Lensman (1984 film)

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Lensman: Secret of The Lens
Lensman Secret of The Lens poster.png
Japanese theatrical poster
Directed by Yoshiaki Kawajiri
Kazuyuki Hirokawa
Produced by Michihiro Tomii
Tadami Watanabe
Masao Maruyama
Screenplay by Sōji Yoshikawa
Based on Lensman by
E. E. Smith
Music by Akira Inoue (Japanese version)
Peter Davison (American version)
Edited by Osamu Tanaka
Production
company
Madhouse
MK Productions
Distributed by Toho-Towa
Release date
  • July 7, 1984 (1984-07-07)
Running time
107 minutes
Country Japan
Language Japanese

Lensman (SF 新世紀 レンズマン, SF Shinseiki Lensman, lit. "Science Fiction New Century Lensman") is a Japanese animated film based on the Lensman novels by E. E. Smith. It was dubbed by Harmony Gold USA as Lensman: Secret of the Lens in 1988. This was re-dubbed by Streamline Pictures in 1990 and some of the voice actors were the same in both versions.

There are differences however between the two versions in terms of story and the length of the movie where the Harmony Gold version deleted some scenes that were kept in the Streamline version. Harmony Gold also arranged a whole new soundtrack for their version, with some tracks carried over from their previous movies Robotech II: The Sentinels and Robotech: The Movie whereas Streamline used the original Japanese soundtrack.

Plot[edit]

The story is about a farm boy named Kimball “Kim” Kinnison. From a dying Lensman of the Galactic Patrol, Kinnison receives a particular Lens. It contains information that would enable the Galactic Patrol to face a weapon created by the Boskone Empire. A non-human species, the Arisians, created the Lenses in order to stand up to the evil Eddorians. Through their Lenses, Lensman minds are merged with the cosmic consciousness of Arisia. Opposing the Patrol is Lord Helmuth, a Boskone leader and drug lord, who would stop at nothing to get his hands on the Lens.

The Boskone blow up the agricultural planet Mqueie where Kim lives with his father, Gary (“Ken” in the Harmony Gold dub). Now a humble farmer, Gary is one of the founders of the Galactic Patrol. If he hadn't lost an arm in battle, Gary would have been a Lensman himself. Having always dreamt of becoming a Lensman, Gary sacrifices his own life to secure Kim's escape from the pursuing Boskone fleet.

Kim escapes the Boskone with his horned and bearded near-human friend Van Buskirk. Through the movie's events, Kim also meets Clarissa MacDougall, a nurse and technician working with the Galactic Patrol. Like Gary, she cannot explain how the Lens could be transferred from the dying man to Kim.

Through the tutelage of a flying green alien hero named Worsel, Kim gradually realizes the Lens's power, which provides the key to Helmuth's defeat. He transmits the formula to the Galactic Patrol fleet, knowing that their planned attack against Helmuth would fail without the answer.

Voice cast[edit]

Characters Japanese voice actor English voice actor
(Harmony Gold, 1988)
English voice actor
(Streamline Pictures, 1990)
Kimball Kinnison Toshio Furukawa Kerrigan Mahan (Ryan O'Flannigan) Kerrigan Mahan
Peter Van Buskirk Chikao Ohtsuka Michael McConnohie (Jeremy Platt) Michael McConnohie
Clarissa MacDougall Mami Koyama ‎Melanie MacQueen (Aline Leslie) Edie Mirman
Worsel Nachi Nozawa Jeff Winkless (Philboyd Studge) Steve Kramer
DJ Bill Katsuya Kobayashi Gregory Snegoff (Greg Snow) Gregory Snegoff (Greg Snegoff)
Lord Helmuth Seizô Katô Tom Wyner (Abe Lasser) Tom Wyner
Gary Kinnison Tadashi Nakamura Michael Forest (Alfred Russell)
Tom Wyner (Abe Lasser)
Mike Reynolds
Admiral Haines Hidekatsu Shibata Mike Reynolds (Ray Michaels) Michael Forest
The Lens Tadashi Yokouchi Tom Wyner (Abe Lasser) Alexandra Kenworthy
LaVerne Thorndyke Takeshi Aono Steve Kramer (Drew Thomas) Dave Mallow
Sol Yuko Saito Theodore Lehmann (Leonard Pike) Robert Axelrod
Blakslee Yasurô Tanaka Unknown Doug Stone
Zuilk Shingo Kanemoto Kerrigan Mahan (Ryan O'Flannigan) Milton James

Reception[edit]

The movie received a mixed reception.[1][2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Solomon, Charles (1990-09-27). "MOVIE REVIEW : 'Lensman' Focuses on Jazzy Effects, Not Plot". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-06-09. 
  2. ^ "Lensman". Washington Post. 1990-08-31. Retrieved 2012-06-09. 
  3. ^ "Lensman". Deseret News. Retrieved 2012-06-09. 

External links[edit]