH 16-18-21mm
28-35-50mm
f/3.8 Elmar ASPH. Green tickY
f/3.5 Summaron Green tickY
f/3.4 Super-Elmar ASPH. Green tickY
Apo-Telyt Green tickY
f/2.8 Elmar Green tickY
Elmarit Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Elmarit ASPH. Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Tele-Elmarit Green tickY
f/2.5 Summarit Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
f/2 Summicron Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Summicron ASPH. Green tickY Green tickY
APO Summicron Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
f/1.4 Summilux Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
Summilux ASPH. Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
f/1.25 Noctilux ASPH. Green tickY
f/1.2 Noctilux Green tickY
f/1 Noctilux Green tickY
f/0.95 Noctilux ASPH. Green tickY

Other manufacturers[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Leica M Mount in the Leica Glossary". apotelyt.com. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  2. ^ a b Taylor, David (2014). Leica M Typ 240 Expanded Guide. United Kingdom: Ammonite Press. ISBN 1781450390.
  3. ^ "Leica M-A Details". us.leica-camera.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  4. ^ "Leica M8: Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  5. ^ "Leica M9: Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  6. ^ "Leica M9-P: Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  7. ^ "Leica M Typ 240: Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  8. ^ "Leica M-P (Typ 240): Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  9. ^ "Leica M10: Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  10. ^ "Leica M10-P: Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  11. ^ "Leica M-E Typ 220: Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  12. ^ "Leica M (Typ 262): Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  13. ^ "Leica M-E (Typ 240): Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  14. ^ "Leica M-Monochrom: Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  15. ^ "Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246): Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  16. ^ "Leica M10 Monochrom: Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2020-01-22.
  17. ^ "Leica M-D (Typ 262) Review". Imaging Resource. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  18. ^ "Leica M10-D: Digital Photography Review". www.dpreview.com. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  19. ^ "Details // Leica M10-R // Leica M-System // Photography - Leica Camera AG". uk.leica-camera.com. Retrieved 2020-07-20.

External links[edit]