Leslie Barns

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Leslie Barns
Location Leslie Street, Toronto
Canada
Coordinates 43°39′31″N 79°19′37″W / 43.65861°N 79.32694°W / 43.65861; -79.32694Coordinates: 43°39′31″N 79°19′37″W / 43.65861°N 79.32694°W / 43.65861; -79.32694
Operated by Toronto Transit Commission
Construction
Structure type TTC streetcar maintenance and storage facility
Other information
Status under construction
History
Opened expected 2015

Leslie Barns is a streetcar maintenance and storage facility under construction at the southeast corner of Leslie Street and Lake Shore Boulevard[1] in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. When completed it will house and service the majority of Toronto Transit Commission's fleet of Flexity Outlook light rail vehicles.[2][3]

Electrical substation under construction at the northwest corner of the site

Six sites were considered and Toronto City Council made the final choice of surplus land at Ashbridges Bay Wastewater Treatment Plant, at the southeast corner of Leslie Street and Lake Shore Boulevard, on November 11, 2009.

While the existing Roncesvalles Carhouse and Russell Carhouse will house some of the vehicles, the maintenance facilities at these older facilities cannot accommodate the new vehicles, which are considerably longer than the TTC's current streetcar fleet.[4][5][6][7]

The site is 22 acres (0.089 km2) and construction was projected to cost $345 million CAD in June 2009.[6] The carhouse will cover 17,510 square metres (4.33 acres).[8] The first of the new streetcar vehicles are scheduled to enter service in 2013–2014. The carhouse is scheduled to be ready to service them by Spring 2015.[9]

The facility will include a 250 metre brake test track.[8]

Construction of the spur along Leslie Street, from the facility, to Queen Street East, began in September 2013.[10][11] The construction was projected to require 12 weeks of road closures.

The other five sites under consideration were:[3]

The facility is budgeted at $497 million CAD.[12]

Natalie Alcoba, writing in the National Post, reported on January 28, 2015, that the facility was expected to be almost empty, when it opened later in 2015, because Bombardier had fallen far behind delivery of the new vehicles.[13] As of January 2015 only three new Flexity vehicles were in operation, when the delivery schedule said forty-three vehicles should have been delivered.

In May 2015, 60 metres (200 ft) of track was laid 9 centimetres (3.5 in) too high by the contractor and will need to be rebuilt resulting in delays to the track project time line to mid July 2015.[14]

In constructing the track along Leslie Street, a variation of the TTC's normal technique was used. Track is laid within a concrete channel or “tub” which has vertical concrete wings along a concrete base. This tub will contain a rubber-like substance that will provide vibration isolation between the track and the roadbed.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Project History Leslie Barns". Toronto Transit Commission. Retrieved September 7, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Leslie Barns Streetcar Maintenance & Storage Facility". Toronto Transit Commission. Retrieved September 7, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "New Light Rail Vehicle (LRV) Maintenance & Storage Facility - The Site". City of Toronto. November 29, 2009. Retrieved March 15, 2012. [dead link]
  4. ^ Natalie Alcoba (February 2, 2011). "TTC moving ahead with new facility in Leslieville". National Post. Archived from the original on March 21, 2013. Staff are willing to look at housing some of the vehicles at the Hillcrest yard, or the Exhibition Loop, but say the Ashbridges site is necessary for, at the very least, maintenance. The plan is already nine months delayed, and deferring Wednesday’s decision by 90 days means the soil removal work cannot begin until August because of migratory birds. 
  5. ^ "New Light Rail Vehicle (LRV) Maintenance & Storage Facility". City of Toronto. February 22, 2012. Retrieved March 15, 2012. [dead link]
  6. ^ a b David Nickle (June 11, 2009). "TRANSIT: TTC looking to Portlands for its storage facility". Durham Region. Retrieved March 16, 2012.  mirror
  7. ^ David Nickle (June 18, 2009). "EAST TORONTO: Residents not happy with possible LRV facility". Inside Toronto. Retrieved March 16, 2012.  mirror
  8. ^ a b Nigel Terpstra (November 23, 2012). "Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About TTC's New 'Leslie Barn'". Urban Toronto. Archived from the original on March 21, 2013. Another vital but less-talked about piece of Toronto's evolving transit network is the Ashbridges Bay Streetcar Maintenance & Storage Facility, recently redubbed 'The Leslie Barn.' This 279,463 square foot facility will be sited on a piece of vacant land at the southeast corner of Leslie Street and Lake Shore Blvd. 
  9. ^ "Construction Overview and FAQs Leslie Barns". Toronto Transit Commission. Retrieved September 7, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Leslie Street closure at Lake Shore Boulevard expected to last 12 weeks". Inside Toronto. September 19, 2013. Archived from the original on 2013-09-23. Retrieved September 23, 2013. The TTC was expecting a 12-week closure of Leslie Street immediately north of Lake Shore Boulevard to begin as soon as this week. 
  11. ^ "Leslie Barns: September 13, 2013 - Construction Update, Closure on Leslie Street". Toronto Transit Commission. September 13, 2013. Archived from the original on September 23, 2013. 
  12. ^ Chris Kitchings (June 20, 2013). "New streetcars will roll out on Spadina, Bathurst first". CTV News. Retrieved June 20, 2013. According to the implementation plan, the capital costs for the streetcars and upgrades have surpassed $2 billion. That figure includes the $1.1-billion price tag for the streetcars themselves, $497 million for a new Leslie Street facility where the streetcars will be stored and maintained, and infrastructure modifications. 
  13. ^ Natalie Alcoba (2015-01-28). "Massive $500M facility for new TTC streetcars might sit nearly empty when it opens". Toronto: National Post. Archived from the original on 2015-01-30. The problem is, the order is delayed. Instead of the 43 originally anticipated by this time, or even the scaled-back expectation of 15, only three are in service. 
  14. ^ http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/leslie-street-barns-delayed-by-faulty-streetcar-track-installation-1.3090842
  15. ^ Steve Munro (2015-05-28). "Another Delay For Leslie Street". Steve Munro. Retrieved 2015-05-28. The purpose of the [concretre] “tub” track structure turns out to not be a function of load distribution on the soil below, but to act as a container for a “hockey puck” like substance that will provide vibration isolation between the track and the roadbed. This is similar to the design used on new subway lines where there is a layer of large discs between the concrete ties under the track and the floor of the tunnel. 

External links[edit]