Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine

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University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Miami med seal.png
TypePrivate
Established1952
DeanHenri Ford, MD
Academic staff
1,397
Students814 medical, 567 graduate
Location, ,
25°47′30.5″N 80°12′43.2″W / 25.791806°N 80.212000°W / 25.791806; -80.212000Coordinates: 25°47′30.5″N 80°12′43.2″W / 25.791806°N 80.212000°W / 25.791806; -80.212000
CampusUrban
Websitehttp://www.med.miami.edu/
University of Miami Miller School logo.svg

The University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine (UMMSM) is the graduate medical school of the University of Miami. Founded in 1952, it is the oldest medical school in the state of Florida.

Campus[edit]

The main medical campus is located in the Health District area of Miami within the 153-acre (0.62 km2) University of Miami Jackson Memorial Medical Center complex. The medical center includes three University of Miami-owned hospitals that make up the UHealth System: University of Miami Hospital, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Anne Bates Leach Eye Hospital, home to the top-ranked Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. Affiliated hospitals on the medical campus include Jackson Memorial Hospital, Holtz Children's Hospital, and the Miami Veterans Administration Healthcare System. Jackson Memorial Hospital serves as the school's major teaching facility and is the largest hospital in the United States with 1,547 beds.[1]

Regional campus[edit]

From 2004 through 2011, the Miller School offered instruction on the campus of Florida Atlantic University (FAU) in Boca Raton, Florida, approximately 60 miles (97 km) north of the parent campus in Miami. FAU is a public university, and the State of Florida supported the Boca Raton program with an annual contribution of $15 million.[2][3] Medical students were admitted to either the Miami or Boca Raton programs and spent all four years studying on the selected campus.[2] In April 2005, the Boca Raton program was expanded into a full four-year medical degree program.[3] All graduates of the Boca Raton program received University of Miami degrees rather than FAU degrees. In 2011, FAU created its own medical school, independent of the University of Miami.[4]

Starting with the Class of 2014, the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine no longer offers incoming students the option of attending the Boca Raton campus. Training sites and Miller School faculty associated with the regional campus were integrated into the MD/MPH program. The University of Miami continues to sponsor multiple residency programs in Broward and Palm Beach counties under the umbrella of the Palm Beach Regional Campus (UMPBRC).

Academic programs[edit]

Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, the primary teaching hospital for the Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami and the largest hospital in the United States with 1,547 beds,[5] July 2010
In partnership with the University of Miami medical school's trauma center at Jackson Memorial Hospital, U.S. Army surgeons operate on a wounded combatant during the Iraq War, March 2003
  • The University of Miami's Bascom Palmer Eye Institute is the top facility in the country for ophthalmology clinical care and research. The Anne Bates Leach Eye Hospital annually serves 160,000 outpatients of ophthalmology and other specialties, largely for microsurgery procedures.
  • For its pioneering work in islet cell transplantation, the Miller School's Diabetes Research Institute joined the National Institutes of Health and the Naval Medical Research Center as the only academic partner in the national initiative to cure diabetes through organ transplantation.
  • The Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center treats 3,000 newly diagnosed cancer patients each year and treats thousands more in ongoing treatment from throughout the U.S. and Latin America. Approximately 200 cancer-related clinical trials are under way at the University of Miami's Sylvester Center, supported by more than $31 million in research grants.
  • Dedicated to finding a cure for paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury, researchers at the University of Miami's Miami Project to Cure Paralysis found the first direct evidence of successful regeneration of adult human central nervous system tissue. The Miami Project conducts basic and clinical research trials and a program that permits spinal cord-injured men to father children.
  • The University of Miami Ear Institute houses the nation's second most active cochlear implant program, restoring hearing to adults and children with profound deafness. The University of Miami's Barton G. Kids Hear Now Foundation Cochlear Implant Family Resource Center, dedicated to assisting hearing-challenged children and their families' transitions from a silent world into the hearing world through the use of cochlear implant technology, opened at the Ear Institute in September 2010.
  • The School of Medicine's Mailman Center for Child Development has a number of model programs that help children with developmental disabilities.
  • The University of Miami Jackson Transplant Program is one of the nation's busiest, responsible for half of the pediatric multivisceral transplants in the world. University of Miami Jackson has active transplant programs for bone marrow, heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, pancreas and intestines.
  • Significant federal funds support research at the University of Miami's Comprehensive AIDS Program, including HIV studies in pregnant women, pediatric HIV/AIDS clinical trials, various drug protocol studies, heterosexual transmission of AIDS, blood transfusion safety studies, and the national cooperative drug discovery group.
  • University of Miami's Center on Aging, dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for older people, conducts significant research on geriatric challenges and issues.
  • University of Miami's Center for Therapeutic Innovation (CTI), founded in 2011, brings together expertise in small molecule discovery, pharmacology and disease biology to enable academic drug discovery efforts. Several prominent projects include discovery of epigenetic modulators for cancer, inflammatory diseases, neuroscience and programs centered on a variety of disease targets, including mucopolysaccharidosis, addiction, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, obesity, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and others.
  • The University of Miami's John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics applies genomics to the practice of medicine. In 2007 at the institute, Margaret Vance, MD and her University of Miami colleagues reported a new gene responsible for multiple sclerosis.
  • The University of Miami's Department of Physical Therapy offers an entry level clinical doctoral degree (DPT) and an academic doctoral degree (Ph.D.) in physical therapy.[6]
  • The University of Miami's Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute researches the biology of stem cells and translates basic research into new regenerative therapies. In 2007, Joshua Hare, MD and his University of Miami colleagues reported that a new stem cell therapy was safe for the treatment of myocardial infarctions and reduced complications from the condition.[7]
  • The Miami Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at the University of Miami was created in 2012 through an award by the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. CTSI's mission is to be promote clinical and translational CT research and advance excellence in culturalized clinical and translational research.

