Leon Douglas

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Leon Douglas
Personal information
Born (1954-08-26) August 26, 1954 (age 66)
Leighton, Alabama
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 10 in (2.08 m)
Listed weight230 lb (104 kg)
Career information
High schoolColbert County
(Leighton, Alabama)
CollegeAlabama (1972–1976)
NBA draft1976 / Round: 1 / Pick: 4th overall
Selected by the Detroit Pistons
Playing career1976–1992
PositionCenter
Number13
Career history
As player:
19761980Detroit Pistons
19801982Kansas City Kings
1982–1983Carrera Venezia
1983–1984CSP Limoges
1984–1987Yoga Bologna
1987–1991Maltinti / Kleenex Pistoia
1992Majestic Firenze
As coach:
2004–2006Stillman College
2005Magic City Court Kings
2006–2014Tuskegee
2014–2017Miles
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA and Serie A statistics
Points6,977 (9.7 ppg)
Rebounds6,098 (8.5 rpg)
Assists768 (1.1 apg)
Stats Edit this at Wikidata at NBA.com
Stats Edit this at Wikidata at Basketball-Reference.com
Medals
Representing  United States
Men's basketball
Pan American Games
Gold medal – first place 1975 Mexico City Team competition

Leon Douglas (born August 26, 1954) is an American basketball coach and former professional player. He played in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and other leagues. A 6–10 ft, 230 lb center for the Alabama Crimson Tide, he was a four-time All-Southeastern Conference selection and became the first Crimson Tide player to achieve this distinction since Jerry Harper earned it in 1953–1956.

Douglas was the first Crimson Tide player to be selected in the first round of a NBA draft when he was selected fourth overall by the Detroit Pistons in 1976.[1] He was noted as one of the Pistons 5 top worst draft picks. He went on to play for four years with the Pistons and then joined the Kansas City Kings from 1980 to 1983.[1] Douglas was a member of the United States basketball team that won a gold medal at the 1975 Pan American Games. He played in the Italian league for more than a decade. Douglas' career led to his induction into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.[1]

After his retirement from playing, Douglas began his basketball coaching career.[2] He was hired by Stillman College in his native Alabama as the head basketball coach on May 5, 2004.[2] Douglas spent the 2004–05 and 2005–06 seasons as the head coach at Stillman, where he led the Tigers to the 2006 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC) Tournament championship and advanced to the NCAA Division II Tournament.[1] He left Stillman on July 17, 2006, to become the head basketball coach at Tuskegee University.[1] The Tuskegee Golden Tigers advanced to the Elite Eight in the 2014 NCAA Division II Men's Basketball Tournament as the furthest an SIAC school has ever advanced in the tournament.[3] After many years of infidelity he was forced to resign from Tuskegee in 2014. with no where else to go he landed at another SIAC school.l[3]

He was hired as the head basketball coach atl Miles College on July 31, 2014, as his 3rd SIAC school.[4] He was fired by Miles as coach after his third season in 2017.[5] In 12 seasons as a head coach, he has a 173–176 record coaching at Stillman, Tuskegee and Miles.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Douglas leaves Stillman to coach Tuskegee". Tuscaloosa News. July 17, 2006. Retrieved September 26, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ a b "Landing Douglas is a coup for Stillman". Tuscaloosa News. May 5, 2004. Retrieved September 26, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b Rankin, Duane (August 11, 2014). "Commentary: Leon Douglas explains why he left Tuskegee". Montgomery Advertiser. Retrieved September 26, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Miles hires ex-NBA, Alabama player Leon Douglas". USA Today. July 31, 2014. Retrieved September 26, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ Moore, Eric (July 11, 2018). "Fred Watson Leaves Benedict for Miles". Omnidan. Retrieved September 26, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links[edit]