Lemon meringue pie

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Lemon meringue pie
A slice of pie showing its crust, lemon curd filling, and meringue topping.
TypePie
CourseDessert
Serving temperatureHot or cold
Main ingredients
Food energy
(per 127 g serving)
285 kcal (1193 kJ)
Nutritional value
(per 127 g serving)
Protein4.8 g
Fat16.4 g
Carbohydrate49.7 g

Lemon meringue pie is a type of dessert pie, consisting of a shortened pastry base filled with lemon curd and topped with meringue.

History[edit]

Lemon meringue pie in Paris

Fruit desserts covered with baked meringue were found starting in the 18th century in France. Menon's pommes meringuées are a sort of thick apple sauce or apple butter covered with baked meringue in his 1739 cookbook.[1] A custard flavored with "citron" (probably a mistranslation of citron 'lemon') and covered with baked meringue, crême meringuée, was published by 1769 in English,[2] apparently a translation of an earlier edition of Menon (1755?).[3] Similar recipes cooked in a crust appear in 19th century America: apple pie covered with meringue, called 'apple a la turque' (1832)[4] and 'apples meringuées' (1846).[5] A generic 'meringue pie' based on any pie was documented in 1860.[6] The name 'Lemon Meringue Pie' appears in 1869,[7] but lemon custard pies with meringue topping were often simply called lemon cream pie.[8]

Preparation[edit]

A stiff lemon-flavored custard is prepared with egg yolks, lemon zest and juice, sugar, and sometimes starch and baked in a pie crust. Uncooked meringue, usually shaped into peaks, is spread over the top, sometimes with a sprinkle of sugar, and briefly baked.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Menon (pseud.), Nouveau traité de la Cuisine, v. 2, p. 91
  2. ^ B. Clermont, The Professed Cook, 2nd edition, 1769, p. 426
  3. ^ anonymous (Menon), Les soupers de la cour, 1778, vol. 3, p. 86>
  4. ^ A Boston Housekeeper (Mrs. N. K. M. Lee), The Cook's Own Book and Housekeeper's Register
  5. ^ Louis-Eustache Audot, French Domestic Cookery, 1846, p. 206
  6. ^ Mrs. T.J. Crowen, American Lady's System of Cookery, New York, 1860, s.v. "Meringue Pie", p. 256
  7. ^ American Agriculturalist 28:7:p. 262 (New Series, No. 270)
  8. ^ Rufus Estes, Good Things to Eat, as Suggested by Rufus, 1911, p. 89


External links[edit]