Teaching and training affiliates[edit]

The University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine campus in Miami's Health District, July 2016

The majority of Miller School residency and fellowship training sponsored by the Miller School of Medicine is offered in conjunction with the Jackson Memorial Hospital System in Miami-Dade County.[8] Additional residency programs are available through the Palm Beach Regional Campus[9]

Joint programs[edit]

The School of Medicine offers joint-degree programs in coordination with other disciplines in the University:

Rankings[edit]

The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine is currently ranked 39th overall for NIH funding, the highest of any medical school in the state of Florida.[16]

In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked the University of Miami Physical Therapy Department the ninth best such program in the nation.[17]

As of 2018, the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine school is ranked 50th in research by U.S. News & World Report.[18]

In 2018, U.S. News & World Report listed the University of Miami's Bascom Palmer Eye Institute as the best hospital in the nation for ophthalmology for the 15th year in a row.[19] In addition, the University of Miami's Holtz Children's Hospital was nationally ranked in three pediatric specialties.[20] In December 2018, Expertscape recognized the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute as seventh best in the world for Type 1 diabetes care.[21]

Research[edit]

The Miller Medical School has more than 1,500 ongoing projects funded by more than $200 million in external grants and contracts to University of Miami faculty.[22] The medical campus includes more than 500,000 sq ft (46,000 m2) of research space. The recently completed Building I of the University of Miami Life Science and Technology Park added an additional 252,000 sq ft (23,400 m2) of dedicated research space and is the first phase of a five building, 1.8 million square feet (170,000 m2) lab ready research park. It is located in the Miami Hospital District and adjacent to the medical campus.[23]

The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis is a research center dedicated to research in the field of paralysis and spinal cord injury with the eventual goal of finding a cure for paralyzing injuries. Based at the Miller School of Medicine, the Miami Project is considered a world leader in neurological injury research. The center was founded in 1985 by a research physician and three others who had dealt with spinal cord injuries. Since its 1985 opening, the center has identified a family of genes that may control the ability of the optic nerve to regenerate.[24]

The Miller Medical School also developed the famous "Harvey" teaching mannequin that is able to recreate many of the physical findings of the cardiology examination, including palpation, auscultation, and electrocardiography.[25][26][27]

The University of Miami's Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute (ISCI) is leading cutting edge treatment for heart attacks that include injecting a person's own bone marrow stem cells to repair heart damage following a heart attack.

Admissions[edit]

In 2019, 463 out of 9,164 applicants to the Leonard M. Miller's School of Medicine were interviewed for a class of 154 students. The entering class presented an average overall GPA of 3.72, a science GPA of 3.67, and composite MCAT in the 87th percentile.[28]

In 2018, 173 out of a total 9,164 applicants to the Miller School's combined MD/MPH class were interviewed for a class of 54 students. The entering class presented an overall GPA average of 3.66, a science GPA of 3.54, and a composite MCAT in the 84th percentile.[29]

Donations[edit]

In December 2004, the University of Miami School of Medicine received a $100 million donation from the family of Leonard M. Miller, former president and CEO of Lennar. It was the single largest donation in University of Miami history at the time and the second largest gift ever given to a university in Florida. The school was subsequently renamed in Miller's honor.[30]

In February 2014, Oscar de la Renta recreated his entire Spring presentation, Designed for A Cure 2014 collection, to raise money for the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.[31]

