Lemon stick

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Lemon sticks are a type of stick candy.[1] They are similar to candy canes and peppermint sticks except lemon oil and acids are used for the flavoring. And for the coloring a clear batch is used for the body and a white batch for the stripe.[2] They are popular in Philadelphia.

Since 1942, Giambri's is one of the candy makers that produces them.[3]

Baltimore lemon stick[edit]

In Baltimore, Maryland, part of the culture of Baltimore is a summer rite of passage associated with the FlowerMart where lemon sticks (also referred to as lemon peppermint sticks) are a treat in the form of a peppermint candy stick stuck in a lemon. Eaten together they provide a sweet and sour taste sensation. The tradition may have come from France.[4] They are sold at the mid-spring Flower Mart held by the Women's Civic League.[4] These simple 'drinks' are made by cutting the top off a small lemon, cutting a hole into the flesh, and shoving a soft peppermint stick into it. Sucking on the stick and squeezing the lemon produces a sweet, minty, lemony drink. While mostly sold at Flower Mart, throughout summer, people in Baltimore will make these treats at home or social gatherings.[5][6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Up-to-date Candy Teacher Archived 2014-04-08 at the Wayback Machine. Page 65 Charles Apell 1921
  2. ^ Rigby's Reliable Candy Teacher: With Complete and Modern Soda, Ice Cream and Sherbet Sections, Will O. Rigby, Fred Rigby, Rigby Publishing Company, 1920
  3. ^ The Philadelphia story about lemon sticks May 3, 2012 The Baltimore Sun
  4. ^ a b Gorelick, Richard (May 3, 2013). "Consider the lemon stick: The FlowerMart treat has become a Baltimore treasure". The Baltimore Sun.
  5. ^ Gorelick, Richard (May 3, 2013). "Consider the lemon stick: The FlowerMart treat has become a Baltimore treasure". The Baltimore Sun.
  6. ^ "Blast from the Past, Lemon Peppermint Stick". Jillian's Kitchen. May 6, 2011. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 14 April 2015.