Leisure Suit Larry 5: Passionate Patti Does a Little Undercover Work

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Leisure Suit Larry 5: Passionate Patti Does a Little Undercover Work
Leisure Suit Larry V.png
Amiga cover art for Leisure Suit Larry 5: Passionate Patti Does a Little Undercover Work
Developer(s)Sierra On-Line
Publisher(s)Sierra On-Line
Director(s)Al Lowe
Producer(s)Guruka Singh Khalsa
Designer(s)Al Lowe
Programmer(s)Brian K. Hughes
Artist(s)Jane Cardinal
Composer(s)Craig Safan
SeriesLeisure Suit Larry
EngineSCI1
Platform(s)MS-DOS, Amiga, Macintosh, Windows
ReleaseSeptember 7, 1991
Genre(s)Adventure game
Mode(s)Single-player

Leisure Suit Larry 5: Passionate Patti Does a Little Undercover Work is the fourth entry in the Leisure Suit Larry series of graphical adventure games published by Sierra On-Line. It is the first title in the series to have 256-color graphics and a fully icon-based interface. Being an (in)direct sequel to Leisure Suit Larry 3, its title is misleading, as there is no Leisure Suit Larry 4.[1] It was re-released in 2017 on Steam with Windows support.

Gameplay[edit]

Leisure Suit Larry 5 expands on the multi-character feature of the previous installment, with control periodically passing between Larry and Patti.[1] A difference in the interface is that it includes the "Zipper" icon, enabling the character to perform an erotic action.

The overall difficulty is greatly reduced in comparison with past games; neither character can become trapped or die, and losing the game is impossible.[1] Many of the items players collect on their journey are merely optional, only triggering alternative solutions and affecting the final score, but not the game's progress.[1]

Plot[edit]

The absence of a "Leisure Suit Larry 4" forms the basis of this newest installment, as Julius Biggs has stolen the 'missing floppies' of the game and caused Larry Laffer to become amnesiac. Larry is now in the adult film industry, working for a Mafia-connected company known as PornProdCorp. His boss sends him across the United States to scout for models to appear in "America's Sexiest Home Videos".

Meanwhile, Patti is recruited by the FBI to dig up incriminating evidence on two record companies which are suspected of hiding subliminal messages in their songs. At the same time, PornProdCorp schemes to eliminate the competition in their industry by donating money to CANE (Conservatives Against Nearly Everything).

On his way back to Los Angeles, California, Larry is involved in an airplane incident, landing the plane safely and being greeted as a hero. He is invited to the White House by George H. W. Bush, where he is reunited with Patti, and Biggs's sinister role is revealed.

Development[edit]

Al Lowe has offered several reasons for the numbering discrepancy in the Leisure Suit Larry games, ranging from a scrapped sequel to an internal office prank.[1] In truth, a multiplayer Leisure Suit Larry game was apparently in the works, designed to be played over Sierra's burgeoning online service. The project was canceled due to hardware difficulties, inspiring Lowe to skip the "4" title entirely.[1]

Reception[edit]

Computer Gaming World called Leisure Suit Larry 5 "a thoroughly enjoyable game".[2] The game was also given the "Distinctive Adventure Award" by Enchanted Realms Adventure Game Magazine.[citation needed]

Al Lowe has said that each game in the Leisure Suit Larry franchise, including Leisure Suit Larry 5, sold over 250,000 copies.[3] According to Sierra On-Line, combined sales of the Larry series surpassed 1.4 million units by the end of March 1996,[4] before the release of Leisure Suit Larry: Love for Sail! The total sales of the first five Leisure Suit Larry games had surpassed 2 million copies by the time of Love for Sale's launch.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Hardcore Gaming 101: Leisure Suit Larry". Hardcore Gaming 101. Archived from the original on 2014-06-13. Retrieved 2010-02-02.
  2. ^ Lambright, J. D. (November 1991). "Uncovering Passionate Patti in Sierra's Leisure Suit Larry 5". Computer Gaming World. p. 94. Archived from the original on 2 December 2013. Retrieved 18 November 2013.
  3. ^ Lowe, Al (March 19, 1999). "The Death of Adventure Games". Al Lowe's Humor Site. Archived from the original on February 3, 2004.
  4. ^ Sierra On-Line Form 10-K (Report). Bellevue, Washington. March 31, 1996. pp. 7–9. Archived from the original on April 16, 2018.
  5. ^ "Leisure Suit sets sail". Newsweek. December 8, 1996. Archived from the original on July 8, 2017.

External links[edit]