In October 2014, The Lennar Foundation announced a $50 million naming donation for a new UHealth ambulatory services center located in Coral Gables.[32] To be located adjacent to the main University of Miami campus, the new Lennar Foundation Medical Center at UHealth Coral Gables will expand outpatient access to UHealth physicians in South Miami. Future plans include relocating the UMiami Student Health Center to the new facility.[33]

In May 2015, Stuart Miller, chairman of Lennar and chairman of the University of Miami Board of Trustees, unveiled a $50 million donation for construction of a new medical education building to be located on the main medical center campus.[34]

Notable alumni[edit]

Notable faculty[edit]

In popular culture[edit]

On FX's reality television series Nip/Tuck, plastic surgeons Sean McNamara and Christian Troy are graduates of the University of Miami School of Medicine.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jackson Memorial Hospital". Jackson Memorial Hospital. Retrieved 2010-02-07.
  2. ^ a b "UMSM@FAM | University of Miami". University of Miami. Archived from the original on April 20, 2009. Retrieved 2010-02-09.
  3. ^ a b "UM/FAU Medical School Partnership Receives Final Approval". Florida Atlantic University. Archived from the original on 2010-05-20. Retrieved 2010-02-09.
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-02-04. Retrieved 2015-02-10.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "100 of the largest hospitals and health systems in America," Becker's Hospital Review, July 2010
  6. ^ "University of Miami". University of Miami. Retrieved 2011-03-21.
  7. ^ "First Human Trial Tests Stem-Cell-Based Treatment For Heart Attacks". Science Daily. Mar 28, 2007. Retrieved 2010-02-07.
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-02-13. Retrieved 2015-02-13.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ "Graduate Medical Education at Miller School of Medicine". Gme.med.miami.edu. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  10. ^ "Medical Scientist Training Program (MD/PhD) - University of Miami - Graduate Studies". Biomed.med.miami.edu. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  11. ^ "MD/JD Program - Miller School of Medicine Admissions". Admissions.med.miami.edu. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  12. ^ "M.D./M.B.A. Program - Miller School of Medicine Admissions". Admissions.med.miami.edu. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  13. ^ "MD/MS in Genomic Medicine - Miller School of Medicine Admissions". Admissions.med.miami.edu. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  14. ^ a b "MD/MPH Program - Miller School of Medicine Admissions". Admissions.med.miami.edu. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  15. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-03-24. Retrieved 2015-04-28.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  16. ^ "Miller School of Medicine Continues Its Rise in NIH Research Grant Rankings - Miller School of Medicine - University of Miami". Med.miami.edu. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  17. ^ "USNews.com". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved 2013-05-14.
  18. ^ "Research Rankings - Best Medical Schools". US News & World Report. Archived from the original on 2012-04-15. Retrieved 2015-10-12.
  19. ^ "Bascom Palmer Eye Institute - University of Miami Hospital and Clinics : Overview". Health.usnews.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  20. ^ "Holtz Childrens Hospital at UM Jackson Memorial Medical Center : Overview". Health.usnews.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  21. ^ "Expertscape: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, December 2018". Expertscape.com. December 2018. Retrieved 2018-12-12.
  22. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-04-17. Retrieved 2009-11-16.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  23. ^ "Facts, Figures, Accolades, and Accomplishments". University of Miami. Archived from the original on 2009-04-17. Retrieved 2009-11-16.
  24. ^ "Research Landing". University of Miami. Archived from the original on 2009-10-19. Retrieved 2009-11-16.
  25. ^ "simulation". Answers.com. Retrieved 2009-09-10.
  26. ^ Simulation#Type of models
  27. ^ "Harvey: Major Changes". Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education. Archived from the original on 2007-03-28.
  28. ^ "MD Class of 2023". Retrieved 2 August 2019.
  29. ^ "MD-MPH Class of 2023". Retrieved 2 August 2019.
  30. ^ Bandell, Brian (December 13, 2004). "Miller's legacy: $100 million to UM medical school". American City Business Journals.
  31. ^ Kleinman, Rebecca (19 February 2014). "Oscar de la Renta Takes Collection to Miami". Wwd.com. Retrieved 19 February 2014.
  32. ^ "Gift of $50 Million to Name UHealth's New Coral Gables Medical Center - Miller School of Medicine - University of Miami". Med.miami.edu. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  33. ^ "Planned Gables UHealth facility named at groundbreaking". Themiamihurrican.com. 24 October 2014. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  34. ^ Diaz, Al. "UM exceeds fundraising goal with Miller family $55 million gift". Miamiherald.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  35. ^ Marcus, Erin N. (July 24, 2007). "Following Doctor's Orders Isn't Hard, if You Can Read". The New York Times. Retrieved 18 January 2017.

External links[edit]