Les Fairclough

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Leslie Fairclough
L. Fairclough - St. Helens & England.jpg
Ogden's Cigarette card featuring Les Fairclough
Personal information
Full name Leslie Stuart Fairclough
Born 30 September 1902[1]
Prescot, St. Helens, England
Died 7 October 1951(1951-10-07) (aged 49)[2]
St. Helens, England
Playing information
Height 5 ft 5 in (165 cm)
Weight 11 st 0 lb (70 kg; 154 lb)
Position Centre, Stand-off, Scrum-half
Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1918–32 St. Helens 355 84 3 0 258
Representative
Years Team Pld T G FG P
≥1918–≤32 Lancashire 20
1925–31 England 10 3 0 0 9
1926–30 Great Britain 6 6 0 0 18
Source: [3][4][5]

Leslie "Les" Stuart Fairclough (30 September 1902 – 7 October 1951) was an English professional rugby league footballer of the 1920s and 1930s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England, and Lancashire, and at club level for St. Helens, as a centre, stand-off/five-eighth, or scrum-half/halfback, i.e. number 3 or 4, 6, or 7.[3]

Playing career[edit]

International honours[edit]

Les Fairclough won caps for England while at St. Helens in 1925 against Wales (2 matches), in 1926 against Wales, and Other Nationalities, in 1927 against Wales, in 1928 against Wales (2 matches), in 1930 against Other Nationalities, in 1930 against Other Nationalities, in 1931 against Wales,[4] and won caps for Great Britain while at St. Helens in 1926–27 against New Zealand, in 1928 against Australia (2 matches), and New Zealand (2 matches), and in 1929–30 against Australia.[5]

County Cup Final appearances[edit]

Les Fairclough played stand-off/five-eighth and scored a try in St. Helens' 10–2 victory over St Helens Recs in the 1926 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1926–27 season at Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington on Saturday 20 November 1926.

Honoured at St Helens R.F.C.[edit]

Les Fairclough is a St Helens R.F.C. Hall of Fame inductee.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  2. ^ "Sports News in Brief". The Manchester Guardian. 8 October 1951. p. 8. 
  3. ^ a b "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.com". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018. 
  4. ^ a b "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018. 
  5. ^ a b "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018. 
  6. ^ "St Helens Hall of Fame". saints.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 

External links[edit]