Leonardo da Vinci Art School

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The New Deal, mural by Conrad A. Albrizio (1934)

The Leonardo da Vinci Art School (the "Leonardo") was an art school founded in New York City (1923-1942), whose most famous student was Isamu Noguchi and whose director was sculptor and poet Onorio Ruotolo.

History[edit]

First decade[edit]

With sculptor Attilio Piccirilli, Ruotolo founded the school to provide low-cost, often free art instruction to the working poor, mostly in the evening. The school was first located at St. Nicholas of Myra, Christian Orthodox Church, 288 East 10th Street, off Avenue A and near Tompkins Square Park. Tuition was six dollars ($6) per month—or free. (Joseph Sciorra and Peter Vellon, " Onorio Ruotolo: A Life in Art and Politics," America and Italia Review, April 2004)

Second decade[edit]

In 1934, the school reorganized and reopened at 149 East 34th Street, graced by "The New Deal" mural of Conrad Albrizio.[1][2][3] With political and union backing, the school expanded to include the "Friends of Italian Arts Association," eliminating tuition altogether, so that student needed provide only their own art materials. No employees received payment for their services. For the school's rededication, Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia unveiled a fresco symbolic of the New Deal. (Joseph Sciorra and Peter Vellon, " Onorio Ruotolo: A Life in Art and Politics," America and Italia Review, April 2004)

Closure[edit]

Contributions diminished significantly during World War II, leading to the Leonardo's closture at its third and final location at 130 East 16th Street on April 28, 1942. (Joseph Sciorra and Peter Vellon, " Onorio Ruotolo: A Life in Art and Politics," America and Italia Review, April 2004)

People associated[edit]

Instructors[edit]

Alumni[edit]

Associated art[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Paintings: Murals: Conrad A. Albrizio: titled "The New Deal"". National Archives. Retrieved 14 October 2015. 
  2. ^ Miller, Robin (21 September 2015). "Baton Rouge now home to second historic Conrad Albrizio mosaic — this one saved from demolition in Algiers". The Advocate. Retrieved 14 October 2015. 
  3. ^ "Conrad Albrizio". KnowLA. Retrieved 14 October 2015. 

External links[edit]